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Ophthalmic Nursing exhibition at Royal College of Nursing

Debbie CHeatlie7 August 2019

Moorfields Nurse Consultant, Nicola Dunlop, with the assistance of Debbie Heatlie, Librarian of the Joint Library of Ophthalmology, arranged an exhibition on Ophthalmic Nursing at the RCN Library, running until November 2019.

The exhibition features books on ophthalmic nursing practice from the RCN collection and artefacts used by nurses on loan from the Moorfields Eye Hospital Museum, including Eagle Eye ointment, an early ophthalmoscope, an artificial leech and leech holder and coloured glass dropper bottles.  If you are wondering what the teapot was used for, please visit to find out.

A photo of Nurse Agnes Lansdell and her husband Herbert Crookes reveals a fascinating story of her life. Agnes trained and worked at the London Metropolitan Hospital (Hoxton) and the Royal London Ophthalmic Hospital (Moorfields) where she met her future husband whilst he was receiving treatment for shrapnel injuries to the eye sustained during the Battle of the Somme.

Entrance to the exhibit is free.  Royal College of Nursing Library, 20 Cavendish Square, London, W1G 0RN.  Located behind John Lewis in Oxford Street.

Opening hours: Mon – Fri  09:00 – 19:00 ; Saturday 09:00 – 17:00 ; Sunday Closed.

 

 

UCL research data repository publishes its first outputs

TinaJohnson14 June 2019

UCL researchers can now publish, archive and share data, code and other outputs supporting published research in UCL’s new institutional research data repository (RDR).

research data repository

UCL’s new research data repository

First repository dataset published 5 June

On 5 June, UCL researchers, Library Services, ISD and Figshare staff celebrated two years’ preparation and the launch of the new university repository.  The very first upload: an mp4 laparoscopy video of Vesalius’ De humani corporis fabrica is part of an interdisciplinary Special Collections – Digitisation Suite collaboration.

Main features of the service

The UCL research data repository (RDR) service is free, open access and cloud-based with UCL single sign-on, and offers 10 year preservation in almost any file format.

Other features include embargo and integration with GitHub – and UCL Research Publications Service later this year, saving effort on REF submissions.  The institutional repository offers additional features over the commercial Figshare service: greater storage (50GB for individuals and 100GB for groups), larger file uploads (5GB), team project collaborations and metrics analysis and reporting.

The secret to a fast and painless repository experience

Testers found the repository intuitive: easy to log in, browse, and find, view and download items.  Uploading and describing an item takes minutes once the files and metadata are ready.  The trick is to prepare in advance:  good file names, a summary description, co-authors and their ORCIDs, keywords, the grant code, URLs or DOIs of linked research, and copyright licence codes.  A quick guide, detailed guide and FAQs are available on the Research Data Management webpages.

Once checked and approved (within 3 working days), each published item receives a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) to make it easy to share, discover and cite.

Researchers are responsible for compliance with funder policies, intellectual property/copyright and GDPR leglisation.  Personal data is not accepted in the repository at present unless completely anonymised or pseudonymised.

The Research Data Repository service is supported jointly by:

More guidance is available on the Research Data Management Repository webpages and in the Research Data Repository FAQs.

Contact: researchdatarepository@ucl.ac.uk for questions, support, comments and feedback.

Data sharing is necessary for reproducible researchFAIR data and major funder compliance.  The new UCL research data repository is part of the university’s investment in infrastructure to enable Open Science practice across the university.

Join the UCL reproducibility mailing list for news and updates, invitations for input and training.

Further reading

Pro-Vice-Provost’s View

PaulAyris13 June 2019

Visit of Carlos Moedas, European Commissioner for Research, Science and Innovation

On Thursday 13 June 2019, the EU Commissioner for Research, Science and Innovation, Carlos Moedas, visited UCL with members of his cabinet.

The purpose of the Commissioner’s presence was to re-visit those European universities to which he feels especial affinity. He leaves his position in the autumn of 2019 once the new European Commission takes office.

