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  • Specimen of the Week 260: the handy man

    By Will J Richard, on 7 October 2016

    Hello internet! Will Richard here, picking another favourite from the Grant Museum’s shelves. And this time I’ve chosen a close relative and probably the first ape to move beyond punching with rocks. It’s the…

    LDUCZ-Z2017 Homo habilis skull model

    LDUCZ-Z2017 Homo habilis skull model

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    Specimen of the Week 255: the cottonmouth head

    By Will J Richard, on 2 September 2016

    Hello! Will Richard here blogging away to bring you another specimen of the week. And this one is an excellent example of the classic head in a jar. Timeless.

    LDUCZ-X1336 preserved cottonmouth head

    LDUCZ-X1336 preserved cottonmouth head

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    Specimen of the Week 251: the electric eel

    By Will J Richard, on 5 August 2016

    Hello blog-folks. Will Richard here picking another favourite from the 68,000 options that make up the Grant Museum. And this time it’s a shocker. Literally.

    LDUCZ-V252 preserved electric eel

    LDUCZ-V252 preserved electric eel

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    Specimen of the Week 245: The peregrine falcon skull

    By Will J Richard, on 24 June 2016

    Hello folks! Will Richard here bringing you a record breaking specimen of the week. It is part of our Best of the Beasts trail and by the end of this blog I hope you’ll all see why. It’s the…

    LDUCZ-Y1721 peregrine falcon skull

    LDUCZ-Y1721 peregrine falcon skull

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    Best of the Beasts

    By Will J Richard, on 9 May 2016

    Best of the Beasts

    There are about 7,000 animals or bits of animals on display in the museum and we know that can sometimes be a bit overwhelming. So to help some of our young (and young at heart) visitors navigate their way round the collection we’re proud to launch Best of the Beasts, our free new activity trail. And you get to learn some pretty extreme animal facts on the way round too. Ever wanted to know which of our 68,000 specimens is the…

     

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    Specimen of the week 238: the bisected red panda head

    By Will J Richard, on 6 May 2016

    Hello! Will Richard here. This week I’ve chosen one of our bisected heads. They came to the Grant Museum from the Ferens Institute of Otolaryngology in 1991 and were originally collected (and studied) by Sir Victor Negus who literally wrote the book(s) on noses and throats. I like to think that this specimen was particularly helpful. It’s the…

    LDUCZ-Z2273 bisected red panda head

    LDUCZ-Z2273 bisected red panda head

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    How and why did these animals die?

    By Will J Richard, on 27 April 2016

    Something which I get asked a lot by the Grant Museum’s visitors is “how did these animals die?” It’s an excellent question and one to which I wish there were a more comfortable answer. Or, at least, a more definite one. The truth is that it isn’t one size fits all. Not all of our specimens ended up here in the same way and for many we can only guess. The Grant Museum holds one of the UK’s oldest zoological collections and attitudes and practices have certainly changed over the last 200 years, though the ethical debates continue.

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    Specimen of the Week 233: The mouse-deer skeleton

    By Will J Richard, on 1 April 2016

    Hello Grant-fans! Will Richard again, taking my turn to bring you specimen of the week. Here goes…

    LDUCZ-Z523 Mouse-deer skeleton

    LDUCZ-Z523 mouse-deer skeleton

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    Specimen of the week 227: the Indian cobra skull

    By Will J Richard, on 19 February 2016

    Hello blog-heads! Will Richard here tapping out another specimen of the week on my trusty keyboard. And this time I’ve picked out a pretty dangerous customer from Case 16. I’m not an ophidiophobe, though according to Wikipedia about one in three of us are, but this is certainly not a snake I’d like to tangle with.

    LDUCZ-X167 Indian cobra skull

    LDUCZ-X167 Indian cobra skull

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    Specimen of the week 221: The mega-toothed shark tooth

    By Will J Richard, on 4 January 2016

    LDUCZ-V1301 fossil megalodon tooth

    LDUCZ-V1301 fossil megalodon tooth

    Hello and a Happy New Year to you Grant-fans. So, the first specimen of the week of 2016 falls to me, Will Richard. And I’ve chosen a monster to kick off the year: possibly the biggest ever fish with teeth to match. This one was found on the 2nd January 1880 (seasonal!) but people have been puzzling over these dental discards for generations. They were originally believed to be the dried tongues of dragons but actually I think the truth might be scarier…

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