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  • Specimen of the Week: Week 175

    By Tannis Davidson, on 18 February 2015

    Scary-Monkey-Week-Nine Less than two weeks ago, the first batch of newly-conserved skeletons from our Bone Idols project returned to the Grant Museum after their completed restoration work.

    Reg the Rhino -the largest skeleton in the Museum – was treated in this group and has now been remounted in fine form back on his plinth.

    Homecoming celebrations continued with the unpacking of several smaller primate skeletons such as the juvenile orang-utan, one of the chimpanzees, and this week’s Specimen of the Week… (more…)

    The Return of the Rhino: Conserving our biggest skeleton

    By Jack Ashby, on 10 February 2015

    In November, we announced that Reg the (hornless) Indian one-horned rhino skeleton was being dismantled and taken away for an extreme make-over (read Dismantling Reg the Rhino in Ten Easy Steps). Now he has returned in much better shape (specifically, rhino-shaped), prepared for a long and prosperous future in the Museum.

    The rhino after treatment. We hope you'lll agree he is much more rhino shaped.

    The rhino after treatment. We hope you’lll agree he is much more rhino shaped.

    Reg, a Bone Idol

    The rhino was among the first specimens included in our huge conservation project Bone Idols: Protecting our Iconic Skeletons, which will secure the long-term future of 39 of our biggest, rarest and most significant specimens. Some will be cleaned of 180 years of particulate pollutants, some will be repaired, some have new cases built, and some, like the rhino, will be completely remounted.

    What was wrong with the rhino?

    (more…)

    If I were a woodlouse

    By Emma-Louise Nicholls, on 28 January 2014

     

    If I were a woodlouse, I would stick to wood,

    And I would only go, where I know a woodlouse should,

    I wouldn’t stick my head, into a bird’s leg-bone,

    I wouldn’t use just anything, in which to make a home,

    ‘Cause the problem you might find, once you’ve wriggled in,

    Is that over time you grew larger, and the bone becomes too thin,

    So even if you turn around, and head back whence you came,

    You may find that,

    You’ve grown too fat,

    And have to die of shame.

     

    Emma-Louise Nicholls is the Curatorial Assistant at the Grant Museum of Zoology