X Close

ReadingLists@UCL

Home

Menu

Happy new year!

Hazel MIngrey26 January 2017

Happy new year! 2016 was a good year for ReadingLists@UCL.

Here is our year in numbers

  • 2705 lists were set up by December 2016. Which represented:
  • 57% of all taught modules having an online reading list.
  • 407,545 visits (January – December 2016) which equated to:
  • 1,528,024 page views

If you are interested in the number of visitors to your reading list, log in to the list and click on the green ‘Dashboard’ button.  It will show the number of page views and how many times each reading has been clicked on in the past 30 days.

You prefer a story to figures?

In this film clip, an academic and student at the Shakespeare Institute, Birmingham, discuss their online reading lists and why they are helpful to their teaching and learning, respectively. They use the same reading list software as UCL, but with a different name. (Length: 3 minutes 53 seconds).

Happy new year 2017

Paul Wilkinson ‘Party Popper

Make a new year resolution

… to guide your students better in 2017 by setting up an online reading list, or updating an existing one.

The TLS team in the library are very happy to help, or drop in to our Senate House office on a Wednesday afternoon for a hands-on session. You could walk away with a list set up and completed!  Something ticked off your to do list: a good start to the year.

 

Have students really looked at this list?

PamelaClarke31 July 2014

Interested to know how frequently your reading lists are being looked at?  Has that important item on your list actually been read by students?  If you are curious,  then try the green “Dashboard”  button at the top of your reading list.

Dashboard is a neat feature that provides some statistics on how many times a resource  has been clicked on, and even provides links to alternative resources for some items.  The Dashboard button is located under the table of contents on your list, and uses a traffic-light colour coding system to indicate frequency of use.  Green for high,  amber for moderate, and red for low resource use.  You can adjust the date range to capture a termly or even weekly snapshot of traffic.

One note of warning: the figures include repeat clicks on the resource, rather than the number of individual students accessing readings, so figures are a rough indicator only.

This can also have more useful applications if you are interested in using this type of feedback as part of your teaching practice.  Check out the Dashboard and let us know if you find it useful, or can think of any improvements!