As Pro-Vice-Provost with a responsibility for co-ordinating Open Science across UCL, I was asked to address him in the Provost’s Office to outline the success that UCL has had in introducing Open Science practice across the institution. I also highlighted the challenges in Europe in moving to embrace Open Science principles. This is the text which I used in my talk, sitting next to the Commissioner as I spoke.

Successes

  1. UCL Press is the UK’s first fully OA University Press. We have published 106 monographs with over 2 million downloads – when conventional sales over the bookshop counter might result in 200 sales per title. Our most downloaded book is from Professor Danny Miller in Anthropology in UCL, How the World Changed Social Media, which has been downloaded over 300,000 times. This shows the transformative effect of OA monograph publishing.
  2. We have also launched a megajournal platform – with the first subject section being the Environment. This has Open Peer review and the submission is made available immediately as Green OA in a Pre-Print repository prior to peer review and final publication.
  3. We have just launched our Open UCL Research Data repository for academics to archive their research data for sharing and re-use.
  4. UCL Discovery is the institutional OA repository. We monitor OA compliance from the Faculties on a monthly basis and have compliance rates as high as 90%. UCL Discovery has just passed the 20 million download mark.
  5. From 2000-2016, Digital Science has shown that UCL is consistently the university in the Russell Group in the UK most engaged with OA.
  6. We have also launched a pilot Open Educational Resources repository to collect educational materials for sharing and re-use.
  7. We have a pan-UCL Open Science governance platform, which monitors the introduction of Open Science principles and practices across the institution; and we lead work in Open Science in LERU (League of European Research Universities).
  8. UCL is one of the first universities anywhere in Europe to include Open Access to publications, research data and software, as a core principle in our academic promotions framework. This policy was signed off and published in 2018.

Challenges and how UCL can help  

  1. Academic concerns with Plan S, not with Open Access, threaten to de-rail the advances made across Europe in Open Science practice. We would like to support Plan S by working with the Commission and others to make Alternative Publishing Platforms, on the model of UCL Press, a reality across Europe.
  2. Those who manage the European Open Science Cloud have not engaged with universities, indeed they ignore my calls for collaboration. UCL would like to work with the EOSC to determine rules of engagement for universities. We have considerable experience, running the DART-Europe portal for OA research theses, which aggregates metadata for 619 universities and provides access to over 800,000 full-text research theses in 28 countries.
  3. The Commission’s Open Science Policy Platform work on Next Generation Metrics is badly stalled and needs a kick for it to produce a set of Recommendations which can be embraced by the global academy. UCL could help as we are out to informal consultation on an institutional Bibliometrics policy, grounded in Open Science principles.
  4. UCL is attempting, with LERU and other partners, to build a pan-European community for Open Science; the Commission could help by providing opportunities for seed funding to encourage growth in community engagement. Open Science, after all, is about people not just principles and practice.

I gave the Commissioner a gift bag from UCL Press containing, amongst other things, a copy of Danny Miller’s How the World Changed Social Media, the most downloaded book from UCL Press. The Commissioner has asked me to follow up with him and his team on a number of the issues I raised. I will certainly be doing that.

Paul Ayris

Pro-Vice-Provost (UCL Library Services)

Creating Connections East: spaces available for event on 10th June

Benjamin G MMeunier24 May 2019

Creating Connections East: UK 2070 Commission on Inequalities

Monday 10 June 2019 15:00 – 17:00

Oxford House, Derbyshire Street, Bethnal Green, E2 6HG

Creating Connections is a regular networking event bringing people together from UCL with representatives of community organisations, charities, residents’ groups, social enterprises and statutory organisations. For our next event, we’re teaming up with the UK2070 Commission, an independent inquiry into social and economic inequality in the UK. We warmly invite you to join us.

 

We’ve still got some spaces available – find out more and sign up at studentsunionucl.org/volunteering/about/creating-connections/creating-connections-east

And if you know anyone else at UCL who might be interested, please do feel free to pass on this invitation.

Topics will include:

Local talent & skills: Come and talk to people interested in: how to nurture local skills, ensuring local talent is part of the economic future, support for vocational training, how universities can support local job markets, how we can help people overcome barriers to entering the workforce.

