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Call for contributions: Managing research data in the humanities

TinaJohnson4 June 2019

The (ALLEA) E-Humanities Working Group is seeking feedback on its draft guidance for humanities researchers working with data:

Recommendations for Sustainable and FAIR Data Sharing in the Humanities

Deadline: 15 July 2019

There is a growing consensus that research data needs to be FAIR – Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Reusable.  That is, it must be managed, organised, preserved, and open to scrutiny and reuse. For this to happen requires a collective rethink of the role of data in the research lifecycle and a change in organisational culture and practices, both across the UK and internationally.

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UCL Open Science Day – 23 May 2019

TinaJohnson10 May 2019

Free workshop for all UCL researchers and staff. Registration is now open.

UCL Open Science Day: developing open scholarship at UCL

8 Pillars of Open Science

A year on from LERU‘s publication of Open Science and its role in universities: a roadmap for cultural change, and following the success of the last year’s workshop, UCL Open Science Day 2019 will explore what open science – or open scholarship – will mean for a UCL researcher in its different applications, and how best the UCL research community can make the practical changes needed.

Thursday 23 May 2019 9.30-4pm

Institute of Education (IOE), 20 Bedford Way, London, WC1H 0AL View Map

This event is organised by UCL LIbrary Services, with Scientific Knowledge Services, UCL (University College London) and in collaboration with UCL Press and LIBER (Association of European Research Libraries).

Email contact: lib-researchsupport@ucl.ac.uk.

Blog updated 22 May 2019

Research Data Repository launch 5 June 2019

TinaJohnson8 May 2019

UCL Research Data Repository

UCL institutional Research Data Repository was launched June 2019

After 2 years of collaboration with provider Figshare, the Research Data Repository is live!  This free, open service will allow all UCL researchers (doctoral and beyond) to publish, preserve and share data underpinning research – or other potentially useful data.  Free, open access to data is central to FAIR data principles and enables replicable research – key aspects of Open Science.

On 5 June 2019, UCL researchers, PhD students and staff joined  Library Services and Research IT Services teams to celebrate the launch.

Find out more information about the UCL Research Data Repository  and Research Data Repository FAQs on the UCL Research Data Management Repository webpages

5 reasons to use the UCL Research Data Repository

  • repository storage complies with research funder requirements to preserve research data for 10 years or more
  • publishing data as a research output takes little further effort and makes your research more discoverable and citable
  • greater impact and visibility will enhance your academic profile
  • published data can be validated and tested by others – a sign of robust methodology
  • sharing data is likely to become a key performance indicator as research practices become more open

Additional benefits of sharing your data publicly

  • making your data available can lead to new collaborations and partnerships
  • allowing data to be reused and avoiding doubling up makes the best use of funding
  • published data provides great resources for education and training

The Research Data Management team plans to deliver tailored training on using the UCL Data Repository later this year at different UCL departments.

Join UCL Reproducibility

Subscribe to the UCL reproducibility mailing list for news and updates, invitations to contribute and training opportunities. 

Attend a Reproducibilitea talk

See more information and 2019 ReproducibiliTea UCL topics and dates.

Colleagues from all disciplines, sceptics and non-UCL, welcome.

Research Data Management blogs

Further reading

This blog was updated 13 June 2019.

 

Making UCL research reproducible

TinaJohnson15 April 2019

The call for Open Access to research

Progress on sharing research has been gradual since the Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities (2006) and the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment – or DORA (2012).  Last year’s publication of Open Science and its role in universities: a roadmap for cultural change by LERU, lead-authored by Dr Paul Ayris, has helped shift the debate from theory to practice.  In September 2018, cOAlition S – a consortium of 12 European research funders – called for public-funded research to be published in compliant Open Access (OA) journals or platforms by 1 January 2020. The resulting guidance document, Plan S: Making full & immediate Open Access a reality, has been largely welcomed by the research community for its 10 principles:

Plan S principles:

  1. the author retains unrestricted copyright – a Creative Commons licence where possible
  2. robust criteria and requirements are in place for OA journal and platform services
  3. funders collaboratively establish and support OA journals and infrastructures
  4. funders or universities cover OA publication fees, not individuals as a rule
  5. standardised funding and capping of OA fees apply across Europe
  6. universities, research organisations and libraries align their policies and strategies
  7. monograph and book publishing practices will require more time to change
  8. open archives and repositories are important
  9. hybrid Open Access models are NOT compatible with these principles
  10. funders will monitor compliance and sanction non-compliance

The UCL response to Plan S

Published January 2019, the UCL response to Plan S fully endorses Open Access in scholarly publishing, calling for “a wholesale rethink of the strategy and timelines for moving to 100% Open Access”, with:

  • more engagement with universities, learned societies and researchers before implementation
  • more detail on how Open Access publishing could work in different subject disciplines
  • a more realistic timeline of years not months to allow universities to apply DORA recommendations and set up appointment and promotions frameworks
  • more detail and thought on how publishing fees and Article Processing Charges (APCs) could work, with a risk assessment
  • worldwide engagement, as Europe is too small a player to make global changes

 

The Road to Reproducibility diagram showing Challenges, Answers, Support Mechanisms and Incentives

The Road to Reproducibility: UCL draft Research Reproducibility policy April 2019

Draft UCL statement on reproducibility

On 10 April, UCL colleagues met for a UCL Research Reproducibility Town Hall discussion on the approach and actions needed to improve research standards through replicability.  Under specific discussion was a draft UCL statement on reproducibility in researchEmail contact: ovpr@ucl.ac.uk

 

UCL Open Science Day 23 May

Join us on Thursday 23 May 2019 9.30 – 4pm

Logan Hall, Institute of Education (IOE), 20 Bedford Way, London, WC1H 0AL View Map

This free UCL Library workshop will “explore the facets of Open Science and how these are, or could be, pursued by UCL researchers”, with morning discussions and afternoon workshops offering practical advice.

