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New Moodle and New Module codes: update

By Hazel M Ingrey, on 3 August 2018

 

New module codes

In June we gave an outline of how TLS planned to manage this change to the new module codes.  Since then, the reading lists have rolled forward and TLS have started updating the module codes, using information from the Academic Model Project team. You don’t need to let us know which modules you would like updating: we are doing all online reading lists.  If any lists don’t have a new code, we will get in touch with departments to ask if they would like them left or archived

New Moodle

Moodle has been upgraded this summer and the ‘New Moodle‘ is already available, with the updated 2018-19 module codes.  For integrating with reading lists, New Moodle works in the same way as Legacy Moodle: you just need to switch on the ‘Library Resources’ block to make a link to the reading list. There is a more detailed integration which we will update this autumn, to ensure better interaction between Moodle and reading lists: ISD staff need to complete their prioirty Moodle migration work before doing this.  ‘Legacy Moodle’ is also still available for reference and also Late Summer Assessments.

 

Two possible problems:

  1. Students undertaking re-sit exams may wish to re-visit their former reading lists, if they haven’t saved a version.  Legacy Moodle won’t link to the 2017-18 reading list as these are now archived.  Students can search all current ReadingLits@UCL lists by module name; or if the list has been updated already, we can retrieve the previous version from the archive.
  2. The Library Resources block also contains a link to past exam papers.  All exam papers are found under their old codes so this link will not work!  Students can search Exam Papers online by module title.  If you wish to hide the broken link for this year, use the settings of the ‘Library Resources’ block to configure the block.

 

What you can do now:

  • If you have saved URL links of 2017-18 reading lists, either for your own reference or in student handbooks, please update them before term starts
  • Review the contents of your reading list: edit it to update notes, dates and readings, then publish to make it available to students.
  • Check your Moodle module has a ‘Library Resources’ block, and the link to the reading lists works
  • If you would like editing access to a reading list, get in touch so we can enable that for you.

 

For help with editing and updating Moodle, head to New Moodle and select the ‘Staff Help’ tab for guidance, or use the ‘Contact Moodle Support’ option there.

For help with editing an online reading list, please get in touch with ReadingLists@UCL.

For sourcing new books, journals, films and more, contact your friendly subject liaison librarian!

 

 

Reading Lists rollover complete!

By Hazel M Ingrey, on 20 July 2018

The rollover is complete! All your 2017-18 lists have been archived and a copy created for 2018-19, which you can edit straight away. Thank you for your patience with the unexpected delay.

Over the next few weeks TLS will update the module codes on the new reading lists, in line with the Academic Model Project. Once this is done please double check that the link from Moodle is working as you wish: switch on the Library Resources block to make a direct link to the whole reading list. We will also create new guidance on how to link from Moodle to your reading list, including screenshots from the new Moodle.

 

So now to prepare your reading lists for the new academic year: you just need to review, edit and publish!

 

 

 

 

 

Reading Lists Rollover: update

By Hazel M Ingrey, on 19 July 2018

The rollover was requested to start on Tuesday 17th July, however you will have noticed the 2017-18 lists remain on display.

The Talis team identified an issue relating to student numbers so paused the rollover: they updated us on Wednesday 18th with the news that they are testing the fix they have created and will re-start the rollover when they are confident there are no issues.  So sorry for this delay!  You can contine to edit your 2017-18 lists as usual, but please publish your changes as you work, to make sure they are saved.

New 2018-19 reading lists do not roll over and can be used as usual.

 

Reading Lists Rollover

By Hazel M Ingrey, on 26 June 2018

Some rights reserved CC BY 2.0 https://www.flickr.com/photos/110342926@N07/12779910463/ ; https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

‘Perfect Gwith Barrels’ by Philip Male

 

In TLS we are preparing for the annual ‘rollover’ of ReadingLists@UCL. This is our final task of the academic year: the CLA report of UCL’s digitised readings was sent in June, the majority of teaching has finished, and the exam period too is largely over.

 

Each summer the reading lists have a new copy made for the September term, much like the Moodle snapshot.  This year the rollover is scheduled for the evening of Tuesday 17th July 2018.  From about 5pm that day:

  • Reading lists for 2017-18 will have an exact copy made for 2018-19, which will publish immediately
  • The old version (2017-18) will archive, which means it will disappear from public view but can be found and re-used in future years if needed
  • Students will have continuous access to their reading lists: there is no down time for viewing lists
  • Editing rights remain constant, so list editors are able to edit the new lists as soon as they appear
  • Lists already set up as 2018-19 will be unaffected by the rollover

 

Please note:

  • Unpublished changes will not copy forward into the new list: please publish your lists before 17th July if you wish your updates to be carried forward.
  • We suggest you stop editing reading lists before 5pm on 17th July, and continue editing when you can see it has the 2018-19 date stamp – certainly from the morning of 18th July, if not sooner.
  • TLS are aware of the new module codes being introduced and will begin updating the reading list module codes from around 19th July.  More details in our blog post on this.
  • To have old courses archived, new lists set up, or current module names amended, please email us your requests!

