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Opening data & code: Who is your audience? Thursday 28th October 4-5pm 

By Alison Fox, on 20 October 2021

Join the UCL Office for Open Science and Scholarship and the UCL eResearch Domain to explore opening data and code.

Date: Thursday 28th October
Time: 4-5pm
Register: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/opening-data-code-who-is-your-audience-tickets-172935283087?utm-campaign=social&utm-content=attendeeshare&utm-medium=discovery&utm-term=listing&utm-source=cp&aff=escb

To achieve the potential impact of a particular research project in academia or in the wider world, research outputs need to be managed, shared and used effectively.

Open Research enables replicable tools to be accessible to a wide audience of users. The session will showcase three projects and discuss the potentials of reuse of data and software and how to adapt to different types of user.

Join our speakers and panel discussion to:

  • understand the potential of sharing your data and software
  • learn about how projects share their software and data with different audiences and how they tailored their open data & code to different audiences appreciate the needs of different types of user (e.g. industry based, policy maker, citizen scientists)

Confirmed speakers:

This event is part of UCL Open Access Week 2021

Please register online.

New UKRI Open Access Policy Briefing, 26th October 2-3pm

By Alison Fox, on 18 October 2021

Join the UCL Office for Open Science and Scholarship, UCL Press and UCL library Services in a policy briefing about the new UKRI open access policy.

Date: 26th October 2021
Time: 2-3pm
Register: https://ucl.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_TG1jEr6DSfOKIQQFE3emFw

The new UKRI open access policy announced in August 2020 affects academics publishing work that acknowledges UK Research Council funding. The policy requires open access on publication under the CC BY licence (or, exceptionally, CC BY-ND) for articles and conference papers submitted on or after 1 April 2022. It also requires open access no later than 12 months after publication for monographs, book chapters and edited collections resulting from a grant from one of the UK Research Councils, published on or after 1 January 2024. The UKRI policy will inform the open access policy for the next REF.

In this first UCL briefing session on the UKRI policy, Catherine Sharp (Head of Open Access Services) will set out the key policy points and compliant routes to publishing in journal articles and conference papers. Lara Speicher (Head of Publishing, UCL Press) will explore the details of the new UKRI monograph requirements, and their implications for authors. Professor Margot Finn (UCL History and immediate past President of the Royal Historical Society) will also join the session to discuss these changes and the implications for authors of monographs in the humanities and social sciences in particular.

Given the importance of the UKRI policy in shaping UK open access requirements, all researchers who publish are encouraged to attend a briefing on the UKRI policy, and to bring questions from their own disciplines.

Please register online.

UCL Press Textbook webinar- Oct 27th, 2-3pm

By Alison Fox, on 14 October 2021

Join UCL Press during open access week to find out more about their new open access textbook programme and how UCL academics can get involved.

Date: Wednesday October 27th
Time: 2pm
Sign up: https://ucl.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_SvPKEH_JTv2ziahZTCMmEA

The debate over access and affordability of eTextbooks is high on the agenda for many institutional libraries and publishers and many are calling for an open access solution.
In response, UCL Press is currently developing a new programme of open access textbooks, for undergraduate and postgraduate courses and modules, across disciplines. The new textbook programme will be the first OA textbook list in the UK and builds on the success of the Press’s publishing output and the significant increase in requirements for digital resources, in a changing teaching and learning environment. The programme offers the Press an opportunity to showcase and promote teaching excellence across a broad range of fields and contribute to the open culture UCL is continuing to build.
In this webinar we will discuss in more depth, why and how UCL Press are creating their open access programme and the opportunities, practicalities, and benefits of committing to, publishing and disseminating home-grown textbooks.

We will also focus on other initiatives and projects from UCL and from around the world to provide a forum for lively discussion about open access textbooks and education resources more broadly.

We encourage you to join us to hearing more about this programme and other OA initiatives.

Sign up: https://ucl.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_SvPKEH_JTv2ziahZTCMmEA

Open Access week 2021 – Open in Practice

By Alison Fox, on 12 October 2021

Please see the below message re-posted on behalf of the UCL Office for Open Science and Scholarship.

For Open Access week this year we are going to be focusing on the practical side of Open, not just Open Access, but Open Data, Code, Software, Licensing, you name it, we are aiming to talk about it!

We have three events lined up for our UCL audience, you can get full details about those below. They are all very different to each other and we are hoping to see you there! We also have daily blog posts in the pipeline and the latest edition of the Office for Open Science & Scholarship Newsletter coming out during the week too. It’s going to be a busy one so make sure you follow us on twitter or subscribe to the blog for regular updates!

