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Vision for Art (VISART) Workshop for interdisciplinary work in Computer Vision and Digital Humanities

Lucy Stagg26 April 2022

The VISion for Art (VISART) workshop is an interdisciplinary workshop held with the European Conference on Computer Vision (ECCV) on a bi-annual basis. The workshop is now on its 6th edition and has had great success over ten years since starting in Florence (2012), with the 2022 edition in Tel Aviv, Israel. The success has led to VISART becoming a staple venue for Computer Vision and Digital Art History & Humanities researchers alike. With the workshop’s ambition to bring the disciplines closer and provide a venue for interdisciplinary communication, it has, since 2018, provided two tracks for both the technological development and the reflection of computer vision techniques applied to the arts. The two tracks are:

1. Computer Vision for Art – technical work (standard ECCV submission, 14 pages excluding references)
2. Uses and Reflection of Computer Vision for Art (Extended abstract, 4 pages, excluding references)

Full details are available at the workshop website: https://visarts.eu

Keynotes

In addition to the technical works presented it regularly attracts names that bridge the disciplines including (but not limited to):

Keynote speakers from across the years of VISART, images from 2022 public institutional profiles and current affiliation logos.

Keynote speakers from across the years of VISART, images from 2022 public institutional profiles and current affiliation logos.

The inclusion of such a varied collection of Keynote speakers has provided a fruitful discussion on the use of technology to investigate visual content. From its style and perception (Aaron Hertzmann, Adobe) to how is the “hard humanities” field of computer image analysis of art changing our understanding of paintings and drawings (David G. Stork).

VISART VI Keynotes

The VISART VI (2022) workshop continues this tradition of high profile keynotes. It will add Prof Béatrice Joyeux-Prunel of the University of Geneva and Prof Ohad Ben-Shahar of Ben Gurion University to this list and the return of Prof John Collomosse of the University of Surrey.

VISART VI Keynotes

VISART VI Keynotes

Prof Béatrice Joyeux-Prunel

Béatrice Joyeux-Prunel is Full Professor at the University of Geneva in Switzerland (Faculté de Lettres – School of Humanities), chair of Digital Humanities. From 2007 to 2019 she was Associate Professor (maître de conférences) in modern and contemporary art at the École normale supérieure in Paris, France (ENS, PSL). She is a former student of ENS (Alumni 1996, Social Sciences and Humanities), and got an Agrégation in History and Geography in 1999. She defended her PhD in 2005 at the université Paris I Panthéon Sorbonne and her Habilitation at Sciences Po Paris in 2015. Joyeux-Prunel’s research encompasses the history of visual globalisation, the global history of the avant-gardes, the digital technologies in contemporary art, and the digital turn in the Humanities. Since 2009 she has founded and managed the Artl@s project on modern and contemporary art globalisation ([https://artlas.huma-num.fr](https://artlas.huma-num.fr/)) and she coedits the open access journal Artlas Bulletin. In 2016 she founded Postdigital ([www.postdigital.ens.fr](https://visarts.eu/www.postdigital.ens.fr)), a research project on digital cultures and imagination. Since 2019 she has led the European Jean Monnet Excellence Center IMAGO, an international center for the study and teaching on visual globalisation. At Geneva university she directs the SNF Project Visual Contagions ([https://visualcontagions.unige.ch](https://visualcontagions.unige.ch/)), a 4 years research project on images in globalisation, which uses computer vision techniques to trace the global circulation of images in printed material over the 20th century.

Prof John Collomosse

John Collomosse is a Principal Scientist at Adobe Research where he leads the deep learning group. John’s research focuses on representation learning for creative visual search (e.g. sketch, style, pose based search) and for robust image fingerprinting and attribution. He is a part-time full professor at the Centre for Vision Speech and Signal Processing, University of Surrey (UK) where he founded and co-directs the DECaDE multi-disciplinary research centre exploring the intersection of AI and Distributed Ledger Technology. John is part of the Adobe-led content authenticity initiative (CAI) and contributor to the technical work group of the C2PA open standard for digital provenance. He is on the ICT and Digital Economy advisory boards for the UK Science Council EPSRC.

