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Alma update and Digital Services support

Margaret Stone15 October 2020

This month there are two important updates from the Digital Services team.

Alma’s new layout

From 1 November 2020, you will see a new screen layout when you log in to Alma.  The aims, according to the suppliers, are to increase the working area in Alma, improve navigation, give more options to customize menus, and facilitate improved user workflows.

Please note that this is not the same as the planned changes to the Alma metadata editor, which will be coming next year.

If you would like to try out the new interface and get used to it before 1 November, you can switch it on in the user menu of Alma.  Go to your personal user menu (head and shoulders icon) in the top right of the Alma screen and click to open the drop-down menu.  Then click on “Enable new layout”.

More information is available on the Alma pages of the Ex Libris Knowledge Center or from this short Alma New Layout video.

Digital Services support update

Some 18 months after introducing the new ISD support team for many of our applications, we are retiring the digital-library-support email address.  In its place, we are re-emphasising the first-line support role of ‘Functional Leads’ for Alma and other services.  Beyond that, there is now a single support form which guides you to the correct support route for each service.  For more information, and to bookmark the link to the support form, visit our Digital Services Support pages on LibNet.

The reason for these changes is to make the support process more efficient and to ensure that library staff get the quickest response from the relevant support team.  For example, the new support form prompts the enquirer to indicate to which service the query relates.

For many digital services, such as Alma, there are designated Functional Leads in Library Services who are the experts and coordinators for the digital service. For these services, please first contact the relevant Functional Lead with your query or problem report. They can assist with resolving some issues directly, collating multiple reports and leading the liaison with ISD as necessary. For Alma, the Functional Leads are responsible for granting and updating access rights to Alma.  For this new process, please see the updated FAQ on the Alma page on LibNet.

The next tier of support is provided by the Library Applications Team in ISD. This is a dedicated team for our digital services, who can also bring in assistance from other support teams in ISD as necessary. When a support ticket is opened from the problem report form, either by the Functional Lead or by you directly, the Library Applications Team will respond to the ticket.  Please only contact the team through the support form or through the tickets which are generated.  You may occasionally come across their team email address, but it is only used for internal communications, not for raising new queries or issues.

Progress on problem reports and requests for service changes is monitored by Rob Drinkall and Margaret Stone on behalf of Library Services. This liaison includes escalating urgent matters and clarifying the priority of ongoing work.  Please do contact us if you have any queries about these support arrangements.

Reminder: Visit the new problem report form.

Innovating and sharing new ways to work efficiently

Andrew Watson1 September 2020

UCL Ways of Working wheelWhen the Retrospective Cataloguing Team adopted the theme Innovating and sharing new ways to work efficiently from UCL Ways of Working as one of our goals earlier this year, little did we know how apt it was going to prove.  Within weeks, we were abruptly separated from the printed material we spent much of our time cataloguing and our chief activity appeared to be curtailed overnight.

Or was it?  One of our key skills is correcting and enhancing metadata, honed through working with Special Collections material stored offsite where retrieval depends on the accurate matching of bibliographic data to barcode numbers.  Analysis of data, accurate matching and enhancement lend themselves to many situations and this is where our journey of innovation led…

We began by matching over 1,900 of our rare books to entries in the English Short Title Catalogue (ESTC), a union catalogue of imprints chiefly in the English language published prior to 1801, and added UCL holdings.  ESTC is one of the chief international finding aids for such material.  We then turned our attention to Special Collections archive holdings adding barcodes and shelf locations to records for items contained within 350 boxes of Karl Pearson and J B S Haldane papers.

Next, Tabitha Tuckett enlisted our help in an innovative project she devised to meet academic needs whilst physical collections were inaccessible.  This involved us working with the Special Collections Digitisation Team  to make all stored digital images of Special Collections printed material available online in the UCL Digital Collections repository.  We assisted by enhancing the relevant metadata to enable discovery.  In addition, we added links in the catalogue records so that for the first time, descriptions of our rare books on Explore lead directly to online images of the resources, as in this example from the Laurence Housman collection:  An anti-suffrage alphabet.