Tuesday 26th October 2-3pm – New UKRI Open Access Policy Briefing

The new UKRI open access policy announced in August 2020 affects academics publishing work that acknowledges UK Research Council funding. The policy requires open access on publication under the CC BY licence (or, exceptionally, CC BY-ND) for articles and conference papers submitted on or after 1 April 2022. It also requires open access no later than 12 months after publication for monographs, book chapters and edited collections resulting from a grant from one of the UK Research Councils, published on or after 1 January 2024. The UKRI policy will inform the open access policy for the next REF.

In this first UCL briefing session on the UKRI policy, Catherine Sharp (Head of Open Access Services) will set out the key policy points and compliant routes to publishing in journal articles and conference papers. Lara Speicher (Head of Publishing, UCL Press) will explore the details of the new UKRI monograph requirements, and their implications for authors. Professor Margot Finn (UCL History and immediate past President of the Royal Historical Society) will also join the session to discuss these changes and the implications for authors of monographs in the humanities and social sciences in particular.

Given the importance of the UKRI policy in shaping UK open access requirements, all researchers who publish are encouraged to attend a briefing on the UKRI policy, and to bring questions from their own disciplines.

Please register online.

Wednesday 27th October 2-3pm – UCL Press as eTextbook Publisher

The debate over access and affordability of eTextbooks is high on the agenda for many institutional libraries and publishers and many are calling for an open access solution.

In response, UCL Press is currently developing a new programme of open access textbooks, for undergraduate and postgraduate courses and modules, across disciplines. The new textbook programme will be the first OA textbook list in the UK and builds on the success of the Press’s publishing output and the significant increase in requirements for digital resources, in a changing teaching and learning environment. The programme offers the Press an opportunity to showcase and promote teaching excellence across a broad range of fields and contribute to the open culture UCL is continuing to build.

In this webinar we will discuss in more depth, why and how UCL Press are creating their open access programme and the opportunities, practicalities, and benefits of committing to, publishing and disseminating home-grown textbooks.

We will also focus on other initiatives and projects from UCL and from around the world to provide a forum for lively discussion about open access textbooks and education resources more broadly.

We encourage you to join us to hearing more about this programme and other OA initiatives, please register online.

Thursday 28th October 4-5pm – Opening data & code: Who is your audience?

To achieve the potential impact of a particular research project in academia or in the wider world, research outputs need to be managed, shared and used effectively.

Open Research enables replicable tools to be accessible to a wide audience of users. The session will showcase three projects and discuss the potentials of reuse of data and software and how to adapt to different types of user.

Join our speakers and panel discussion to:

  • understand the potential of sharing your data and software
  • learn about how projects share their software and data with different audiences and how they tailored their open data & code to different audiences appreciate the needs of different types of user (e.g. industry based, policy maker, citizen scientists)

Please register online.

Black History Month 2021

By Jennifer L Brown, on 11 October 2021

We are in Black History month 2021 and it has taken me 11 days to decide should I write a blog? What will I say?  Should Black history be recognised for one month? And the list goes on… But I could not let the month past without saying anything. So here it is ……….the blog.

I am sure that I have said this before but I will say it again…whilst I believe black heritage should always be celebrated rather than allocated to one month of the year, it is a great opportunity to focus upon great achievements and history which is still until this day at times often overlooked, disregarded and forgotten about.

When we speak of diversity and inclusion we (speaking generally here) need to really understand what it means. For example, this may mean being able to attend work in your cultural attire, wearing an afro, locs, head wrap, speaking in your native dialect at times etc without feeling that you will be judged/looked down upon, or face micro aggression.  

My dialect is Jamaican patios which some describe as a form of broken English and occasionally it slips out and I have an ‘oh dear’ moment which is synchronized with  slight embarrassment that comes over me. But as I sit here writing I ask myself why? I am not swearing or using offensive language. I am of Jamaican heritage that’s me and that’s my culture, can’t take that away from me. It is who I am.

Sometimes black people have to wear a mask in the workplace and not bring their authentic self. Why ? to be accepted, to fit in, to be promoted and so forth. This doesn’t demonstrate inclusion, masking your true self means that you are still not accepted and included unless you conform to what is considered the ‘norm’.

This blog is not just about me, no,  it is about the lived experience of ‘others’, the ‘others’ who have become so weary, the ‘others’ who want to be accepted, the ‘others’ that want to be seen, the others who want to be heard, the ‘others’ who don’t want to rock the boat, the ‘others’ that don’t want to have to do twice as much in the workplace to receive recognition, the ‘others’ who are burnt out because they do so much to compensate, the ‘others’ who are sick and tired of being sick and tired, the ‘others’ who are fearful and the ‘others’ that have a lot to say but do not have the platform or voice to do so.