 

Do you need a refresher on how to edit and manage your lists?  Drop in to our office in Senate House on Wednesday afternoons, 2.30 – 4.30pm for a quick session.  You could walk away with a new list set up and ready to go, get guidance on how to link to non-standard resources, or find out how to embed reading lists in Moodle.

The ReadingLists@UCL webpages also have guides, FAQs and contact details.

 

New Module Codes for 2018-19

By Hazel M Ingrey, on 13 June 2018

You may have heard of the Academic Model Project, a project to update all UCL module codes. Whilst you may be dealing with the extra work around this for your teaching, please spare a thought for how it will affect your online reading lists!

  • The current 2017-18 module codes remain on the existing online reading lists for any remaining exams, re-sits and continuing students.
  • Around the week of 2nd July the new instance of Moodle will be made available, with new module codes.
  • Around 17th July, ReadingLists@UCL will have its annual ‘rollover’ where lists are archived and a duplicate copy made for 2018-19.  The archived list will have the ‘old’ module code on it when archived.
  • From around 19th July onwards we will upload new module codes to the reading lists hierarchy and link the new lists to their new module code.  Once this is done, new Moodle courses will link to the correct reading list via the ‘Library Resources’ block.
  • Reading lists can be edited at any time and still found by their module title from the home page search: there is no break in being able to update them.

 

Despite best efforts there is likely to be some messy cross-over between old and new module codes, but we hope this catches the best time to make the switch and still be ready for August when departments might be updating Moodle.

Let us know if there is anything not covered here that might affect you!  Liaison and site librarians have also been informed and are your contact for other library issues, so do get in also touch with them.

 

Global Accessibility Awareness Day

By Hazel M Ingrey, on 17 May 2018

 

Today is Global Accessibility Awareness Day!  Here are a few thoughts on how the TLS have considered accessibility in our everyday library services.

 

Some rights reserved CC BY NC SA https://www.flickr.com/photos/cobalt/4109501032 ; https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/

Text Blurry? Lighted Magnifier By Cobalt123

All course readings digitised by the TLS are run through OCR (Optical Character Recognition) software to ensure they are accessible to those using screen readers.

Copyright regulations have changed over the years and our Copyright blog has been following these improvements.

Through ReadingLists@UCL we regularly link to e-books and electronic articles; these are subscribed resources provided by the library.  Many have good searchability and portability, or features such as read-aloud; however DRM added by the publisher can render them less accessible.  There has been some wonderful library-led research looking into just how accessible these platforms are.  This project undertook an e-book audit in 2016 and its work is being continued by Aspire 2018.

Some initiatives encourage publishers to engage in making their platforms easier to access, such as ‘Praise a publisher – critique a publisher’ in which the library community gave comment and feedback on the publishers who were the most speedy and helpful in providing accessible copies of texts – and any who didn’t quite come up to the mark.

While we occasionally still email publishers to request an accessible copy of text on behalf of a student, more often their requirements are more immediately met with the RNIB Bookshare service.  This has grown rapidly in recent years and now some publishers deposit accessible vesions automatically on pubication.  Any UCL students who need access the RNIB Bookshare please register with UCL Disability Support  who will enable your access.  They will also be able to introduce you other relevant support, such as the SENIT suite of specialist IT equipemnt and software.

The UCL Library Disability support is also really welcoming: do ask them for key ways they can assist you or someone you know.

 

UCL E-learning Baseline

By Hazel M Ingrey, on 7 February 2018

Some rights reserved CC BY NC https://www.flickr.com/photos/65172294@N00/8736954584 ; https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/

‘Tribute to Roger Ebert’ by get directly down

Our colleagues in Digital Eduction have recently been working on updating the UCL E-Learning Baseline.

The e-learning Baseline is now included in the Academic Manual, and offers a best practice template for taught courses at UCL, setting out the minimum expectations of a module.  One of the drivers is to support students who need consistent and clear information on their module, readings and assessments.

The baseline includes a requirement to have a reading list for students and recommends ReadingLists@UCL; it also clarifies that UCL policy is to have reading materials available for students 48 hours before teaching (both in section 5: Resources).

 

Providing consistency across programmes, and clarity of what reading is required, is one of the most positive feedback messages we have had from students about ReadingLists@UCL.  For some modules their reading requirements are spread over a handbook, with sometimes different or additional information in Moodle, and by email: having one consistent place to check makes their life much easier.  This also helps the library ensure books and journals are provided in time, and can translate into good feedback for your module.

Though reading lists themselves don’t have a baseline, we do run ‘Best practice’ sessions for academics.

In a Best Practice Reading Lists session last year we spoke to teaching staff in the Engineering department about recent research around how students use reading lists, and what potential barriers they find in understanding what is required of them, or accessing their essential readings in time.  All barriers are very simple to overcome, for example by using the controlled language provided by the ‘Essential’ ‘Optional’ tags on each reading; and dividing the list into sections by topic or by week needed.  Enriching your list with personal annotations really helps students understand whether you are pointing to a few readings that could be useful, or a seminal text they can’t get by without.  Some academics even like to point to readings they don’t believe have very good arguments, or are based in another library to oblige the student visit another institution: this is also helpful to make clear!