Testing software for the delivery of Special Collections teaching, moderating online events, enhancing presentation transcriptions, so the journey continues…

As for my own innovative activity, I’ve been converting Excel spreadsheets of bibliographic data into MARC records for importation into Alma.  Compiled by the Folklore Society Library for their rare material, the data required analysis in order to be assigned to an array of over 40 MARC fields and subfields.  It is the first time this has been attempted for material held by Special Collections which has complex inventory importation requirements.  Tom Meehan provided invaluable assistance by setting up the necessary import profiles in Alma, an innovative activity for him and one deserving a blog post of its own which Tom plans to provide.  The records are now available on Explore by searching for flsrare.

What innovative activities has the lockdown period led you to explore?  Do share!

Slade School of Fine Art Degree Showcase 2020

L ( Elizabeth ) Lawes9 July 2020

Due to the current campus lockdown, this year’s Slade School of Fine Art student degree shows were cancelled – a disastrous outcome for those students who had spent three or four years (BA/BFA) or two years (MA/MFA) studying towards that moment, their one opportunity to showcase their work to the wider world.

But Slade staff and students are nothing if not open to experimentation and have embraced the restrictions by producing a virtual degree show. Each student has their own microsite which includes a personal statement and images or video content.

One of the highlights is the work of BA student Mataio Austin Dean, who has produced a tripartite work titled Colonial Structures focusing on UCL’s colonial connections. Anyone who attended the Special Collections Late event, Protest!  Voices of dissent in art and text, will remember Mataio’s moving performance of the late 18th century industrial ballad, The Four Loom Weaver.

The showcase also has some associated live events; from 13th July Slade Radio will broadcast audio work, discussion, talks and other aural miscellany via Twitch.

The online platform is available until 14th July and is an opportunity to celebrate the work of students graduating, before a celebratory physical exhibition next year.

Colonial Structures: UCL-Wilkins, Mataio Austin Dean, 2020, inkjet on paper, approx. 30 x 40cm.

Colonial Structures: UCL-Wilkins, Mataio Austin Dean, 2020, inkjet on paper, approx. 30 x 40cm.

Results announced for Anthony Davis Book Collecting Prize 2020

Tabitha Tuckett9 July 2020

Books on shelves

The winner – Alexandra Plane – and six other finalists have been announced for this year’s Anthony Davis Book Collecting Prize, which aims to encourage students at an early stage of collecting physical books, manuscripts and printed material.

The competition is open to any student studying for a degree at a London-based university, and this year received a record-breaking 64 applications – the largest number in the prize’s history. Universities represented included Birkbeck, Queen Mary University of London, Goldsmiths, SOAS, King’s College London, and UCL which hosted the prize for the first time this year.

Collectors under lockdown

Despite the pandemic, students applied from wherever they found themselves during lockdown, from Norway to Texas, Bulgaria to China, Vienna to North Wales, with many applicants unexpectedly reunited with, or separated from, their collections.

The range of collection themes was similarly wide, from Singaporean debut poets to Slovakian Beat poetry, Norfolk history to a 20th-century novelist who used eight different pseudonyms, photobooks and queer manga to bilingual parallel texts and women’s genealogical health.

Finding the collectors of the future

The guidelines of the competition specify that ‘the intention is to encourage collecting and we expect that applicants’ collections will be embryonic, so their size, age and value are irrelevant. What is much more important is the enthusiasm and commitment of the collector, the interest of the theme and the vision of how the collection will be developed’. But selecting a winner from so many applicants was a challenge.

After a process of longlisting, shortlisting and interviews, the judges have chosen Alexandra Plane for ‘Books that built a zoo’: her collection of works by Gerald Durrell. Alexandra is studying for an MA in Library And Information Studies at UCL.

The other finalists were:

  • Imogen Grubin for her collection of early 20th-century editions of Victorian literature
  • Blake Harrison who collects material on James Joyce’s Ulysses
  • Jiayue Liu for a collection of early 20th-century English Private Press editions
  • Naomi Oppenheim who collects editions produced by Black British publishers in the mid 20th century
  • Bori Papp for her collection of Hungarian translations of English literature illustrated by the artist Piroska Szántó
  • Kit Rooney for a collection of hand-written inscriptions in books.

