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  • Specimen of the week 221: The mega-toothed shark tooth

    By Will J Richard, on 4 January 2016

    LDUCZ-V1301 fossil megalodon tooth

    LDUCZ-V1301 fossil megalodon tooth

    Hello and a Happy New Year to you Grant-fans. So, the first specimen of the week of 2016 falls to me, Will Richard. And I’ve chosen a monster to kick off the year: possibly the biggest ever fish with teeth to match. This one was found on the 2nd January 1880 (seasonal!) but people have been puzzling over these dental discards for generations. They were originally believed to be the dried tongues of dragons but actually I think the truth might be scarier…

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    Underwhelming Fossil Fish of the Month: November 2015

    By Mark Carnall, on 30 November 2015

    The sound of mince pies is in the air. People with awful moustaches are getting a free pass this month. This can mean one of only two things. Either the annual conference of British Pie Awards and The Handlebar Club have booked the same conference venue* or it’s November. Delete as appropriate. What this may mean is that it isn’t October anymore, so it’s time to welcome you to another underwhelming fossil fish of the month, our monthly foray into the world of uninspiring fossil fish. UK museums have thousands if not hundreds of thousands of fossil fish in their collections and they get a hard time. They aren’t used in exhibitions, they don’t feature on lunchboxes, they aren’t the subject of Hollywood films.

    Well, normally that is. This month, due to a mix up at the email sorting office, I’ve been wired a rather interesting and semi-famous fossil fish. You’ll probably instantly recognise it from the photo below. It’s going to be hard to play this one down, this one has been featured on stamps. I know, I’m going to get letters for highering standards. (more…)

    Petrie Menagerie: The Crocodile

    By Edmund Connolly, on 13 September 2013

    We have covered birds, insects, reptiles and mammals and we now end on an animal prevalent in both land and water, perhaps one of the most iconic Egyptian animals about. The Nilotic crocodile is the second largest in the world and can measure in at a hefty 6.1 metres, a worthy beast for our Petrie Menagerie.

     

    Petrie Menagerie #7: The Crocodile

    As a native inhabitant of Egypt it is not surprising these creatures are found in numerous literal and more mythology inspired presentations:

    A wooden crocodile, with a toothy grin

    A wooden crocodile, with a toothy grin

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