So here I am writing this on behalf of the ‘others.’

You might be one of the ‘others’ reading this blog, you might be one who has seen the struggles or you might be one that has caused the struggles. Whichever category you fall into this blog is for you.

To the ‘others’ – I have seen you, I have listened and I heard you. Persevere.

Motivational quote

One of the hardest things to do is change someone’s mindset but I am a strong believer that educating one is key. It may take time but through persistence, innovation, consistency and allyship it can be achieved.

Music

Joseph Bologne Chevalier Saint Georges (b. 1745, d,1799) the composer was born in Guadeloupe and made his debut as a violinist and composer.

Here is a link to Violin Concertos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kmiuh_OL2Zg which I think is exquisite.

Katherine Johnson

Katherine Johnson an African American women who was not only a mathematical genius but was instrumental in NASA’s Mercury program (1961-1963).

In 1961, Katherine calculated the path for Freedom 7, the spacecraft that placed the first U.S. astronaut in space.

The 2016 movie called ‘Hidden figures’ is based upon the true story of the three female African–American (including Katherine) whom played a vital role in John Glenn (the astronaut) launching into orbit despite the discrimination they faced within the workplace.

Madam C.J. Walker – 1867-1919

Madam C.J. Walker born Sarah Breedlove was an African American entrepreneur who invented a line of best selling hair products. She became the first female self-made millionaire in the American Guinness book of record.

In 2020 Netflix released a series entitled ‘Self-made’ which was inspired by the life of Madam C.J. Walker, definitely one to watch.

Events:

I am looking forward to attending a range of events some can be found below.

Black History Season: Black London; History, Art and Culture

20th October 2021 https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/black-history-season-black-london-history-art-and-culture-tickets-175334087977?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

St Paul’s/Bank Black History Walk 31st October 2021

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/st-paulsbank-black-history-walk-tickets-176826953177?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Black London: History, Art and Culture: with Avril 28th October 2021 https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/black-london-history-art-and-culture-with-avril-tickets-168451734673?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Black London: History, Art & Culture with by Avril Nanton and Jody Burton 3rd November 2021 https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/black-london-history-art-culture-with-by-avril-nanton-and-jody-burton-tickets-169768322623?aff=ebdssbdestsearch&keep_tld=1

 

My mini book list:

Small Island (2004) by Andrea Levy

With hope in their eyes (1998) by Vivienne Francis

Happy Sexy Millionaire (2021) Steve Bartlett

The Value in the Valley (1995) by Iyanla Vanzant

Mary Seacole (2005) by Jane Robinson

Becoming (2018) by Michelle Obama

 

I hope Black History Month 2021 will be insightful and impactful for all.

Bye (‘Lickkle More’ in Jamaican Patios) 😊

 

Jennifer Brown Chartered MCIPD BPsS

Chair of Library Services Equality, Diversity and Inclusion Committee

 

UCL Press exceeds five million book downloads

By Alison Fox, on 11 October 2021

We are delighted to announce that UCL Press books have now been downloaded more than 5 million times. You can see the full details here.

Since launching in 2015, we’ve published more than 200 academic books – including monographs, edited collections and textbooks. Downloads have taken place in 245 countries and territories across the world, reaching readers in countries as far afield as Afghanistan and North Korea!

To celebrate, we’ve produced a video- enjoy!

Teams Calling and headsets

By Margaret Stone, on 6 October 2021

Following the recent announcement about Teams Calling, all colleagues who are being set up for external calls should now have received an email from the ISD project with information about the migration over the coming weekend (8-10 October).  After this date, external calls to and from your UCL extension number will be routed through Teams and not through the handset on your desk.  Please note, as outlined in the earlier blogpost above, we will be in touch in due course about the next phases – removal of handsets which are no longer needed, and setup of group call queues for help points and teams where applicable.

Provision of headsets

If you need a headset for telephone calls and other Teams calls/meetings in shared office spaces, please do use the link provided in the Teams Calling email to request a headset from the project.  There is currently a delay in supply of these, but we have been assured that supplies are moving and the delay shouldn’t be too long.  Please only request one headset per person, but obviously you can transport your headset between the office and your home working location, if applicable, for use in both places.  In the meantime, any set of headphones with a microphone, such as those used with mobile phones, will of course work for Teams calls/meetings.

If you are not eligible for a headset from the Teams Calling project, you can request a headset for use in shared office spaces from the Library IT Support team.

 

Promoting THE Award shortlist

By simon.bralee.15, on 6 October 2021

The Student Centre team have been shortlisted in the Times Higher Education Awards under the “Outstanding Library Team” category. This is an amazing achievement and we want to celebrate it.