See the finalists present their collections online

Join us for this summer’s UCL Rare-Books Club Online, every Tuesday lunchtime, to hear the winner and finalists discuss their collections and present some of their books, starting on 14 July with Alexandra Plane, introduced by Anthony Davis.

Judges

The judges included representatives of the UK’s Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association, the UK’s Bibliographical Society, and Senate House Library who hosted the prize last year, as well as UCL Special Collections.

For the Special Collections team, it was also a great pleasure to collaborate this year with the founder of the prize, Anthony Davis, and to share his inspiring enthusiasm for books and collecting with the students. We hope many of them will continue to develop and cherish their collections long into the future.

 

The Pro-Vice-Provost’s View

Paul Ayris3 July 2020

UCL Library Committee

Library Committee met virtually on 25 June by Microsoft Teams. It was the probably the first time in the Committee’s long history that this distinguished body had not met physically in a committee room.

One of the items on the agenda was the termly Report from me as Pro-Vice Provost. The Report from the Pro-Vice-Provost  can be seen behind the link. I used the usual structure, reporting against the 6 KPIs of the current Library Strategy, but I fashioned the narrative to reflect the extraordinary events that we have all been experiencing.

The coronavirus crisis led to lockdown in UCL Library Services, with closure of library sites beginning on 17
March. With senior colleagues we quickly agreed a set of themes which would underpin our work:

1. Electronic-led resource provision to support research and education
2. Digitally-delivered teaching and skills support
3. Fully digital enquiry services, which require a proper enquiry management platform
4. Open Science as the model for the future
5. Optimization of learning spaces
6. Research collection strategy in a digital era

These values continue to underpin our work as we develop our service provision to embrace the principle of digital-first in both research and education. It is the move fully to embed digital delivery in our education offering which is exciting, supported by £1.38 million of new money to purchase e-textbooks and to upscale our work on ReadingLists@UCL.

I would like to use this opportunity further to underline the Library’s commitment to supporting colleagues in #BlackLivesMatter. I am, as many of you probably know, a Tudor historian who publishes on sixteenth-century England. I wish here to put on record my repugnance at the views on race expressed this week by another Tudor historian, Dr David Starkey. Starkey’s views are repugnant to me and are completely at variance with UCL’s position.

In Newsletter 12, published today, our colleague Amad Uddin has told us about his team’s experiences in re-opening the Student Centre. He says: ‘I feel proud that Library Services have been involved in the first pilot [in re-opening UCL spaces] as it’s crucial we get back to some sense of normality. We are pioneers, what we learn from this pilot, the good and bad, will help other buildings open in the near future as restrictions get eased.’

Stay well, stay safe and I hope we will all be able to meet again in UCL in the coming weeks.

Paul Ayris

Pro-Vice-Provost (UCL Library Services)

 

Liberating the Collections at UCL

utnvrev19 June 2020

As signalled in Ben’s Liblist message of 11th June 2020 we wanted to share a bit more detail about the work that has already happened in the area of ‘decolonising our collections’ and plans to develop and build on this work. There is a lot of activity in this area across the library and archives sector, many colleagues have attended events nationally related to this topic and there is a high level of interest and commitment to this area of work across the service.

Back in November 2019 a meeting was convened for all academic support staff interested or already engaged in themes around “decolonising” collections, at subject or site level, to consider the scope for activities in Library Services. The response was huge. We considered terminology and agreed we’d give this work the title of ‘Liberating the Collections’ so that it would complement the existing ‘Liberating the Curriculum’ work that UCL has undertaken. We also felt that the unintentional mis-use or misappropriation of the terms ‘decolonising’ or ‘decolonisation’ could be problematic.