Prof. Ohad Ben-Shahar

Ohad Ben-Shahar is a Professor of Computer Science at the Computer Science department, Ben Gurion University (BGU), Israel. He received his [B.Sc](http://b.sc/). and [M.Sc](http://m.sc/). in Computer Science from the Technicon (Israel Institute of Technology) in 1989 and 1996, respectively, and his M.Phill and PhD From Yale University, CT, USA in 1999 and 2003, respectively. He is a former chair of the Computer Science department and the present head of the School of Brain Sciences and Cognition at BGU. Prof Ben-Shahar’s research area focuses on computational vision, with interests that span all aspects of theoretical, experimental, and applied vision sciences and their relationship to cognitive science as a whole. He is the founding director of the interdisciplinary Computational Vision Laboratory (iCVL), where research involves theoretical computational vision, human perception and visual psychophysics, visual computational neuroscience, animal vision, applied computer vision, and (often biologically inspired) robot vision. He is a principle investigator in numerous research activities, from basic research animal vision projects through applied computer vision, data sciences, and robotics consortia, many of them funded by agencies such as the ISF, NSF, DFG, the National Institute for Psychobiology, The Israeli Innovation Authority, and European frameworks such as FP7 and Horizon 2020.

Call for Papers

The workshop calls for papers on the topics (but not limited to):

  • Art History and Computer Vision
  • 3D reconstruction from visual art or historical sites
  • Multi-modal multimedia systems and human machine interaction
  • Visual Question & Answering (VQA) or Captioning for Art
  • Computer Vision and cultural heritage
  • Big-data analysis of art
  • Security and legal issues in the digital presentation and distribution of cultural information
  • Image and visual representation in art
  • 2D and 3D human pose and gesture estimation in art
  • Multimedia databases and digital libraries for artistic research
  • Interactive 3D media and immersive AR/VR for cultural heritage
  • Approaches for generative art
  • Media content analysis and search
  • Surveillance and Behaviour analysis in Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums

Deadlines & Submissions

  • Full & Extended Abstract Paper Submission: 27th May 2022 (23:59 UTC-0)
  • Notification of Acceptance: 30th June 2022
  • Camera-Ready Paper Due: 12th July 2022
  • Workshop: TBA (23-27th October 2022)
  • Submission site: https://cmt3.research.microsoft.com/VISART2022/

Organisers

The VISART VI 2022 edition of the workshop has been organised by:

  • Alessio Del Bue, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT)
  • Peter Bell, Philipps-Universität Marburg
  • Leonardo Impett, University of Cambridge
  • Noa Garcia, Osaka University
  • Stuart James, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT) & University College London Centre for Digital Humanities (UCL DH)
VISART VI 2022 organisers

VISART VI 2022 organisers

Call for presentations: ‘Art and Digital Technology’ show and tell

Lucy Stagg15 November 2021

UCL Centre for Digital Humanities and the UCL Slade School of Fine Art are coordinating a virtual show&tell on Wednesday 16th February, 5-7pm, via Zoom.

people interacting with digital art in Japan

We invite proposals for short presentations from staff and research students whose work involves art and digital technology/media (we welcome any interpretation of this theme).

If you would like to give a 10 minute presentation on your current research/project please email lucy.stagg@ucl.ac.uk by 26th November, giving a brief title or outline of your talk. Registration for the event will open in December, once the schedule of presenters has been finalised.

