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Learning on Screen: copyright training

Hazel M Ingrey17 February 2022

https://www.flickr.com/photos/creativecliche/6476864177; https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

‘Roll of film’ by Dale Mastin-Purcell is licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

We often have questions around using audiovisual works in teaching or research and, whilst we are always very happy to help you with specific questions, if you regularly work with audiovisual material it can be helpful to find out more so you can re-use or create with more confidence in future.

Learning on Screen (formerly the BUFVC) specialise in moving image in education.  Their online training course ‘Copyright and creative re-use in Education’ has new dates added for March and April 2022.  As they describe it:

‘This course will explore the main copyright issues related to lawfully accessing, using and producing audiovisual works in educational settings. Primarily aimed at teachers, students, academics, researchers, librarians, and other people dealing with audiovisual works in education, this course will help attendees understand the conditions under which audiovisual works can be used lawfully for educational purposes; and how mash ups and other derivative works can be created and exploited within and beyond educational settings. In particular, the course will address the challenges posed by copyright law in relation to moving to online teaching.’

UCL is a member of Learning on Screen so chose the discounted option if you choose to book!  This course can also be booked for an institution or department.

If you have a different copyright training topic in mind that would help your department or group of students, do get in touch with UCL Copyright and we will tailor training to suit you!

 

Workshop: BFI archive

Hazel M Ingrey19 September 2017

Some rights reserved CC BY-NC https://www.flickr.com/photos/practicalowl/4938047296/ ; https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/

Celuloid secrets by Kit

 

Calling film and media students, and teaching staff!  Copyright issues around re-using audiovisual material are complex, particularly in student assessment such as film essays: this free, October workshop could help you in your studies or teaching.

Run by the BFI, Learning on Screen and Kingston School of Art, this half-day workshop will explore the creative use of archive material, for Higher Education studies.

Participants will raise their awareness of copyright considerations in re-using archival moving-image works, and consider creative and pedagogic approaches to using this kind of material.

The workshop also marks the launch of an initiative to open up the BFI archive to student film makers, and a recent pilot scheme using BFI archive material will be presented.

Attendance is free but registration required. 18 October 2017, 11.00 – 14.00 at the BFI Southbank. Full details  are on the Learning on Screen website.

 

Starting out: copyright training

Hazel M Ingrey14 February 2017

‘Education’ by NY

 

It can be intimidating looking into copyright for the first time and some students put it off until their thesis has already been written.  If you can face the subject head-on before you even start a project you will save time later! Here are a few courses and resources to get started with.

The British Library Business and IP Centre has some great sessions coming up in the next month: many are re-run so visit the British Library events pages to see future sessions.

A free webinar ‘Introduction to Copyright’ is a perfect easy-starter: it is just an hour and can be viewed from your home computer.

The Intellectual Property Office has designed some guidance for students and teachers, found on their IP in Education page.  The IP Tutor course is free and you can work through it in around 40 minutes.

We are sometimes asked about Patients and Trade Marks, which come under the umbrella of Intellectual Property Rights (IPR), along with copyright.  This might be a query from a student designing some software as part of their study, or from academics co-creating an app with a colleague or student.  The British Library’s ‘How can I protect a business idea’ is a free, half day workshop which outlines IPR and which rights may apply to your project or business.  This could be a good foundation for more in-depth sessions such as the Mini-Masterclass Copyright for business. I particularly like the look of this session as it covers copyright in everyday situations such as photographs, music, websites.

For more tailored training, our Copyright Support Officer often visits groups of postgraduate students to give an overview of copyright, or talk about copyright in your thesis.  Do get in touch if you would like to arrange a session for your students.