Colleagues shared examples of work already being undertaken including:

Reclassification – recent projects

Art Reading Room, UCL Main Library (photo courtesy of Liz Lawes)

Tom Meehan (Head of Cataloguing & Metadata) spoke about a project initiated by Liz Lawes (Subject Liaison Librarian: Fine Art, History of Art, Film Studies, Small Press Collections) for the MX section of the ART collection, to change the classification of non-Western art from purely alphabetical-by-country to a logical arrangement using Garside’s standard geographical table. This followed on from a student enquiry and meant that African art in particular could be more effectively organised and less marginalised. The project involved mapping the former classmarks for 2000 items to new ones (in this case also recalculating Cutter numbers), making the changes to Alma holdings records, and physically relabelling and moving the books.

Wojciech Janik (Area Liaison Coordinator & Area Liaison Librarian for Russia, Ukraine, Belarus & Eurasia) shared details of similar reclassification work at SSEES library, undertaken to create new categories for materials from former Soviet republics which have been independent countries for almost 20 years. These had continued to be classified within the Russian collection which is politically problematic. There was a lot of interest in this work and it even resulted in a donation of books from the Georgian Ambassador.

Reading lists – modelling good practice

With planning for the new UCL East campus under way there is an objective to embed good ‘Liberating the Curriculum’ practice in new programmes from the outset. Hazel Ingrey (Head of Teaching & Learning Services) is working with academics to suggest inclusive, non-canon literature and viewpoints for the new reading lists that they will curate.

Change the Subject! – film screening at UCL

On 3 February 2020, Library Services co-sponsored the London premiere of this documentary, with UCL’s Department of Information Studies (DIS). The film narrates the story of a group of students at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire, USA, who challenged anti-immigrant sentiment as represented by the Library of Congress subject headings in the Library catalogue, and specifically the term ‘illegal alien’, used by academic libraries globally.

Open to attendees across the library sector, the screening was followed by a panel discussion where UCL was represented by Tom Meehan. The film is temporarily available to view https://www.pbs.org/video/change-the-subject-23nbpj/

Steps to Progress – facilitating and hosting a student initiative

Steps to Progress, UCL Main Library

In late 2018 a PhD student from UCL’s English Department approached the Library with a project he was developing, with the support of the Vice Provost International and other senior officers, to install decals of book spines to the stair risers leading to the Main Library that challenged existing perceptions of the literary canon and celebrated the diversity of the UCL community. Supported and enabled in liaison with library colleagues, the project came to fruition in early June 2019 https://blogs.ucl.ac.uk/libnet/2019/06/05/steps-to-progress-2/. It has received considerable attention and plaudits from both UCL and external visitors to the space.

Eugenics Inquiry – supported and informed by Library Services

In 2018, UCL’s President & Provost Professor Michael Arthur commissioned an ‘Inquiry into the History of Eugenics at UCL’, led by Professor Iyiola Solanke of the University of Leeds. Library Services supported the Inquiry through the Director of Operations acting as secretary, and Special Collections staff assisting with identification and provision of evidence drawn from the archives and records materials we hold. Learning and insight from this process has been shared with Library Services staff in the Peer Review https://www.ucl.ac.uk/libnet/news-social/peer-review/archive-2020/issue-168-02-march-2020 on 2 March 2020. The articles illustrate some of the discoveries made and implications for how our collections might be researched and presented in future.

Sustaining the Liberated Curriculum – Special Collections project

The Special Collections team have long been involved in Liberating the Curriculum work, the most recent example being a funded project to develop enhanced resources for archival handling and exploration to support teaching in the BA (Hons) Education Studies at the IOE. The focus of the project was the preservation and digitisation of historical materials used for teaching about groups whose experiences have often been marginalised in historical accounts of education – in this case girls and the science curriculum, multicultural and anti-racist education in the 1970s and 80s and disability and special educational needs (SEN). Although they can be accessed in person, the resources are now available to UCL students on Moodle and have been used to develop teaching and student research in these areas over the past 2 years.

Next steps: Liberating the Collections Steering Group

It was agreed that there is a lot more that we can do and that we needed to establish a group to plan and oversee strands of activity across Library Services, aligned to our Strategy, UCL’s Liberating the Curriculum initiative and with reference to best practice in the library sector.

