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Three top tips for students

Hazel MIngrey2 February 2017

You found your online reading list on Moodle by spotting the link in the ‘Library Resources’ block, or when searching for your course on the ReadingLists@UCL home page.  Perhaps you read some key texts for tutorials in the first flush of enthusiasm in the autumn, however now it is revision time and you need to look over some of those readings in a hurry!

If you are short on time and need to find things quickly, here are our top three for using ReadingLists@UCL:

  1. Long reading list?  Re-order the readings by importance (essential, recommended etc.) or type (journal, book…), using the ‘Grouped by section’ button.  Then scroll down, or use the ‘Table of contents’ to jump down, to the section on ‘Essential’ readings for example.
  2. Convert the list to pdf to print out (Export -> Export to PDF) to highlight and scribble on; or keep your notes virtual by using the ‘Add note’ button on each reading.  These notes are private to you.
  3. Log in!  Once logged in, click on your name at the top of the screen and ‘View Profile’ to see your private notes and reading intentions.
Group by type2

(Click to enlarge)

 

From speaking with students we know you find reading lists intuitive to use, however we also have a little more guidance on our webpages, just in case.  We are always very keen to hear of anything that can be improved, so please contact us with suggestions or questions!

 

 

 

 

Goodbye paper, hello electronic: one academic’s story

SandraBamborough17 September 2015

One member of UCL teaching staff used to hand out paper versions of his reading list for use in class, however he has now changed his practice to use ReadingLists@UCL instead.

During face-to-face teaching, students now add their notes about each reading directly into the online reading list, using their ipads or laptops. Notes against each reading are private to each student and accessible only by them. They can also use the ‘Have you read this?’ buttons on ReadingLists@UCL to organise their reading intentions.

If a printed version of a reading list is still useful you, or they, can export the online reading list to a printable PDF:

  • to print the reading list in its existing layout, select ‘Export’ then ‘Export to PDF’
  • to print a list of the readings in alphabetical order, use the ‘View bibliography’ button click ‘Export’ then ‘Export to PDF’
  • or to view this list in different citation styles: ‘View bibliography’ and select a citation style from the drop-down box ‘Harvard’. If a key citation style is missing, use the ‘Feedback’ button (top toolbar) to request another.

The QR code in the top right hand corner of each printed reading list enables students to return directly to the online version, with all the advantages that brings.

Do let us know about any other exciting ideas you may have, or tell us about innovative ways in which you use your online reading lists. Students, please use the Feedback button on your reading lists to let us know your thoughts!