X Close

IOE Student Blog

Home

A blog on life at IOE and education affairs written for students by students.

Menu

Experience, Exchange and Learn – a student’s reflection on a student-staff exchange with the University of Porto

By IOE Digital, on 22 December 2022

By Arthur Sun, Education Studies BA

In September 2022, I took part in the first student-staff exchange between IOE and the Education Science programme at the University of Porto (UPorto) in Portugal. The visit was supported by IOE’s International Office and my department Education, Practice and Society, with the aim of fostering international relationships and piloting a possible short exchange scheme. I was extremely lucky to be selected with four other peers as student representatives from the BA Education Studies. We spent three days in Portugal that included a seminar with Porto staff, leading a day of activities with Porto students and taking a walking tour of the university’s historic campus.

We students were given the autonomy to develop a seminar to be shared with the students in Portugal on the second day of our trip.

As students, we didn’t need to teach, but wanted to share things with the Portuguese students. We knew the engagement of the students would be essential, so we created many engaging games: one guessing song titles and a truth or lie activity taking inspiration from the different colonial histories. We also shared some concrete knowledge with the students such as introducing the colonial histories of the UK and Portugal to demonstrate the different impacts of modern university education.

I personally learnt a lot and have been very inspired by this trip. The following are two key ideas that I want to share:

Read the rest of this entry »

‘African Apocalypse’: Unveiling the trail of colonial violence and its enduring legacy

By IOE Digital, on 22 December 2022

African Apocalypse

Film screening and debate at University College London, 15th December 2022

By Sabina Barone, Social Science MPhil/PhD

‘This film is about ghosts. Ghosts of the past that even while they slumbered have continued to influence the present’ wrote Rob Lemkin, the director of the docu-drama ‘African Apocalypse’ screened at UCL on December 15th 2022. The ghosts are those of the victims of the 1899 French mission in what is now Niger, the uncountable men, women, and children brutally assassinated, whose obliteration broke the continuity with the ancestors and whose pain still troubles their descendants. But those ghosts are also the spectres of the perpetrators’ evil conscience, the ruthless inhumanity at the core of the so-called civilising mission of colonialism.

Read the rest of this entry »

Learning about “Community Music”

By IOE Digital, on 20 December 2022

A woman plays flut in the casual setting with a conductor in the centre.

Image by Jason Ilagan for IOE

By Amy Ellis, Music Education MA

The Music Education MA offers a varied view of music education, splitting two of its modules ‘The Disciplines of Music Education’, into three strands, one of which is Sociology. Over the course of term one we have covered many varying topics, including multiculturalism and gender, and a lecture about ‘Community Music’ led by guest lecturer Tim Palmer.

Tim Palmer is Head of Education at Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance, with 25 years’ experience as an orchestral musician, a community musician, and in outreach work. His passion for community music is inspiring, and Tim describes music education as a tool for ‘communal change.’

Read the rest of this entry »

Lessons from a Laidlaw Scholar

By IOE Digital, on 26 October 2022

Do you want to research topics that you are passionate about? Do you want to be a better leader?

Perhaps the Laidlaw Undergraduate Research and Leadership Scholarship is for you!

by Princess Emeanuwa, Education Studies BA, Laidlaw Scholar 2022-23

It is pretty unusual to have the opportunity to work with researchers and experts in their field as a first-year undergraduate; therefore, the Laidlaw Scholarship programme is exceptional. What I have enjoyed so far is not only undertaking a research project (which I will talk about later) but also improving my leadership skills and personal development. Over the course of the scholarship, research projects are completed in the first summer over 6 weeks, and in the second, a Leadership-in-Action experience takes place in challenging environments.

Before I tell you about my experience as a first-year Laidlaw scholar, I want you to know that it’s okay if you are unsure whether you’re a fit for the programme because initially, I wasn’t even planning to apply. I only considered it because Gemma Gronland, who was my incredible tutor and Module lead for Education in an Age of Globalisation, encouraged me to check it out. I  looked at the research project titles, and when I saw the ASPIRES project and their passion for social justice, I was convinced to apply. And here is my first lesson, have an open mind. An open mind, for me, is the precursor to taking risks that could pay off in the end. After all, I had I not been open to Gemma’s suggestion; I would never have got the opportunity to work with the awesome ASPIRES team.