The group will be meeting for the first time on the 15th July to agree terms of reference and decide the priorities for this work going forward. The group will report to the Collection Management Advisory Group (CMAG) and connect closely with the Library’s Equality, Diversity & Inclusion Committee.

It will be co-chaired by Rozz Evans (Head of Collection Strategy) and Kate Cheney (Head of Site Library Services and lead for the Staff Equality, Diversity and Inclusion Key Performance Area).

New support for library staff working towards HEA fellowship awards

Angela Young17 June 2020

HEA Fellowship awards provide a great opportunity for anyone who wants to demonstrate their commitment to professionalism in supporting learning and teaching in higher education. The UCL Arena Open programme, which is free to UCL staff, provides a route to Higher Education Academy (HEA) / AdvanceHE fellowship and is open to all staff at UCL who teach or support students’ learning, regardless of role or job title, so it’s relevant to all sorts of roles within Library Services. In addition to gaining you post-nominals, the process of applying means you reflect on your teaching and learning support work and develop your skills, identify areas for your future development and enhance your support of students so contributing to the user experience.

UCL Arena are launching a brand new course that is being delivered online this summer, specifically to support Professional Services staff, including Library Services staff. This is a great opportunity for anyone thinking of applying for Associate Fellowship or Fellowship. Details of the course are below.

Contributed by Angela Young.

Professional Services Staff – Pathway to Arena Fellowships

Course description:

Professional Services (PS) Staff make an important contribution to UCL’s mission, by providing training and support for learning. This course is a development pathway for PS Staff, leading (ideally) to the submission of an application for fellowship of the Higher Education Academy.

The course will enable you to think creatively about supporting teaching, learning, and assessment in your role. It will guide you in developing a fellowship application in a structured way over four synchronous, interactive sessions and through a variety of tasks. You will also have the opportunity to meet colleagues from different parts of UCL and to discuss how your experience maps to the UK Professional Standards Framework (UKPSF).

Learning outcomes:

By the end of this course, you should be able to:

  • identify ways in which your role and work experience supports high quality student learning and student outcomes
  • reflect on your professional practice and consider the ways it impacts on the learning of others
  • recognise the importance and value of your work and how it contributes to UCL’s operations and strategy
  • understand what a good UCL Arena fellowship application looks like
  • demonstrate how your experience and knowledge meet the relevant criteria of the UKPSF for the appropriate fellowship category

Dates/times of sessions:

  • Session 1: Thursday, 9 July 2020 (14.00 – 15.30)
  • Session 2: Tuesday, 21 July 2020 (14.00 – 15.30)
  • Session 3: Thursday, 6 August 2020 (10.00 – 11.30)
  • Session 4: Tuesday, 11 August 2020 (14.00 – 15.30) OR Wednesday, 16 September (11.00 – 12.30)

Who should apply:

This course is ideal for PS staff who have worked in higher education for at least two years and provide teaching and student support. It is most suitable for (but not restricted to) PS staff who work in programme/teaching administration, digital education, library services, teaching laboratories, and student wellbeing.

How to register:

Please complete this form by 5pm on Monday, 29 June, if you are interested in participating in this course:

We can only accept a maximum of 20 people for this course and will be confirming places on a “first come, first serve basis”. We will confirm your place on the course by 6 July 2020.

Please be aware that there will be a little bit of preparation to do before the first session and ‘homework’ to do between each session. We’ll be targeting Associate Fellow applications, but with scope for Fellow application development if participants have the appropriate experience.

UCL Library Services Summer School 2020 – bookings now open!

Angela Young18 May 2020

The UCL Library Services Staff Summer School is a series of training and development sessions, events and online activities aimed at library staff from across UCL Library Services, to support them in answering enquiries and in providing support, training and advocacy to library users and stakeholders.

For the first time this year, the entire programme will be delivered online, with a mixture of self-paced online learning and real-time, ‘live’ sessions.

The programme this year has a variety of sessions, running throughout June and July:

Self-directed online training:

  • Introduction to Open Science (1 June – 10 July, self-directed online training). An introduction to this key area of our library strategy. Each week a new real-world problem will be addressed.

