X Close

Digital Education team blog

Home

Ideas and reflections from UCL's Digital Education team

Menu

Archive for the 'Jessica’s Journal' Category

6 top tips to help you build your Twitter following

By Jessica Gramp, on 14 November 2016

Last week as part of the UCL Doctoral Schools’ Digital Identity and Scholarship course, Jessica Gramp from the Digital Education team ran a Tweet for a Week activity to help staff learn to use Twitter (see #ucldias). One of the questions asked by the participants was how to build a strong Twitter following.

Here are 6 top tips to help you build your Twitter following:

  1. TweetUpload a picture and fill in your Twitter bio with a bit about yourself – a mix of professional and personal interests is usual. You might link these to hashtags.
  2. Follow those with interests similar to your own.
  3. Use hashtags to attract more followers.
  4. Link to your Twitter from your other networks. E.g. LinkedIn, Facebook, email signature, business cards, websites.
  5. Tweet media, such as video and images.
  6. Track your most popular tweets using Twitter Analytics.

See 10 ways to build a large, quality Twitter following…

 

Have you got questions, ideas or experience here?

If so, please do share them, either via the Twitter hashtag #elearningUCL or (for UCL staff and students) via the UCL Moodle Users forum.

MyFeedback is now available to all UCL staff and students

By Jessica Gramp, on 17 October 2016

The MyFeedback dashboard is now available to all UCL students and staff.

MyFeedback is a new tool in UCL Moodle allowing students to view grades and feedback for any assessed work across all their Moodle courses, in one place. Personal Tutors can view the dashboard for each student to allow them to track progress and to help to inform discussions in personal tutorials.

Watch the video on how students can use the MyFeedback report:

The report helps students (supported by their personal tutors) to better understand the variety of feedback they receive, draw ties between different assessments and modules, and allow them to reflect on their feedback to see how they can improve in future assessments. It also allows module tutors and assessors and departmental administrators to see how their students are progressing within the modules they teach and support.

MyFeedback Feedback Comments tab

^ Click the image to view a larger version of the Feedback Comments page.

MyFeedback is available to students, personal tutors, course tutors and departmental administrators.

  • Students can view feedback and grades from their assessments across all their UCL Moodle course. They can also add self-reflective notes and copy & paste feedback from Turnitin into their report.
  • Personal tutors can see their tutees’ full MyFeedback reports across all the modules their students are studying. Note: personal tutors will not be able to link through to assessments on courses they do not have tutor access to.
  • Module tutors can see MyFeedback reports for their students containing assessment information for any modules they teach. They will not see any assessments for modules they do not teach (unless they have been granted tutor access to those Moodle courses).
  • Departmental administrators can see MyFeedback reports for all the Moodle courses within categories where they have been assigned departmental administrator access in Moodle. Categories in Moodle will either be for the entire  department, or might be broken down further into undergraduate and postgraduate modules. Staff requiring this access will need to ask their department’s current category level course administrator to assign them this role.

Sign up to the Arena Exchange MyFeedback workshop on 28th November 2016 to learn how to use this tool with your students.

You can navigate to your own MyFeedback reports via the MyFeedback block on the UCL Moodle home page.

Other institutions can download the plugin from Moodle.org.

Find out more about MyFeedback…

 

Box of Broadcasts August upgrade

By Jessica Gramp, on 3 August 2016

Box of Broadcasts TV

UCL staff and students have access to audio and video content from free-to-air TV and radio channels through UCL’s Box of Broadcasts subscription. Staff can also make clips and embed this media into their Moodle courses without worrying about infringing copyright. And unlike YouTube, the clip will remain indefinitely.

On 1 August 2016 the new Box of Broadcasts (BoB) went live with a fresh look, enhanced video quality and more powerful searching capabilities. The search now returns ordered results in a much easier to follow format.