Now about my experience on the programme:

Read the rest of this entry »

Bouncing Back: Building Community and Fostering Belonging

By IOE Digital, on 10 August 2022

By Alex Wong, Social Sciences BSc

Starting my university journey in the middle of a global pandemic was not what I had in mind as I touched down (on a mostly empty flight) at Heathrow. I had never felt more out of sync in my life, lugging around my suitcases like a lifeline. The sharp contrast between reality and my ideal university life only served to magnify what I felt was missing from this new chapter – meeting new people, exploring a foreign place, while immersing myself in an academically rigorous program. Instead, the year passed by in a blur of lockdowns, zoom classes and monotony. One thing I did learn is that it is difficult to feel upbeat when the sun sets at 4pm as you’re watching from your window waiting for a takeout.

Read the rest of this entry »

My Work Experience Placement at Green Schools Project

By IOE Digital, on 5 August 2022

By Sakura Goto, Education Studies BA

Have you ever wondered if undergraduates on a three year course can get enough work experience before graduation?  The BA Education Studies has got this covered with a new module, the Education Studies Placement Module.

Read the rest of this entry »

My route to IOE

By IOE Digital, on 27 January 2022

Pupils wearing blue uniforms and safety glasses in a Science class

Pupils at UCL Academy. Credit: Matt Clayton for UCL.

By Kyle Meyers, Education (Science) MA

I was brought up in an environment of highly motivated educators in the form of my grandmother and both my parents. My mother has been a co-ordinator of the Pre–Primary section of a prominent school in south-central Mumbai and my deceased father, apart from being a radio-analyst by profession, was the proprietor of Meyers Teaching Institute, where he himself passionately taught along with a band of teachers. Since 2011, the demise of my father, I had to shoulder the mantle of running Meyers Teaching Institute, along with my mother when I was 15 years of age.

Read the rest of this entry »

Mental health at UCL: you are not alone

By IOE Digital, on 20 August 2020

Man listens to a female student talking while sitting on a bench outside the UCL Institute of Education

By Callum Flynn, Psychology with Education BSc

Starting University can be a scary feat for anybody – I know it was for me. But my biggest concerns may vary from those of many others. Research conducted by UniHealth found the most common concern for first years is not the money, food or academic performance, which can all be major worries, but rather friendship and making friends. However, for myself, and anybody else who suffers with their mental health, this is often the biggest concern. That being said, all other normal worries faced by first-year students add to this pressure.

Regardless of the point in your life you start university, whether as a student fresh from compulsory education, or a mature student like me, it’s normal to worry. Let me tell you are not alone if you are concerned about things such as whether or not you are going to be able to make friends, if you will have enough money to pay your rent, what you are going to eat or if you will be able to keep up with the workload of your course. These worries are always a concern for all new students, but for some of us who face challenges with our mental health, they can cause additional problems – from panic attacks due to anxiety, struggling with low mood from depression, through to coping with bipolar disorder.

Well, the good news is, you are not alone. These conditions some of us face daily will not prevent you from achieving your goals. There is also more good news and that is UCL is fantastic, in fact incredible, at providing the right support for those of us in need.

Read the rest of this entry »

PGCE Music – The Covid Cohort

By IOE Digital, on 13 August 2020

PGCE Music - Think About Things

By Rebecca Appleby

It is a steep learning curve for everyone when lessons move so abruptly to the virtual world. It took my year 12s longer than you might think to realise that I, another person on a video call, could see them texting each other, even though you would think they would do me the courtesy of trying to be subtle. It also took my year 10s at least three lessons to realise that the trick of joining a call, turning your video off, and then going back to sleep doesn’t work so well when you forget to leave the call at the end of the lesson. I see it as reassuring, however, that my students adapted so well to online teaching that they behaved in their normal, creatively disruptive ways.

We are taught during our PGCE year that our skills in thinking on our feet when a lesson does not go according to plan will be honed throughout the years, but not all years contain the challenges that 2020 has brought. This year has been a masterclass in adaptability; teachers and students all over the country have had to adjust to the school closures, making use of technology, and working to keep young people engaged in their education despite cancelled exams. As trainees, we had to adapt to our placements abruptly ending, and the disparities in subsequent training and department involvement.

Read the rest of this entry »

A Room with a View: Learning through Lockdown

By fola.brady.19, on 11 June 2020

Just as businesses are adapting to the remote working environment created by lockdown, so must staff and students at the IOE in order to maintain learning during Covid-19.

On a personal level, this has taken me from my room in Camden Town to the left-hand corner of my mother’s attic (there are birds living in the roof on the other side and I don’t particularly want to befriend them). Yet, even from my “desk” (read: shelf), with its temperamental Wi-Fi, soundtrack of occasional muffled arguments or hooting from the ceiling, and even the carousel of visiting cats – I feel I will have grown as a learner by the time I return to UCL.

Read the rest of this entry »