Real-time, ‘live’ online training sessions:

  • Accessible Word and PowerPoint templates training (2 June, 10.30-11.30): Learn how to use Library Services templates developed to help you meet new accessibility regulations.
  • Health librarianship in a pandemic (10 June, 11.00-12.30): Discover what it’s like being a health librarian during the current COVID-19 crisis, with contributions from library staff at Public Health England and colleagues from our libraries which support NHS Trusts.
  • Launch of the Systematic Reviews and Advanced Literature Searching Network (23 June, 11.00-12.00). Are you involved in any aspect of supporting systematic reviews or advanced database searching? Or would you like to develop your professional skills in this area? Join this session to help shape how we support each other.
  • Social Media for Professional Development (29 June, 14.00-15.00). Find out more about social media tools and how they can be used for professional development.
  • Liaison Librarians Panel Session (30 June, 10.00-11.30). Gain an insight into what it is like to be a liaison librarian.
  • Live online training experience (7 July, 10.00-11.30): A chance for participants to take control and experience delivering live online training using Blackboard Collaborate.

Full details of the programme, including how to book, are available on the Library Services Summer School Moodle Course. If you do not already have access, please email libraryskills@ucl.ac.uk for an enrolment key. Sessions are open to all UCL Library Services staff, with the permission of your line manager.

Angela Young, Head of Library Skills

HEA Fellowship congratulations

Angela Young7 May 2020

Many congratulations to Zoe Thomas (Senior Library Assistant: Library Skills) who has just been awarded Fellowship of the Higher Education Academy via the UCL Arena Open programme. This is well-deserved recognition of her experience, dedication and commitment to delivering excellence in teaching our students.

 

If you have also recently achieved any categories of Fellowship, please let me know so we can have a full picture of the achievements of Library Services staff.

 

What is HEA Fellowship?

HEA fellowship is a nationally recognised award which gives you formal recognition for your commitment to professionalism in supporting learning and teaching in higher education? The UCL Arena Open programme, which is free to UCL staff, provides a route to Higher Education Academy (HEA) / AdvanceHE fellowship and is open to all staff at UCL who teach or support students’ learning, regardless of role or job title, so it’s relevant to all sorts of roles within Library Services. In addition to gaining you post-nominals, the process of applying means you reflect on your teaching and learning support work and develop your skills, identify areas for your future development and enhance your support of students so contributing to the user experience.

 

Working towards HEA Fellowship in lockdown

Our current circumstances are making us all reflect on how we can best continue to deliver teaching and provide support for learning to our students, and to develop new ways of doing so. This may provide lots of examples for you to draw on as evidence to support a fellowship application. Some of you might also find you have more time to reflect and write your application.

 

Fellowship assessment through UCL Arena Open is continuing as normal so there is no need to delay applications.

 

Find out more on the UCL Arena Open website, or contact Angela Young, who arranges support events and individual support for colleagues within Library Services.

 

Angela Young (Head of Library Skills)

 

World Earth Day 2020 and sustainable initiatives at the Institute of Orthopaedics Library.

simon.bralee.1522 April 2020

Wednesday 22nd April 2020 is World Earth Day. Across the world, individuals and organisations mark the day through participating in various ‘green, sustainable and environmentally friendly’ practices.

The mission of World Earth Day is: “To build the world’s largest environmental movement to drive transformative change for people and planet”.

Every year there is a theme to mark the day, and this year the theme is Climate Action. Furthermore, this year World Earth Day is going digital, and there is a digital interactive world map, which people can visit to see what virtual events are taking place across the world to mark World Earth Day.

Sustainable Stanmore

In line with World Earth Day 2020, the Institute of Orthopaedics Library Team would like to share the green and sustainable initiatives we have participated in.

Prior to the remote working, we were involved in Fairtrade Fortnight 2020. The Fairtrade Foundation supports local farmers and communities through a range of initiatives. They also focus on protecting the environment, ensuring farmers have good soil and water quality which is important for communities and the environment.