 

New technology: Come and talk to people interested in: how new technology can create new jobs, how the Voluntary and Community sector can benefit from new technology, how schools can prepare young people for technological change, how data science can be utilised by communities, what opportunities are there in clean tech?

 

Local cultural and sporting sectors: Come and talk to people interested in: how to engage under-represented groups in the cultural and sporting activities; what role universities have in the cultural and sporting sectors; the role of culture and sport in economic development.

 

Supporting projects for the future: Come and talk to people interested in: What types of projects would transform east London for long term success? What services and activities should local decision-makers focus on? What would success look like in east London?

 

This is a short networking event for people interested in these issues – a starting point for finding like-minded people you might want to collaborate with. It’s intended for experts, beginners and everyone in between. It’s not a conference and there won’t be long plenary speeches or workshops!

 

Light refreshments will be provided.

 

Find out more and register at:

studentsunionucl.org/volunteering/about/creating-connections/creating-connections-east

If you’ve any questions or comments about the event, contact John Braime at Students’ Union Volunteering Service (j.braime@ucl.ac.uk) , Briony Fleming in UCL’s Public Engagement Unit (b.fleming@ucl.ac.uk) or Lucy Natarajan from UCL / UK 2070 (lucy.natarajan@ucl.ac.uk)

 

Creating Connections East is organised by UCL’s Public Engagement Unit, Students’ Union UCL’s Volunteering Service and The UK2070 Commission

Research Data Repository launch 5 June

TinaJohnson17 May 2019

UCL is set to launch its new Research Data Repository. This service enables UCL researchers to publish research datasets, make them discoverable and citable, meet funder requirements and store data long-term.  Preserving and sharing digital assets are FAIR data principles – key components of research replicability and open scholarship.

UCL Research Data RepositoryRegister to join us on Wednesday 5 June 5 – 7pm and find out more about the Repository.

Institute of Education, W3.01 IOE, 20 Bedford Way, London, WC1H 0AL  View Map

This event, introduced by Paul Ayris (Pro-VP-UCL Library Services), will include an update on on Open Science developments at UCL, a live repository demonstration and the opportunity to ask questions.

More about the UCL Research Data Repository from the Research Data Management team:

Get involved in reproducible research

Library blogposts on open science and research reproducibility:

 

 

UCL Open Science Day 23 May – Join us

TinaJohnson14 May 2019

All staff and students – UCL and external – are welcome to attend the UCL Open Science Day on 23 May at the IOL.  This is a free workshop on developing open scholarship at UCL.

Thursday 23 May 2019 9.30 – 4pm

This event is now fully booked.  Read more about the Open Science Day 2019  programme and speakers.

Logan Hall, Institute of Education (IOE), 20 Bedford Way, London, WC1H 0AL  View Map

Blogposts on Open Science and Open Scholarship:

This blog was updated 22 May.

UCL Ways of Working

Benjamin G MMeunier9 May 2019

Last week, UCL launched the new behavioural framework for professional services staff, UCL Ways of Working.

The framework enables individuals, teams and leaders to set clear expectations, support development, have quality conversations and be their best in the workplace. The nine Ways of Working are clustered around three central themes:

The framework was built for and by colleagues working in professional services roles across UCL, from faculties, departments, institutes, other academic units, offices of Vice-Provosts (including Library Services ) and central services.

The UCL Ways of Working Wheel (see below) and Descriptors provide a simple overview of the central Ways of Working, outlining how we work consistently, successfully and happily as an integrated professional services community. Supporting indicators and steps to development are then detailed for each grade and these can be used to support appraisal conversations, induction and probation meetings, and in recruitment – writing adverts, job descriptions and preparing for interviews. Detailed guidance is available on how to use the UCL Ways of Working.


The UCL Ways of Working are closely aligned to our values:

“UCL Library Services is empowering our staff and our users. Our staff are skilled and knowledgeable experts.

We are community-minded, inclusive and innovative. Our approach to service is professional, responsive and friendly. We are proud of our service, and we are honest and transparent.

