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  • Archive for December, 2013

    Egypt on the Page: The Changing faces of Religion

    By Edmund Connolly, on 6 December 2013

    The ever popular and ever sold out (although some tickets left for the 13th December screening) Petrie Film club chronicles the application of Egypt in just some of the many cinematic and TV masterpieces that have turned to pyramids, mummies and anthropomorphic deities for their stimuli. Moving pictures are all very well, but I am a bookish type and prefer the idea of lounging by a fire with some sort of paged item, reading away. Terry Pratchett’s Pyramids certainly struck a chord with me, considering it in relation to the Petrie Collection and the concept of Ancient Egyptian religion and the changes it underwent.

    Pratchett, Pyramids (1989)  copyright: amazon.co.uk

    Pratchett, Pyramids (1989) copyright: amazon.co.uk

    (more…)

    Reflections on Kevin Guyan’s work and Black Bloomsbury events at UCL Art Museum

    By Helen R Cobby, on 6 December 2013

    Kevin Guyan speaking with participants on his Bloomsbury walking tour, outside Paramount Court

    Kevin Guyan speaking with participants on his Bloomsbury walking tour, outside Paramount Court

    Throughout this term, Kevin Guyan, PhD candidate at the UCL history department, has been working with the Art Museum to create events that compliment the current ‘Black Bloomsbury’ exhibition. His own research has allowed him to take themes from the exhibition in thoughtful and unusual directions for these workshops at the Museum. His events have included interactive investigations around 1940s music and dance, and exploring ideological boundaries within the Bloomsbury area through a walking tour.

    Kevin’s own research explores how domestic spaces impacted upon the production and reproduction of masculinities in the post war period (c.1945 – 1966). Although this work focuses on a different time period to ‘Black Bloomsbury’, (1945-1966 rather than 1918-1948), he has drawn upon common themes running through both eras, including space and identity, and methodologies of how historians perceive and ‘see’ into the past. For a more detailed analysis of his research and its links to the ‘Black Bloomsbury’ exhibition, please see his article ‘Engaging with Black Bloomsbury’, published on the Student Engagers website here.

    Curious to hear more about his work and the way he thinks up – and thinks about – the nature of his events with the Art Museum, I asked him a few questions.  (more…)

    Oh bizarre gharial

    By Emma-Louise Nicholls, on 5 December 2013

     

     

     

     

    Oh you bizarre gharial you, how I love your features

    With the thinnest (relative) snout, of the Animal Kingdom’s creatures

    One of the largest species, of all the world’s croc-kind

    You’re really quite unique, when all your features are combined

    Your legs so weak and measly, can’t get your body off the ground

    And your only real defence, is a puny hissss-ing sound (more…)

    Natural history under the hammer

    By Mark Carnall, on 4 December 2013

    Recently there have been a spate of high profile auctions of natural history specimens raising many issues about ownership, the value we should or shouldn’t put on natural history and the relationship between professional scientists, museums, amateurs and private collectors. My colleague Jack Ashby wrote about the recent dodo bones that were auctioned. Colleagues Dave Hone and Mark Graham give a balanced view of the recent sale of a Diplodocus skeleton over at the Guardian. The ‘duelling dinosaurs’ fossil was estimated to reach $9 million at auction in New York and last year the controversial proposed sale of an allegedly illicitly smuggled Tarbosaurus skeleton caused much debate.

    I thought I’d add my thoughts on the subject here, in particular about the relationship between collectors, museums and ethics. (more…)

    Specimen of the Week: Week 112

    By Emma-Louise Nicholls, on 2 December 2013

    In a life changing move of progressionism, I have decided to do something a little different this week. I know, I know, “Noooo Emma, don’t do it, continuity is key!” I hear you cry. But do not fear my loyal follower (Mum) and other people who have come across this blog by accident, I promise you this is going to. rock. your. world. Rather than look at a single species, we are going to go on a journey of poisonings, lies, and masters of subterfuge. This week’s Specimen of the Week is… (more…)