Photo by note thanun on Unsplash

CFP: Open Digital Scholarship in the Humanities #OpenHUMS

Lucy Stagg6 March 2020

4 May 2020, UCL Institute for Advanced Studies.

Proposals due: March 27th 2020

Humanists are increasingly looking to open, digital methods as an integral part of their scholarship’s dissemination and engagement. Rooted in digital humanities, open source software, the OA movement, new media, book history, and many other areas, open digital scholarship is celebrated for its potential to strengthen academic and academic-aligned collaboration among many communities, both within and beyond those that are a part of the conventional university system and traditional publication methods. As Martin Paul Eve writes: “Indeed, if [humanities] disciplines are historically situated within the tradition of liberal humanism, in which the humanities help to create an informed and critical populace, then should not the amplification of scholarship go beyond those circles? Could such a broader base […] help to cement the public reputation of the academic humanities?” (Open Access and the Humanities [2014]). Kathleen Fitzpatrick echoes: “If we hope to engage the public with our work, we need to ensure that it is open in the broadest possible sense” (Generous Thinking [2019]). These sentiments are given life via practices such as crowdsourcing, which, as Mia Ridge notes, act “as a form of engagement with the collections and research of memory institutions” and “[benefit]  both audiences and institutions” (Crowdsourcing Our Cultural Heritage [2014]).

Open Digital Scholarship in the Humanities draws together those who are involved in the creation, dissemination, management, and archiving of open digital scholarship. We are pleased to announce that Martin Paul Eve (Birkbeck College, University of London) and Mia Ridge (British Library) are featured speakers for the event, and that Claire Warwick (Durham University) will act as respondent. This action-oriented event is geared toward leaders and learners from all fields and arenas, including academic and non-academic researchers, graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, librarians and archivists, publishers, members of scholarly and professional associations and consortia, open source practitioners and developers, industry liaisons, community groups, and other stakeholders.

We invite proposals for short presentations, talks, and relevant project demonstrations to the end of raising awareness, provoking conversation, and mobilising collaboration in and around open digital scholarship. Proposals should contain a title, an abstract (of approximately 250 words, plus list of works cited), and the names and affiliations, of presenters. Please send proposals on or before March 27th 2020 via http://bit.ly/OpenHUMS

Broader areas to consider may include the following: How can open digital scholarship in the humanities be transformative and world-leading? Should it be? Building out from this question, specific areas of focus for Open Digital Scholarship in the Humanities include community building, collaboration, and mobilization, as well as shared initiatives, activities, and partnership in regard to digital scholarly production, social knowledge creation, (open) access, and knowledge dissemination. This event asks,“What are the best examples of current open digital scholarship projects and practices in the United Kingdom, and beyond? How do we connect with various publics over open, digital scholarship? How do we build productive feedback loops?” There will be a thematic emphasis on modes and methods, including in academic publ ishing practices, infrastructure, and research data management. Moreover, we encourage discussion on how open digital scholarship differs field-to-field and across community and geographic boundaries, as well as how it can be leveraged internationally and where the stumbling blocks are for doing so.

Open Digital Scholarship in the Humanities is supported by Loughborough University and the Leverhulme Trust, the UCL Centre for Digital Humanities, the University of London School of Advanced Study, and the Implementing New Knowledge Environments (INKE) Partnership. This gathering is related to previous partnered events with the INKE Partnership in Canada and the Canadian-Australian Partnership for Open Scholarship (CAPOS) in Australia. Open Digital Scholarship in the Humanities is organized by Ray Siemens (University of Victoria), Alyssa Arbuckle (University of Victoria), Lise Jaillant (Loughborough University), Simon Mahony (University College London), and Jane Winters (School of Advanced Study).

Please consider joining us in London for what is sure to be a dynamic discussion!

Graphics and Cultural Heritage (GCH)

Lucy Stagg2 May 2017

UCLDH Acting Director, Professor Tim Weyrich, will be the papers chair at Graphics and Cultural Heritage (GCH), an international workshop in Graz, Austria in September 2017. The workshop invites works from both the heritage and engineering sectors:

It aims to foster an international dialogue between ICT experts and CH scientists to advance the understanding of critical requirements for processing, managing, and delivering cultural information to a broad audience.

Papers are due for submission by Friday 5th May 2017.

CFP: 2014 OCWC Global Conference

Simon Mahony26 October 2013

The 2014 OCWC Global Conference is being held in Ljubljana, Slovenia. One of the local organisers is a completing MA/MSc DH student, Davor Orlic.