Our strategy presents our goals to be cutting-edge, visionary and eco-friendly.”

How are we addressing the issues raised in the last Staff Survey?

Benjamin G MMeunier7 May 2019

Following the 2017 Staff Survey, Library Services established a new group to coordinate a response and address the issues which were impacting on Library Services staff. This group is the Staff Survey Action Group. The Group devised a Staff Survey Action Plan, which was signed off by the Library Senior Management Team and is being implemented. You can view progress against the actions at the link above.


As one example of an initiative developed in response to the Staff Survey, ‘Welcome to Library Services’ sessions were introduced with Paul Ayris and some SMT members since November 2018. This allows new starters to meet SMT members, and get a sense of the libraries’ key priorities, and also an opportunity for SMT members to get to know new members of the Library. It will become part of the induction process for LS staff, in a similar way to the Provost’s Welcome. To help staff understand Library Services’ place in UCL, new charts have been made available on LibNet to illustrate the Library’s place in the Office of the Vice-Provost (Research) and how the Library reports to UCL Council, the university’s governing body, via Library Committee.

Another need identified from the Staff Survey was to provide accessible formal procedures, implementation and monitoring within Library Services on bullying and harassment. This was done last December with guidance on how to respond if you witness bullying or harassment. This has since been complemented by the UCL Full Stop campaign, calling on our community to come together and say Full Stop to unacceptable behaviour.

Thirdly, as a final example, the Staff Survey highlighted Leadership and Staff Engagement as an area for improvement within Library Services. This has been a significant area where Library managers have taken action through the engagement of Library staff in developing our new strategy, through visits to Library sites and through training schemes to enable Library staff to thrive in the fast-changing environment we operate in. The Library SMT discussed how we might engage more effectively with colleagues at an Away Day in December. We have established a working group to look at making the work of SMT more transparent. We are also exploring ways for colleagues across the service to be able to share the challenges of working in Library Services and raise issues that concern them.  Further information will be forthcoming in the next few months.

All of this work would not have been possible without the members of the Staff Survey Action Group, including Library Services staff and representatives from UNISON. Members attend quarterly meetings and analysed the Staff Survey results last year and continue feed in contributions, in terms of what measures would help to improve the work environment. Members also liaise with Library colleagues on the work of the Staff Survey Action Plan.

There is still a way to go before the actions are all delivered, so that the issues which were identified in 2017 are effectively addressed. If you would like to get involved, there are currently 3 vacancies on the Staff Survey Action Group. If you are willing to devote half-a-day a term to help make UCL Library Services a better place to work, please speak to your line manager to obtain approval and contact me to join. Colleagues at all grades and from all sites across Library Services are welcome to get involved. Find out more about the Staff Survey Action Group on LibNet.

Collette E MLawrence24 April 2019

Building Team blog – Summer Projects 2019

If you have any queries regarding projects please contact Jay james.woodhouse@ucl.ac.uk

The Library has secured funding for four projects from the Central Estates Strategy Board (CESB) for this summer. These are:

Science Library – To create a new accessible toilet to be installed on the ground floor. This will include with a hoist and changing facilities. To be undertaken as soon as possible at the start of the summer, the project is likely to take fourteen weeks.

Graduate Hub, South Wing – Refurbish the main room and kitchenette. This area will become more study focused with individual study spaces, rather than sofas. The Kitchenette and Main room will be redecorated, new floor covering and all new furniture. In the computer room the chairs will be replaced. The duration of this project will be ten weeks.

Senate House Hub – This will repurpose the Senate House hub into a Post Graduate Research (PGR) only space. The front half of the space will be for PGR, while the rear area will be for funded Centre for Doctorial Training (CDT). Some of the existing furniture will be relocated within the space, with some new furniture and an additional card controlled door. The duration of this project will be ten weeks.

Institute of Education – The entrance will be refurbished with new turnstiles and a combined Library/ISD service desk, similar to the Science Library Learning Lab Help point installed last year. Smart Shelves will be installed, this is an alternative to an auto sorter. The duration of the project six weeks towards the end of the summer.

