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Digital Classicist & ICS Seminar: Fragmentary Texts and Digital Collections of Fragmentary Authors

SimonMahony27 July 2010

Friday July 30th at 16:30

STB9 (Stewart House), Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU

Monica Berti (Torino) and Marco Büchler (Leipzig)

‘Fragmentary Texts and Digital Collections of Fragmentary Authors’

**All Welcome**

Fragmentary texts are not only material remains of ancient writings, but also quotations of lost texts preserved through other texts: in this seminar the speakers will show how methods of computer scientists and methodologies of classicists can be combined to represent fragmentary sources in a digital library of ancient testimonies. (full abstract)

The seminar will be followed by wine and refreshments.

For the full programme see:
http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2010.html

Simon Mahony from UCLDH, co-organises the Digital Classicist, as well as the summer seminar series. We also have a email discussion list and wiki.  All are welcome to seminars so please do attend if you can.

If you have an interest but are unable to come along, the seminars are podcast with the slides at:
http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2010.html

Digital Classicist & ICS Seminar: On-demand Virtual Research Environments: a case study from the Humanities

SimonMahony19 July 2010

This week’s session in the Digital Classicist ICS summer seminar series is from  Mike Priddy who is based at the Centre for e-Research at King’s College London.

Friday July 23rd at 16:30
STB9 (Stewart House), Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU

Mike Priddy (King’s College London)
‘On-demand Virtual Research Environments: a case study from the Humanities’

**ALL WELCOME**

Virtual Research Environments are often highly specialised concentrating efforts around a single collection. The gMan project aims to demonstrate cross-collection discovery, annotation, reporting & management in an on-demand VRE (using gCube) with three heterogeneous classical collections: The Heidelberger Gesamtverzeichnis (HGV), Projet Volterra & The Inscriptions of Aphrodisias (IAph).
(full abstract)
The seminar will be followed by wine and refreshments.

For the full programme see:
http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2010.html

Simon Mahony from UCLDH, co-organises the Digital Classicist, as well as the summer seminar series. We also have a email discussion list and wiki.  All are welcome to seminars so please do attend if you can.

If you have an interest but are unable to come along, the seminars are podcast with the slides at:
http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2010.html
with an RSS feed you can subscribe to.

Academics Twittering on?

Claire SRoss27 January 2010

Twitter is everywhere. It is one of the key web 2.0 applications that grown hugely in the last year and is now being is being used by everyone and anyone. But does it have any use in academia? Or is it just narcissistic twaddle?

Last year I attended the excellent Museums and the Web conference in Indianapolis, not only was the selection of sessions and speakers great, but it was their attempts to amplify the conference that really interested and engaged people. The basic idea behind an amplified conference is making use if tools like wikis, blogs, photo sharing etc to build a community around an conference prior, during and post the event. I went to the conference on my own, I didn’t really know many people and was intimidated by the masses of incredibly clever people that were surrounding me, and then I entered the backchannel… I was able to view other peoples comments, discussions and ideas on the blogs and follow in real time what was going on via Twitter, I was absorbed and I felt that my opinion was valid and relevant. It was great.

Recently however there has been a lot of bad press of Twitter use, as being disruptive and distracting and can even turn quite nasty, so perhaps my experience was not the norm, the exception to the rule. Perhaps Twitter is just a tool for individuals to reveal far to much about themselves, for naval gazing, plain rudeness and self indulgence? So we did some investigating…

Few studies have been undertaken to make explicit how technologies, like Twitter, are used by scholars and whether they have any benefit to the academic community. So we started a little research paper looking specifically at the use of Twitter as a digital backchannel by the Digital Humanities community, taking as its focus postings to Twitter during three different international 2009 conferences, That Camp 09, DH09, and DRHA09.

We ask the following questions:

  • Does the use of a Twitter enabled backchannel enhance the conference experience, collaboration and the co-construction of knowledge, or is it a disruptive, disparaging and a inconsequential tool full of ‘pointless babble’?
  • How is microblogging used within an academic conference setting, and can we articulate the benefits it may bring to a discipline?

You can find a copy of the paper here

And the Twitter archive for the conferences are below:

http://twapperkeeper.com/dh09/

http://twapperkeeper.com/thatcamp/

http://twapperkeeper.com/drha09/
and
http://twapperkeeper.com/drha2009/

the early DH09 Tweets which were missed by Twapper Keeper can be found in this handy excel sheet

The paper has been submitted for consideration to a journal, and we have their permission to put up this draft copy to elicit some discussion about its contents from the community it features. Do you agree with our findings? Is there anything else you would like to see covered? Does your personal experience of using twitter in a scholarly context differ from what we have discovered?