The 10th annual OpenCourseWare Consortium Global Conference will be held in Ljubljana, Slovenia, on April 23-25, 2014. The OpenCourseWare Consortium and the Knowledge for All Foundation are jointly organizing the event whose special theme is Open Education for a Multicultural World.

Submissions of papers are invited on all topics related to open education for the conference proceedings, and proposals for workshops.

The conference will be organised around four tracks:

  • Research and Technology
  • Open Educational Policies
  • Pedagogical Impact
  • Project Dissemination

Submission deadline: December 1st 2013.

Full details are on the conference website and downloadable as a PDF.

 

Digital Pedagogies: E-Learning and Digital Humanities Unconference – Call for Session Proposals

Sarah Davenport8 April 2013

Digital Pedagogies: E-Learning and Digital Humanities Unconference
13 June 2013

Call for Session Proposals

UCL Centre for Digital Humanities, in partnership with the Higher Education Academy, will be hosting a FREE ‘unconference’* focusing on bringing together the e-learning and digital humanities communities to discuss the development of ‘Digital Pedagogies’ in University teaching. We want to hear your ideas for sessions!

* An ‘unconference’ structure is delegate-driven with the agenda created by the attendees on the day. There is an open call for presentations on the topic of enhancing and developing digital pedagogies in your field of research.

About ‘Digital Pedagogies Unconference’
‘Digital Pedagogies’ are innovative methods of teaching – using ICT tools to facilitate and foster a high quality digital learning space. There are big questions around how teaching techniques can be modified and digital enhanced to meet the needs of 21st century virtual learning. The objective of this unconference will be firstly to bring together these e-learning and digital humanities communities with what are often similar research objectives, and secondly provide a space to speak about current digital teaching techniques, defining areas for improvement and enhancement.

What do I propose?
There are roughly four things people do in sessions: Talk, Make, Teach, and Play. Sometimes one session contains elements of all these, but it’s also a fair taxonomy for sessions. In a Talk session proposal, you offer to lead a group discussion on a topic or question of interest to you. In a Make session proposal, you offer to lead a small group in a hands-on collaborative working session with the aim of producing a draft document or piece of software. In a Teach session, you offer to teach a skill, either a “hard” skill or a “soft” skill. In a Play session, anything goes — you suggest literally playing a game, or you suggest some quality group playtime with one or more technologies, or what you will. Of course, these are just guides – we are open to new ideas, new ways of interaction and methods of making this unconference insightful and fun!

How do I propose a session?
There are two ways of proposing a session:
(1) through the THATCAMP Digital Pedagogies site at http://digitalpedagogies2013.thatcamp.org/registerproposal/ or
(2) by emailing Rachel at
rachel.kasbohm.11@ucl.ac.uk
with a brief proposal.

*Remember* that you will be expected to facilitate the sessions you propose, so that if you propose a hacking session, you should have the germ of a project to work on; if you propose a workshop, you should be prepared to teach it or find a teacher; if you propose a discussion of the Digital Public Library of America, you should be prepared to summarize what that is, begin the discussion, keep the discussion going, and end the discussion.

To register as a delegate: http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/events/detail/2013/13_June_digital_pedagogies_UCL

More information: Please visit http://digitalpedagogies2013.thatcamp.org/

Questions, comments or concerns? Contact Rachel at
rachel.kasbohm.11@ucl.ac.uk

InterFace 2011: Call for Participation

Claire S Ross11 February 2011

InterFace is a symposium for humanities and technology. In 2011 it is being jointly organised by colleges across London and will be an invaluable opportunity for participants to visit this active hub of digital scholarship and practice. InterFace is a conference organised by post-graduates for post-graduates in technology and the humanities.   It’s part conference, part forum, part networking opportunity. The aim is to promote collaboration and shared understanding between researchers in the humanities and in computer science, especially where their efforts converge on exchange of subject matter and method.

All the Interface2011 organisers are in varying stages of Doctoral research, and this flexibility and informal approach is something which really appeals to us as organisers. UCLDH has two research students on the InterFace committee myself and Alejandro Giacometti. We really want InterFace to be a symposium and networking opportunity in order to stimulate collaborations and new research directions. You can find out more about the orgainsers over on the InterFace site.

