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Getting into Publishing – Event Round-up and Top Tips

ManpreetDhesi9 December 2015

Our Getting into Publishing panel discussion on Tuesday 1st December 2015 provided attendees with fantastic insight into this sector including industry trends and hot topics, typical roles and responsibilities and how to stand out as an applicant. Catch up on key points from this discussion below and read about the panellists in attendance here.

> Panellists extolled the  benefits of gaining work experience in smaller and/or independent publishers where you can get varied hands on experience and insight. There are very limited places on graduate schemes with major trade publishers (for example, only 4 places at HarperCollins) so being open to working in different roles in a wider range of publishing companies is encouraged at the start of your publishing career. Building up wide ranging work experience in different types of publishing companies is a positive. Don’t just go for trade publishing (it is considered by many the most glamourous) but consider other types, such as scientific manuals and journals, academic press or working at literary agents.
> Useful resources recommended for finding out about companies and hot topics in publishing are the Writers and Authors Yearbook, Bookseller (especially the jobs board) and The Society of Young Publishers. A useful event is the Futurebook annual conference.

> Don’t focus too much at this stage on getting a particular role in a particular company – it’s about trying to get a starting role. It’s a lot easier to change jobs within the industry once you’re in and move between imprints within a parent company. Try to be well-rounded and open to different roles at the start. At the very least, you’ll be able to appreciate what each job role does even if you aren’t good at it when you try it yourself – what makes someone good at one area (i.e. production) makes them terrible at another (sales)! agents.

> Be aware that you will start from the bottom, despite having a degree. Be humble and be prepared for the coffee making and photocopying, but also be enthusiastic and curious about what is going on more widely in the company. During any work experience strive to make the most of it and have a good attitude, as hiring often happens by referral and a remembrance of an awesome intern when vacancies come up in the company (“We have a editorial assistant job coming up – why don’t we contact X to see if they are still available, they were great!”)

> Build your awareness of which books and publications are linked to which publishers, their body of work, key successes. An industry trend is that many major publishing houses have acquired lots of smaller companies (called imprints).

> Key skills required for publishing roles are relationship management, project management and attention to detail. Relationship management examples were given of sending each bookstore manager a personalised book choice with an individual note, maintaining relationships with authors and with key individuals in different internal departments. A suggestion for building relationship skills is to listen to conversations during any work experience and see how publishing professionals deal with situations / respond to clients. Project management is also an important skill as essentially you will be looking after several projects simultaneously, for example various book launches.

> Nobody mentioned reading when discussing their jobs. Panellists stressed that you have to love reading to do the job but you won’t just be sat reading all day, there are lots of other parts of the role involved which make the reading happen for other people.

> Panel quote: “the written word is our life blood” – applications with any spelling or grammar mistakes will not be considered!

> Social media: look at your own presence and make it appealing (and free of bad English!) but also follow people in the industry and at the companies you’re applying for – learn about them, what they like, what they’re interested in, what they’re reading

> Some key industry changes and hot topics include
– the move to Open Access publications– academic publishers have been ahead of trade with this (and are with more new trends)
– major publishing houses have acquired lots of smaller companies (called imprints)
– e-books and digital are no longer seen as a separate division but is part of standard publishing
– Amazon has totally changed book purchasing but recently Bookouture are an interesting company to watch as a innovative competitor to Amazon
– publishers think of the customer as the end reader and not the bookstore, as buying tends to be much more end-consumer led
– budgets and cost are increasingly important as books will only be published if likely to be successful
– self-publishing is more prevalent but tend to be lower quality publications than those  published by established publishers.

> Two of the panellists now work as freelancers. With freelance work, you have to have an established base of clients and credibility, but your hours are your own. Most people move to freelance editing after building up contacts and a reputation in the industry.

– UCL Careers Media Week Team

8 Blogs written by Entrepreneurs worth checking out

ManpreetDhesi31 July 2015

This post orginially appeared on the Develop Your Career blog

Starting up a business is hard work.  You don’t always have time to build up your network, attend events and find good sources for advice. Blogs can be a good source of current and relevant information, particularly those by founders writing from direct experience.

This is a quick round up of blogs written by start up founders.

  1. Kate Kendall

Kate Kendall is founder and CEO of The Fetch, a hub for professionals to find local events. Kate’s blog charts the ups and downs of starting a business as well as digital culture, marketing and publishing. She has also been named one of the top 30 digital influencers in 2012.

  1. Joel Gascoyne

Joel Gascoyne, co-founder and CEO at Buffer, blogs about the lessons he learned along the way while setting up his business.

  1. Seth Godin

Most well known as a marketing guru, Seth Godin’s blog is loaded with juicy content on marketing, http://sethgodin.typepad.com/

  1. Clive Rich

Need to hone negotiating skills? Clive Rich, a leading UK negotiator, offers tips and articles on all this negotiation.

  1. Natalie MacNeil

She Takes on the World is aimed at women moving out of the corporate world and into their own business and takes a compassionate and feminine approach to business.

  1. James Altucher

Interesting blog by a trader, investor, writer and entrepreneur exploring not just business, but how it crosses over into life.

  1. OneStartups

Darmesh Shah is a software entrepreneur and co-founder and CTO of HubSpot, a software platform for Internet Marketing.

On OneStartups, Darmesh blogs about what it takes to succeed as a software startup.

  1. Founder Notes

Finding it all in one place, Founder Notes, is a community of start up founders who post, share and discuss the best content.

by Joanie Magill from The Careers Group Entrepreneurship Group