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CLA data collection January 2020

Hazel M Ingrey11 December 2019

The Copyright Licensing Agency (CLA) will be conducting a photocopying data collection exercise at UCL in January 2020 for six weeks.

UCL holds a CLA Higher Education licence and it is part of our licence agreement that they occasionally undertake this survey; the last was held at UCL in 2010.  The purpose of the exercise is for the CLA to gather information to inform how they redistribute money to authors and publishers: it is also referred to as a ‘Royalties data’ exercise.

If you are a member of UCL staff who prepares teaching material for students, then this exercise is relevant to you!

The data collection involves a CLA field officer placing a large yellow box next to selected UCL MFDs (multi-functional devices), for teaching staff to drop in a copy of the item they are photocopying.  Near the box will be a notice to explaining the process, plus some sticky data labels.

  • If you are photocopying from a UCL MFD (not digitising);
  • for teaching purposes (for example making multiple copies to hand to students in class);
  • and from a published resource such as a book or journal, then:

Please take a photocopy of the identifying page of the text, e.g. the front page or the reverse side with copyright information on. The information needed is title, author, publisher details, ISSN, etc.  Complete a data label, stick it to the identifying page you have just photocopied;  post this into the yellow box.  Only the identifying page is needed, not the whole extract you are copying.

 

The collection will take place from 13th January to the 21st February 2020: the yellow boxes will start to appear from 6th January and will be removed in the week of 24th February.

There are some FAQs below.  If any questions are not addressed here, please don’t hesitate to contact Hazel Ingrey or UCL Copyright.

 

FAQs

Why is this exercise necessary?

The CLA use this data to inform their secondary royalty payments to authors and publishers. They collect data from all institutions that hold a CLA licence and use this to pay rights holders.

 

I don’t see a yellow CLA box next to my copier.

As UCL is so large, with in excess of 800 MFDs, ISD has assisted the CLA in making a representative selection of around 170 copiers.  If there is no CLA box you don’t need to participate in the data collection.

 

I don’t photocopy for my class, only use digital readings.  Do I need to submit any extra data?

No.  If you are linking to subscribed resources through your online reading list, you are not using any licence (indeed not even copying) and don’t need to report this.

If you are using the CLA licence by digitising through the TLS course readings service, then reporting requirements are already covered for you.

 

I am photocopying for my research, do I need to add a copy to the box?

No.  The CLA licence only covers copying for teaching purposes.  If you are copying for your own private study or research, and only making one copy for your use, then you don’t need to add anything to the box.  Your copying will likely fall under a CDPA copyright exception (for example s.29) instead.

 

Can I photocopy anything?

Only published material is relevant for this exercise.  In addition, you should always bear in mind what the CLA licence actually covers when copying readings for your class (in any format).

For reassurance you can use the TLS course readings service to double-check what is covered.  More details are on the library CLA information page; you can use the CLA ‘check permissions’ search (make sure you opt for the HE licence); and the CLA User Guidelines.

Whilst this is not an audit, the CLA will be aware from the collection data if you are breaching their licence.

 

Does a studypack count?

If you are photocopying a few readings to make up a studypack, then yes!  In fact you can right now submit any study packs online to the CLA Cloud. 

Login Name:    UCL                    Password: (Please email UCL Copyright for the password)

This will remain open until 21st February 2020.

 

Is there anything else we can do to prepare?

You could double-check that your local MFD has an up to date CLA notice poster near it, and that your colleagues are aware of the CLA licence.

 

I’m an author: how do I get paid secondary royalties from the CLA and other collecting societies?!

Salient question.  If you are an author you can join the Authors’ Licensing and Collecting Society (ALCS).  There is a sign-up fee (currently £36) and this fee is deducted from your first royalty cheque.  ALCS also take commission.

 

How do I learn more about the CLA and other licences that UCL holds?

The library also manages the NLA and ERA licences.  Do get in touch for more information on using these in your teaching.

For an overview to using copyright works in teaching or research, the UCL Copyright Support Officer Chris Holland is very happy to visit your department or student class to deliver a quick session or answer questions!

 

 

CLA licence update

Hazel M Ingrey10 December 2019

CLA logoThe Copyright Licensing Agency (CLA) Higher Education licence enables staff at UCL to digitise or photocopy readings for teaching purposes.