It combines the best aspects of a skills workshop, conference talks, and networking.  I think the networking aspect is what I like the most, because despite working as researcher for a while now, I have just started my PhD, I don’t really know what to expect from it and it will be great to talk to like minded people.

One of the core components, and the aspect I find very appealing, is the Lightening Talks. The challenge is to convey your research succinctly, clearly and quickly in 2 minutes.  I am a firm believer if you know your research then explaining it in 2minutes flat should be no problem at all.  The call for lightening talk proposals has just gone out, so if any post graduates or early year researchers in Digital Humanities want to take up the challenge, please do send in a proposal. You can submit your application here: http://www.interface2011.org.uk/submit.

The deadline for applications is Friday 25 February 2011.

Remix Cinema Workshop: call for presentations & papers

Sarah Davenport16 November 2010

— forwarded by Tim Davies,  Events and Administrative Officer from the Oxford Internet Institute —

The Remix Cinema workshop is organised by the Oxford Internet Institute, (University of Oxford, UK) in collaboration with UNIA Prácticas y Culturas Digitales (Universidad Internacional de Andalucía, ES), and is funded by the UK’s Art and Humanities Research Council’s (AHRC) Beyond Text programme.

Website: www.remixcinema.org

Abstracts deadline: January 7, 2011.

Context

In August 2010, the remix movie Star Wars Uncut was the first user-generated production to win an Emmy Award. Other online platforms such as wreckamovie.com enable online communities to form for independent and open source filmmaking, harnessing distributed forms of collaborative co-creation rather than relying on traditional organisational structures. Cloud-based editing suites have begun appearing: Stroome.com was launched in April 2010 by USC Annenberg with the tag-line “mix it up. mash it out”. Digitalised photos, videos, and sound, easily accessible through popular websites, constitute a diverse online repository of content that is being used for artistic remix purposes. Recently, the Electronic Frontier Foundation won a court case giving exemptions from the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) anticircumvention provisions to amateur remix video artists sharing their works on e.g. YouTube. VJ’s and live cinema artists (e.g. Dj Spooky, Eclectic Method or SOLU) have permeated multiple cultural settings, ranging from mainstream contexts of entertainment to museums and other spaces devoted to the institutionalisation of art practices.

The examples outlined are just a few fitting under the umbrella term of “Remix Cinema”, and point to ways in which networked devices and resources are facilitating new artistic audiovisual practices and cultures. The concept of ‘remix’ describes a broad set of social and cultural practices centered around the fragmentation and re-ordering of already existing and new content, whether text, sound or images. This 2-day multi-disciplinary workshop focuses on these diverse creative practices, particularly in the context of the contemporary socio-technical media environment. It brings together people interested in understanding and shaping remix cinema: doctoral students, established scholars, practicing artists, and anyone else interested in addressing themes related to questions including:

  • How is the contemporary media-scape influencing artistic audio-visual creation?
  • What can we learn from the changing practices in remix cinema?
  • How are new models of economic support (e.g. crowdfunding) changing productions of cultural objects?
  • What methodological and theoretical challenges arise in empirical studies on remix cinema, and how do we overcome these?

Call for presentations & papers

The workshop committee welcomes proposals on any social, critical, cultural, aesthetic, political, technical, economic or legal aspects of remix cinema practices, cultures and works. We particularly welcome contributions that report on empirical studies and adopt innovative methodological approaches. Each presentation should last for a maximum of 15 minutes. Participants may present finished studies or works-in-progress, as the workshop also serves as a forum for gaining valuable feedback and exchanging ideas. All proposals will be peer reviewed by at least two members of the workshop’s academic committee (Oxford Internet Institute faculty).

Presenters are invited to submit full papers which will be eligible for review and possible inclusion in a subsequent ISBN publication on remix cinema.

Books and Reading in the Digital Age

Claire L H Warwick23 August 2010

We are pleased to announce the second one day conference organised by UCLDH’s INKE project, and hope you will consider submitting a proposal.