This is the Best Practice reading list of a very few resources used during our session.

Would you like a similar session for your department, or a quick 1:1 to look at your module?  Or would you find a baseline for reading lists a helpful guide?  You can reach us by email, or call or visit the TLS.

 

Drop-in sessions

By Hazel M Ingrey, on 19 January 2018

Wednesday afternoon drop-ins at the TLS office continue as usual.  Each Wednesday, Pam or Hazel will be available from 2.30 – 4.30 pm to:

  • Walk you through getting started
  • Set up a new reading list and add readings
  • Troubleshoot any issues, such as linking to Moodle
  • Give a quick refresher if you haven’t used the lists in a while
  • Provide a quiet seat to get away from your email and telephone to organise your readings!

 

The TLS office is in UCL Senate House, room 318.  If you aren’t familiar with this UCL Library Hub, come to the South block, third floor and ask at the UCL reception desk; or call the TLS office on 020 3549 5729 (internal x65729).

If Wednesday doesn’t suit, or you would like reading lists set up on your office computer or laptop, then we are very happy to visit you in your department: get in touch to arrange a visit!

 

 

Course readings issue!

By Hazel M Ingrey, on 15 December 2017

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Traffic Cones!!! by Natesh Ramasamy

Today an academic alerted us to a problem with a small number of the course readings we make available through our Course Readings service. These readings are digitised by the library under the CLA licence, and made available as a link on the online reading lists.

In January we migrated all course readings to be hosted by the CLA Content Store, enabling us to benefit from the large number of digitised readings already available from other Universities – which reduces the amount of scanning needed from departments.

However a small number of readings remained on the UCL server where we originally stored them.  These weren’t updated for various reasons, such as: links to digitised readings were copied from one list to another without notifying the TLS to re-check them; students were being directed to archived lists; the lists and readings were used in years previous to 2015-16 but had not been updated.

What are we doing to solve the issue?  We ran a report of all readings across all 2017-18 reading lists and identified those with the older style link.  The TLS team ‘copyright checkers’ are checking the readings still fall under the CLA licence and completing our compliance adminstration.  The TLS ‘digitising and lists’ team are updating each link in the online reading list.  We are prioritising first those lists we have been told are in use, and then those modules which are running in 2017-18 according to Portico.  For those lists not running this year, we will be in touch with the department to ask if the readings will be needed at a future date.

Please note: if you have copied any links to add to Moodle or other places, we won’t be able to update these as we only have access to the online reading lists. Let us know if you find any broken links and we will create a working URL for your online reading list.

If you have used the ‘Request review’ option on your reading list in the past year, we will have auotmatically double-checked the links on your reading list.

If you have any questions, please email, or call the TLS team on 020 3549 5729 (internal x65729).

UCL and Talis co-hosted event

By Hazel M Ingrey, on 1 December 2017

Talis Aspire and UCL eventThe ReadingLists@UCL software is provided by a company called Talis.  We have worked closely with them over the years to develop our service; feedback from UCL academics and students have led to improvements to the reading lists for everyone.

This week we co-hosted an event with Talis, attended by librarians and learning technologist from other Universities.  Some of the presentations and discussion really gave me pause for thought.

 

June Hedges reminded us that the UCL student body has more than doubled in the past ten years.  Budgets, space and resources certainly haven’t kept up with this amazing growth, so reading lists really is one of the essential value-for-money services we can offer:

  • using the lists to deliver readings digitised under the CLA licence, so paper print readings can reach all students on a taught module
  • to make the most of existing electronic resources by bookmarking articles, e-books and film direct to the reading list
  • … and in doing this, students clicks on key readings maintain the resources’ high usage statistics, which helps to ensure they continue to be funded for purchase.  (Adding a copied pdf into Moodle, by comparison, will mean no measureable indication that the journal is being used).

Eugene Walker from the School of Managment gave a wonderful insight into how his department has identified the benefits to using ReadingLists@UCL, wanted their students to have the improved academic experience, and doggedly set about improving their uptake!  They have some subject specific resources which they use to create excellent, helpful lists for students.  They also have some self-imposed ambitious targets for next year.

Goldsmiths had a similar approach to UCL, explained by Maria O’Hara: they aimed to thoroughly use their online reading lists from the start.  In their statistics they count reading lists which are set up, populated, and have the key texts purchased or digitised.  That is a great deal of work, but sets a wonderfully high standard for their users.

Something else I took away and will be working on this year, is looking ahead. One measure of our success last year was reaching the target of 65% coverage of reading lists for taught course modules.  This year we are focussing on:

  • Quality and currency.  Excellently resourced lists that are updated regularly, are enriched by commentary or notes, and excellently resourced.
  • Best practice.  What makes a good list?  Do you know if students are engaging with all or some of the list, or what they need from a list?  We will use research, student feedback and analytics to suggest best practice.
  • Use in teaching and research. Academic staff have told us how they use reading lists in the classroom for teaching, it would be good to capture this for peer-to-peer use.  We will also suggest ways to use lists as a tool to engage students in learning through research.

 

Everyone seemed engaged in the conversation and the TLS team certainly came away re-inspired with some academic-new-year resolutions for online reading lists.