From September, BoB will deliver a whole host of improvements:

  • A platform working across desktop, iOS and Android devices.
  • More powerful searching capabilities (using TRILT metadata).
  • Better programme coverage and a permanent archive of content from nine channels:
    • BBC1 London.
    • BBC2 .
    • BBC4.
    • ITV London.
    • Channel 4.
    • More4.
    • Channel 5.
    • BBC Radio 4.
    • BBC Radio 4 Extra.
  • Better thumbnail previews on search results.
  • Preview clips before saving.
  • Label your own clips.
  • Personalised email alerts when programmes are ready to view.
  • More detailed citation data.

Limited content and functionality during upgrade period

Throughout August some of BoB archive content and some functionality won’t be available during the upgrade period.

On 1 August you won’t be able to access your saved clips and playlists, but don’t worry these will be accessible again in September. Also, you may not be able to access some archive content broadcast before 1 July 2016. There will be some programmes in the archive available before this date but not everything.  The archive content and enhanced functionality will be restored in September, along with all the exciting new features. We apologise for any inconvenience caused during the upgrade period.

Find out more

You can now find Box of Broadcasts on their new Twitter handle @OnDemandBoB. All followers and previous tweets will stay attached to the new handle, so if you’re following us you don’t need to do anything. Just make sure you tag @OnDemandBoB in your BoB tweets, as the old handle will no longer be active.
To promote the BoB upgrade to staff and students here’s a short video highlighting all the exciting improvements.

Check out the new Box of Broadcasts

The new link to BoB is learningonscreen.ac.uk/ondemand.

However, bobnational.net  will redirect here so you can still use that.

Introducing the new E-Learning Baseline

By Jessica Gramp, on 7 June 2016

UCL E-Learning Baseline 2016The UCL E-Learning Baseline is now available as a printable colour booklet. This can be downloaded from the UCL E-Learning Baseline wiki page: http://bit.ly/UCLELearningBaseline

The 2016 version is a product of merging the UCL Moodle Baseline with the Student Minimum Entitlement to On-Line Support from the Institute of Education.

The Digital Education Advisory team will be distributing printed copies to E-Learning Champions and Teaching Administrators for use in departments.

Please could you also distribute this to your own networks to help us communicate the new guidelines to all staff.

Support is available to help staff apply this to their Moodle course templates via digi-ed@ucl.ac.uk.

We are also working on a number of ideas to help people understand the baseline (via a myth busting quiz) and a way for people to show their courses are Baseline (or Baseline+) compliant by way with a colleague endorsed badge.

See ‘What’s new?’, to quickly see what has changed since the last 2013 Baseline.

 

Spotlight on Engineering’s Learning Technologists in 2015: STEAPP

By Jessica Gramp, on 9 January 2016

Learning Technologies in Science, Technology, Engineering and Public Policy (STEaPP)

In Science, Technology, Engineering and Public Policy (STEaPP) learning technology support is provided by the department’s Learning Techologist (Alan Seatwo).  Part of this work involves assisting colleagues to explore the use of emerging teaching themes prior to the start of the MPA Programme. These sessions focus on implementing the UCL E-learning baseline, exploring classroom learning technology and using video for students’ presentation assessment and as a self reflection tool. Prevalent learning technologies in the department include the UCL Moodle Virtual Learning Environment (VLE), rapid eLearning development tools, video editing & production, cloud storage, webinars, screencasts, online surveys and classroom learning technologies, such as electronic voting handsets. In this post Alan explains how his department used learning technologies in 2015.

 

The department was already equipped with a collection of good quality video recorders and in August the department further invested in new hardware and software for video recording & editing, such as a range of camera/ mobile phone mounts, a tripod, wireless microphone and a copy of Adobe Creative Suite. In addition, streaming video and webinar platforms were explored during the organisation and delivery of a seminar by Professor Daniel Kammen and a written report was presented to the department for possible use in the future.

Doctoral student virtual presentation

Doctoral student virtual presentation

There have been no reports of teaching staff and students experiencing major issues using Moodle. Although there have been some maintenance down time from UCL networks, overall access to Moodle is excellent. Colleagues are supportive of the idea of using classroom-learning technology. Specifically, Word-Cloud was used in How to Change the World 2015; Kahoot! and Socrative were used in Policy Making and Policy Analysis; Communication and Project Management Skills; and the Vodafone – UCL Public Policy Intensive Programme. Feedback about the use of such software from colleagues and students was very positive.