Research Foundations for Understanding Books and Reading in the Digital Age: Textual Methodologies and Exemplars
15 December 2010
Koninklijke Bibliotheek (National Library of the Netherlands), The Hague
in conjunction with the conference Text & Literacy (16-17 December)
Proposals due 30 September 2010

Digital technology is fundamentally altering the way we relate to writing, reading, and the human record itself. The pace of that change has created a gap between core social/cultural practices that depend on stable reading and writing environments and the new kinds of digital artefacts–electronic books being just one type of many–that must sustain those practices now and into the future.

This one-day gathering explores research foundations pertinent to understanding those new practices and emerging media, specifically focusing on work in textual method, in itself and via exemplar, leading toward [1] theorizing the transmission of culture in pre- and post-electronic media, [2] documenting the facets of how people experience information as readers and writers, [3] designing new kinds of interfaces and artifacts that afford new reading abilities, [4] conceptualizing the issues necessary to provide information to these new reading and communicative environments, and [5] reflection on interdisciplinary team research strategies pertinent to work in the area.

The gathering is offered in conjunction with the Text & Literacy conference (16-17 December) and is sponsored by the Koninklijke Bibliotheek (the National Library of the Netherlands), the Book and Digital Media Studies department of Leiden University, and the Implementing New Knowledge Environments research group.

We invite paper and poster/demonstration proposals that address these and other issues pertinent to research in the area. Proposals should contain a title, an abstract (of approximately 250 words) plus list of works cited, and the names, affiliations, and website URLs of presenters; fuller papers will be solicited after acceptance of the proposal. Please send proposals before 30 September 2010 to siemens@uvic.ca.

Call for Papers: e-Science 2010

Claire S Ross28 June 2010

IEEE e-Science 2010 Conference
7 – 10 DECEMBER 2010

The sixth IEEE e–Science conference, sponsored by the IEEE Computer Society´s Technical Committee for Scalable Computing (TCSC), will be held in Brisbane, Australia from 7th – 10th December 2010.

Scientific research is increasingly carried out by communities of researchers that span disciplines, laboratories, organizations, and national boundaries. The e-Science 2010 conference is designed to bring together leading international and interdisciplinary research communities, developers, and users of e-Science applications and enabling IT technologies. The conference serves as a forum to present the results of the latest research and product/tool developments and to highlight related activities from around the world.

Call for Papers

Building on last year’s emphasis, they are particularly interested in advances in the application of technology in a particular discipline. Accordingly, significant advances in practice will be considered as important as the development of new technologies themselves. Further, we welcome contributions in educational activities under any of these disciplines.

The conference will be structured around a number of e-Science themes, shown below:

Arts, Humanities and e-Social Science
Bioinformatics and Health
Physical Sciences and Engineering
Climate & Earth Sciences
Research Tools, Workflow and systems, novel infrastructure
Digital Repositories and Data Management
Education and e-Science practice
It is expected that the proceedings will be published by the IEEE Computer Society Press, USA and will be made available online through the IEEE Digital Library.

Call for Papers e-Science 2010 (PDF 116kb)

Submission Process

Authors are invited to submit papers with unpublished, original work of not more than 8 pages of double column text using single spaced 10 point size on 8.5 x 11 inch pages, as per IEEE 8.5 x 11 manuscript guidelines.

Templates are available from here: http://www.ieee.org/web/publications/pubservices/confpub/AuthorTools/conferenceTemplates.html.

Authors should submit a PDF or PostScript (level 2) file that will print on a PostScript printer. Papers conforming to the above guidelines can be submitted through the e-Science 2010 paper submission system.

It is expected that the proceedings will be published by the IEEE CS Press, USA and will be made available online through the IEEE Digital Library.

It is a requirement that at least one author of each accepted paper attend the conference.

Papers should be submitted to: https://cmt2.research.microsoft.com/ESCIENCE10/

Important dates

Papers Due: Friday 16th July 2010

Notification of Acceptance: 3rd September 2010