Image for email signature

Please can you attach this image to your email signatures. More information on how to do this is available on the ISD webpages.

Email signature

(To save right click)

The image is also available for download from the THE Awards website.

Sharing the news on social Media

The Library comms team will co-ordinate sharing the news through the library’s social media accounts. If you wish to tweet about the shortlisting in a personal capacity on your own accounts, please do use the hashtag #THEAwards.

About the awards

The winners will be announced at a celebration event in central London on 25 November 2021. These are the 17th annual THE Awards, perhaps better known as the “Oscars of higher education”.

This year they focus primarily on activity during the 2019-20 academic year, and so include a large number of submissions based on the initial response of all HE institutions to the unique and wide-ranging challenges brought by the Covid-19 pandemic.

Flexitime and leave arrangements – MyFlexi now inactive

By Bethan Smith, on 4 October 2021

As of October 1st, the MyFlexi system has now been retired. Colleagues will be unable to access the system, with the exception of the Library HR team, and the LibNet pages on leave and absence have been updated with links to MyHR. Clocking in and out on-site was already suspended but has now been formally ended. 

MyHR and Local TOIL Arrangements

Colleagues should now book annual leave via MyHR. A quick guide to applying for annual leave on MyHR is available on LibNet as is a new document explaining how to cancel leave requests. More detailed guides on navigating MyHR are available on the UCL Knowledge Centre (please note you will need to be on the UCL network or VPN in order to access these). 

TOIL should now be managed locally within teams. Colleagues should consider the flexitime guidelines and FAQs available on LibNet when discussing TOIL arrangements.  

Included in the LibNet guidance are Word and Excel templates you may wish to use to log TOIL – please note that these documents are not prescriptive, and you may wish to adapt them, or use your own local documents, for your team’s needs.  

In addition, managers should by now have received a list of any outstanding MyFlexi positive balances accrued within their teams before the MyFlexi system was retired.  

Annual Leave Carry Over 

Any colleagues who did not submit their carry-over requests by 15th September should await confirmation from Library HR before updating their carry-over on MyHR. The system is currently being updated by HR Systems. Instructions on how to add carry-over will be circulated once colleagues can begin the process.

Please note that any colleagues who did submit carry over requests to Library HR by the 15th September will not need to manually add their carry over. It may be the case that your carry over is not currently displaying on MyHR as of the 1st October, but it should be added shortly as the system updates.  

Manager Briefings 

We are continuing to host informal briefing sessions for line managers to answer questions about local implementation of policy. Please contact Bethan Smith to book a place on one of these slots.

The remaining dates and times of the sessions are as follows: 

Thursday 14th October, 14:00 -15:00, led by Martin Moyle and June Hedges 

Friday 22nd October, 11:00 -12:00, led by Martin Moyle and June Hedges

Questions on using MyHR to submit and manage leave requests that are not covered by the UCL Knowledge Centre or LibNet can be addressed to the Library HR Team. Any other questions about the above can be sent to Bethan Smith. 

Teams Calling to replace desk phones

By Margaret Stone, on 29 September 2021

Library Services as a whole is due to begin the migration from desk phones to Teams Calling during October.  This is part of a UCL-wide project led by ISD, and some site libraries have already been migrated as part of their host department.

The initial change will only affect staff who need to make external calls for work.  They will see an update to their Microsoft Teams software with the addition of a keypad to dial any UK telephone number (or international number if this has been authorised by the line manager).  Managers have provided information on which staff fall into this category, and these staff will shortly be contacted by the ISD project to alert them to the change.  In addition, these staff will be asked if they need a computer headset for work – please take up this offer if you need one.  All other staff who need a headset should contact Library IT Support.

All staff who do not need to make external calls for work should continue to contact UCL colleagues using voice calls on Teams – no dialling required.

Some staff may receive a new telephone number as part of this project, especially where numbers have previously been shared.  You will be advised of your new number if this happens.  For all staff who get a Teams Calling number (old or new), your telephone number will be displayed on the UCL Directory by default, regardless of any previous settings. You can change your directory preferences via the Directory Preferences Self-Service page. The Directory updates each night so your changes will be reflected the next day.

There will be further phases of the project, firstly to introduce group calling (queues) for help points and other teams where relevant, and secondly to remove telephone handsets which will no longer be required.  Managers are working to ensure an adequate number of handsets are retained for emergency purposes at each site, but in general handsets on individual staff desks will be removed.  Finally, after the initial migration, we can always ask for additional/new staff to be enabled for external calls if needed, as this is an ongoing ISD service.

For full information on the project, visit the UCL Teams Calling website.  If you have any questions about the migration, please direct them in the first instance to Library IT Support.