Morning talks include Registered Reports and the UKRNProf Chris Chambers (Cardiff University), cognitive neuroscientist, expert in registered reports and co-founder of the UK Reproducibility Network (UKRN).

 

Join UCL Reproducibility

Subscribe to the UCL reproducibility mailing list for news and updates, invitations to contribute and training opportunities. 

The next talk is on Thursday 23 May and part of the UCL Open Science Day 2019

Attend a Reproducibilitea talk

See more information and 2019 ReproducibiliTea UCL topics and dates.

Colleagues from all disciplines, sceptics and non-UCL, welcome.

ReproducibiliTea UCL talks so far:

  1. Nosek et al: ‘Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science‘ (Science, 2015)
  2. Marcus Munafò et al: ‘A Manifesto for Reproducible Science‘ (2017)
  3. Halsey et al: The Fickle p Generates Irreproducible Results (2015)

The ReproducibiliTea journal club is supported by the UCL Researcher-led Initiative Award, and the UK Reproducibility Network has helped to spread the club to a number of universities.

 

UCL Open Access policy development:

Key documents in the Open Scholarship movement

Media articles

Resources

This blog was updated 12 June

UCL Bibliometrics Town Hall

DanielVan Strien26 November 2018

Developing a policy for metrics at UCL

UCL has been developing a set of principles on the responsible use of bibliometrics and other ways to measure research. This builds on UCL’s signing of the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment in 2015; responsible evaluation practices in the 2017 UCL Academic Careers Framework; and UCL’s commitment to Open Science.

This Town Hall meeting and panel discussion aims to get feedback on the proposed principles, which we are planning to develop into a formal policy in the coming year, and to discuss the issues surrounding the use of quantitative research metrics.

The meeting will be followed by a public survey on the use of metrics and the proposed principles, to gather additional feedback from those unable to attend.

Registration for the event (via Eventbrite)

Schedule

Introduction – Professor David Price, Vice-Provost (Research)

Responsible metrics in practice – Dr. Elizabeth Gadd, Loughborough University

Overview of the new principles – Dr. Paul Ayris, Pro-Vice-Provost (UCL Libraries)

Panel discussion and public questions

Event at QMUL – SES Open: Harnessing FAIR Data Symposium, 3 September 2018

DanielVan Strien25 July 2018

SES Open:  Harnessing FAIR Data Symposium

Harnessing FAIR Data (3 September 2018, 13:00 – 17:00) focuses on researchers who employ or are seeking to use data in their work. FAIR is a set of guiding principles to make data Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable. In this thematic context we aim to better understand the cross-disciplinary practice of sourcing, using and managing data and its associated implications, such as ownership, standards and metadata, and access and licensing. Experienced speakers from around the UK will come together to explore FAIR data and services, and a panel session will help to identify key questions that researchers face when considering using data in research.

Register online

Programme highlights:

Realising the Potential: Final Report of the Open Data Task Force. 
Prof. Pam Thomas, University of Warwick
The Re-use of Consumer Data for the Social Good
Prof. Paul Longley, Department of Geography, UCL
Using socio-ecological simulation models to make the most of hard-won paleoecological data 
Andrew Lane, Department of Geography, King’s College London
The CLOSER consortium of longitudinal studies: Opportunities and obstacles in harmonising data from diverse sources
Dr. Dara O’Neill, CLOSER, UCL Institute of Education
Publishing FAIR Data in Chemistry
Dr. Charles Romain, Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London

Panel members: Prof. Pam Thomas, Dr. Paul Ayris (UCL), Prof. Henry Rzepa (Imperial College London)

This event is hosted by QMUL, UCL eResearch Domain and the SES Consortium.

UCL Open Science Day: developing open scholarship at UCL

DanielVan Strien19 April 2018

Free event for UCL researchers and staff.

This one day workshop will explore the facets of Open Science and how these are/could be pursued by UCL researcher. In the morning speakers will discuss different aspects of and perspectives on Open Science with afternoon workshops offering practical advice. There will also be opportunity to discuss the steps UCL should take to support Open Science. This free event will be open to all UCL staff and is delivered by UCL Library Services with support from UCL Organisational Development.

Speakers include:

  • Prof. David Price, Vice-Provost (Research), UCL
  • Dr Paul Ayris, Pro-Vice-Provost, UCL Library Services
  • Catriona MacCallum, Director of Open Science, Hindawi
  • Emily Sena, University of Edinburgh
  • James Wilsdon, University of Sheffield
  • Simon Hettrick, Sustainable Software Institute

Afternoon workshops will cover:

  • How do we make Open the default at UCL
  • How to make your data open (and FAIR)?
  • Citizen Science
  • Open Peer review
  • Open Education

Registration available via Eventbrite. Please contact lib-researchsupport@ucl.ac.uk with any questions.

Open Research events in London

DanielVan Strien8 November 2017

Two upcoming events organised by Open Research London exploring open science/research are open for booking:

The first event is taking place on the 21st of November and is a satellite event of the OpenCon 2017 conference. During the day there will be a ‘hackathon’ focusing on the themes of ‘Open for reproducibility’ and ‘Open for collaborative-coding’. You can find more information and book here. In the evening of the 21st, there will be a number of talks on open access and open science. Further information and booking here.

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