Library design and European collaboration

Benjamin G MMeunier10 April 2019

Earlier this year, I was honoured to be invited to join the LIBER Architecture Group (LAG), as the UK representative. I am replacing Karen Latimer, former Librarian of Queen’s University Belfast and an expert in library design and heritage architecture. The group furthers the exchange of experience between librarians and architects throughout Europe and attempts to raise the level of awareness of new projects and trends. This is done through biennial seminars, and via a database of Library Buildings in Europe documenting new buildings, renovations, refurbishments and extensions. The LIBER Architecture Group brings librarians together with building design professionals, and helps to focus concepts and planning processes and to share best practice in the sector. It operates as part of LIBER’s Strategic Direction on Research Infrastructure.

As the UK’s future relationship with the European Union continues to be under question, UCL is committed to maintaining close partnerships with European Higher Education and research organisations. The work we do in Library Services, in many areas across the service, involves work with European partners and I am pleased to be able to play a part in developing links with colleagues in the area of European library architecture.

On Monday, as part of the LIBER Architecture Group’s bi-annual meeting, I visited the National Library of Luxembourg, which is due to open in September 2019. The building is very nearly complete, and the move of collections is due in the coming weeks. It is a monumental building, and much of the construction sites I visited or saw in Luxembourg were on a large scale, reflecting the country’s ambitious plans to develop its knowledge economy.

The view inside the brand new National Library, opening in September

Façade of the National Library of Luxembourg

When it opens, the library will provide 470 study spaces, open to anyone over the age of 14. The library building was designed to meet best practice in sustainable construction, using geothermal energy and thermal mass to maintain stable environmental conditions. Storage space at the back of the building provides shelving for 300,000 items. Where collections are on open access, each shelf is fitted with an LED light strip, creating an almost theatrical feel but also practical way of ensuring that users can see clearly even when browsing the lowest shelves in a building where there is little ceiling lights (for environmental reasons and also to minimise the risk of fire).

Facilities within the library include a music room and family study room, where parents may undertake their research accompanied by young children. The library also has parking spaces for 2 “Bicherbus”, the national library bus, which travels across the country to support users in Luxembourg.

View of Luxembourg Learning Centre, at the centre of Luxembourg University’s new campus on the former steelworks

The Luxembourg Learning Centre is based within an old coal warehouse, at the foot of two huge steelwork chimneys. It is at the heart of the new Science City in Belval, about half an hour from the centre of Luxembourg City. During my visit, I learned that Luxembourg’s economy was severely affected by the loss of the steel industry in the 1970s and had to transform its economy into the financial hub it is today. However, the country is keen to diversify its economy and avoid relying entirely on the finance sector, so it is fast developing its science and innovation sector.

The Belval site is being redeveloped with EUR 1 billion already invested and a further EUR 900 million due to be injected by the government to transform this former industrial plant into a university campus associated with a wider cultural and entrepreneurial district. The industrial past is everywhere to be seen, with the plant and warehouse buildings now listed as monuments.

The Learning Centre is a high-tech library which supports around 7,000 students at the university. With 1,000 study spaces and built at a cost of around EUR 70 million, it is on a scale fit to support further growth of the university. Collections are in English, French and German, reflecting the multilingual nature of the country. Signposts on the campus are in French but all the signage in the library is in English, a decision the Library took to ensure that the majority of users could easily navigate the building. There is a welcome point and self-service RFID equipment, provided by Bibliotheca, at the entrance. The library operates with a relatively small team (24 staff in total), and their Customer Service team work closely with students on various UX projects. The library closes at night and is also closed at weekends, and they are looking at extending these hours in response to demand. For more information, including a video of the impressive building, you can visit the website of the Luxembourg Learning Centre.

The next LIBER Architecture Group seminar will be held in April 2020 and hosted at the Luxembourg Learning Centre. Further details will be circulated later this year.

Futuristic furniture and hi-tech equipment feature throughout the Learning Centre, such as these built-in tablets to provide access to national newspapers

The Learning Centre’s glass walls are wrapped around the original structure of the coal warehouse which fed the steelworks