UCLeXtend is a separate Moodle platform for external use. The Vodafone – UCL Public Policy Intensive Programme was granted the use of the platform to deliver the online learning elements. This enabled the department to experiment with organising and delivering online learning programmes to non-UCL users that might be useful for future use.

Vodafone UCL Public Policy Intensive Programme UCL eXtend course

Vodafone UCL Public Policy Intensive Programme UCL eXtend course

Students’ presentations were recorded, stored and made available for course assessment and self-reflection. The experience of exploring video streaming in Professor Kammen’s event enabled the process of screencasting, video recording and webinars to be refined. The average turn around time to deliver edited student presentation videos is around 24 hours after recording takes place.

Two Virtual Open Day sessions were conducted in Blackboard Collaborate (webinar software). A series of online interviews using BB Collaborate, Skype and Google Hangouts were also held with potential students.

Other learning technologies being used in the department include:

  • Opinio to support research activities in STEaPP Grant Research Funding Proposal Form, City Health Diplomacy and Science Diplomacy;
  • Articulate Storyline 2 to create two online self assessments in the undergraduate programme: ENGS102P: Design and Professional Skills 2015/16.

There have been no major issues reported by staff using Moodle to organise and disseminate learning content and facilitating discussion via the forums. The level of usage from students is also good. Data from Moodle shows that students responded to staff instructions to access learning content and submit their assignments electronically. One of the areas that can be further enhanced is the use of learning analytics, which can assist staff to identify usage trends of their designed activities and content.

Looking ahead: We are in the planning stage for How to Change the World 2016 and have two areas of focus at the moment: Online Attendance Recording and Reporting; and a Peer Reviewed Video Assignment. We are also making good progress on designing and developing an open-source learning object as part of a project funded by a grant from the UCL Centre for the Advancement of Learning and Teaching (CALT).

Introducing the My Feedback report

By Jessica Gramp, on 5 December 2015

The Moodle My Feedback report is being developed as part of a UCL project to improve access to assessment feedback by both students and staff.

The My feedback report consolidates information that already exists in Moodle and displays it in a single view, in a format that is easily accessible and digestible, and therefore more meaningful for students and staff than what is currently available to them in disparate parts of Moodle. My feedback shows a view of grades and feedback for assessment activities, such as Moodle Assignments, Turnitin Assignments, Workshops for Peer Assessments and Quizzes from across modules in a single report. The report provides links to submissions and any feedback that has been released to students, including grades.

The report helps students (supported by their Personal Tutors) to better understand the variety of feedback they receive; draw ties between different assessments and modules; and allow them to reflect on their feedback to see how they can improve in future assessments.

NOTE: Unless a Personal Tutor has tutor-level access to the course where the assessments are stored, they will be unable to view the feedback directly.

The My feedback report is currently being piloted by a number of programmes at UCL, to better understand how it can be used by staff and students and to help guide future development work.

 

The My feedback report is available as an open source plugin on Moodle.org: https://moodle.org/plugins/view.php?plugin=report_myfeedback

An updated version was released Saturday 5th December 2015.

 

Feedback Overview

The overview page shows all the assessments available for a particular student, with links to viewing the full feedback within Moodle. For someone to view the full feedback they must have access to viewing that activity on the Moodle course it resides in.

 

Overview screen

Feedback comments

The Feedback comments page shows general feedback and grades that have been provided via Moodle. Note: feedback provided via Turnitin GradeMark can not be displayed in this report, although the grade will be displayed if entered using the standard Turnitin grading feature. The date the feedback was viewed by that student is also visible. A cross indicates the feedback has not yet been viewed.

feedback comments tab

 

 

There is further information about this tool from the ALT-Conference 2015:

https://altc.alt.ac.uk/2015/sessions/moodle-my-feedback-assessment-reports-for-staff-and-students-950