In addition, on the 17th March 2020 our plants – the Oxilis and the Joseph Coat plants (scientific name of the plant is Amaranthus gangeticus) were ‘adopted’ by team colleagues – Jas, Danny and Beth. They are now very happy and flourishing in their new homes during the remote working period.

Below are comments from the team about Fairtrade Fortnight and our library plants.

Veronica Parisi (Acting Librarian)

Throughout Monday 24th February to Sunday 8th March, the Institute of Orthopaedics Library was involved in the Fairtrade Fortnight and several activities were organised to engage library users as well as library staff to raise awareness about Fairtrade.

The library provided an information stand at the entrance where users could read more about Fairtrade while sipping a complimentary Fairtrade tea, coffee and tasting delicious Fairtrade chocolate.

Library users also took part in fun and informative activities such as ‘storybombing’. This was a story hunt where users had to find in the library 5 different thought-provoking stories about the lives and conditions of women cocoa farmers. Once the stories had been found, users were celebrated with a sticker and Fairtrade Chocolate at the library desk.

Two library staff Fairtrade food and bake events were also organised where staff brought in homemade chocolate cookies, courtesy of our baker Maryam, and treats made only with Fairtrade products. Our baker Maryam also shared some delicious Fairtrade recipes from Fairtrade Foundation and the Co-Op. For pancakes lovers, there are some great ideas for Fairtrade topping .

This was an enjoyable and informative two-week period and it was rewarding to engage with library users in different ways whilst contributing to raise awareness about Fairtrade.

Maryam Ali (Library Assistant)

It was great to organise the Fairtrade Fortnight event at the Institute of Orthopaedics library. The main purpose was to raise awareness about Fairtrade and the work the Fairtrade Foundation does in an engaging, fun and informative way.

It was wonderful to see our users stop by at the Fairtrade Fortnight Information stand, speak to library staff about Fairtrade, the Fairtrade products, how they can get involved in the ‘Storybombing’ activity and tell us how good the Fairtrade Coffee tasted! We used biodegradable cups to try to make the event as sustainable as possible, and encouraged staff and students to bring their own cups too.

I also learnt more about the work the Fairtrade Foundation does, and the range of Fairtrade products available.

Library staff tweeted throughout Fairtrade Fortnight to raise awareness. Thank you to everyone who supported and participated during Fairtrade Fortnight.

Fairtrade stand Fairtrade Stand

Roberta Wiseman (Senior Library Assistant)

I enjoyed the Fairtrade Fortnight event organised by Maryam (who made some very delicious biscuits!), and feel that my awareness of the work of the Fairtrade Foundation has increased.

It is important that everyone is paid appropriately for their labour, and that people all over the world have access to healthcare, education, and the opportunity for a happy life.

I also enjoyed the excitement of having a scavenger hunt in the library throughout the fortnight, with chocolate prizes.  I think our users appreciated it too!

Danny Williams (Evening & Weekend Library Assistant)

I participated in the ‘storybombing’ activity mentioned above. I hid the second one of the StoryBomb leaflets on one of the library shelves, informing work colleagues of where I hid it. I then posted a tweet on the Orthopaedics Library’s Twitter account, informing library users of the leaflet. I also brought in a bar of Sainsbury’s milk chocolate, which had a Fairtrade logo on it, for use by library staff.

I am currently looking after one of the Orthopaedics Library’s potted plants whilst working from home, and until the library re-opens. It’s an Oxilis, with crimson-colour leaves, and I water it once a week. It also gets plenty of sunlight.

Photo of Oxilis

Oxilis

Elizabeth Metz (Evening Senior Library Assistant)

I was delighted to offer a temporary home to one of the Joseph’s Coat plants, which is thriving in its new home!

Photo of Joseph’s Coat plant

Joseph’s Coat plants

Further information

World Earth Day 2020

Fairtrade Foundation

Written by the Institute of Orthopaedics Library Team: Veronica, Jas, Ma’ali, Elizabeth, Roberta, Danny and Maryam.

orth-libary@ucl.ac.uk