It does not cover all published material, so there are some limits to be aware of. Full details of these limits and how the TLS team checks your readings can be found on the Course Readings webpage.

Every three years the licence is re-negotiated with the help of the UUK and Guild HE Copyright Negotiation and Advisory Committee (CNAC).  The new licence period is 2019-22 and in this round there were no major changes.  One new benefit has been that negotiations with RROs in Germany, Belgium and the Netherlands resulted in these country’s materials being brought into the scanning repertoire.  Another new, useful feature is that CLA copies may be made for administrative purposes that are not readings on a named module, for example UCL staff training other UCL staff.  These copies must still adhere to the usual limits but don’t need to be reported.

The licence also allows some photocopying of readings with similar limits to digitising.  Photocopying data is not collected and reported; instead UCL is subject to occasional photocopying data collection surveys.

At UCL the administration of the CLA licence is handled by the library.  The TLS team copyright checks readings to ensure they fall under the CLA licence terms, before processing PDFs or photocopies into a copyright compliant scan, which is recorded and reported to the CLA annually. To take advantage of this service please look at the Course Readings webpage.   If readings aren’t recorded through the library they are not covered by the CLA licence.

In the year 2018-19 UCL reported in excess of 6,500 digitised readings, which were delivered to students through the relevant module’s online reading list.

There is already a great deal of high quality digitised material available, from e-books and e-journals to Open Access articles in UCL’s institutional respository and UCL Press, which mean that you can sidestep copying issues altogether. Linking to a resource in an online reading list using ReadingLists@UCL will give easy access for your students, whilst avoiding headaches about licensing for you.  You don’t need a licence or permission to link to legitimate or subscribed resources.

For more information please don’t hesitate to get in touch with the TLS team!

Copy up to 10% with the new CLA licence!

Hazel M Ingrey28 July 2016

CLA logo

 

UCL, like many universities, owns a CLA (Copyright Licensing Agency) licence, which allows readings to be digitised for taught courses, where they meet certain conditions.

The licence has just been re-negotiated with representatives from the HE community, resulting in some beneficial changes.  From August 1st the amount that can be digitised will increase, rising to 10% or 1 chapter / 1 article (whichever is greater) of a text.  The CLA issued a press release with an update on the new licence agreement for HE institutions.

In order to take advantage of the CLA licence and digitise readings for your teaching, other conditions must be met, including a requirement to report which readings have been used. UCL submitted its annual report in June 2016 and around 3400+ thousand readings were reported, which were used on taught courses across UCL this academic year.

To remove the burden from academic departments, and ensure the CLA conditions are met, UCL library manages a course readings service. The Teaching & Learning Services (TLS) team copyright check readings, digitise and upload them in the required format and security level, and also maintain records for reporting.  See the full low-down plus how to submit readings for digitising.

Please note, if your digitised readings do not pass through this service, then they are not covered by the CLA licence.

There is already a great deal of high quality digitised material available, from e-books and e-journals to Open Access articles in UCL’s institutional respository and UCL Press, which mean that you can sidestep copying issues altogether. Linking to a resource in an online reading list using ReadingLists@UCL will give easy access for your students, whilst avoiding headaches about licensing for you.  You don’t need a licence or permission to link to legitimate or subscribed resources.

For more information please don’t hesitate to get in touch with the TLS: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/library/teaching-support

 

A Different Educational Exception

ucylcjh16 July 2014

Having blogged about the fair dealing exception for copying for the purposes of instruction (updated Section 32 of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988), it may seem confusing to introduce yet another exception for “Copying of extracts by educational establishments”, but there it is, the revised CDPA, Section 36. The distinctive features are:

  • No fair dealing test, defined limits instead, namely a maximum of 5% of a given work in any 12 months period for each institution.
  • Must be for instruction “for a non-commercial purpose”
  • Can only be used when there is no licence available to cover our use of the work in question.

Particular advantages:

  • We are explicitly permitted to upload the extracts onto a VLE (such as Moodle) by this exception, including remote access for UCL students not on the premises.
  • Covers any copyright work apart from broadcasts and stand-alone artistic works (such as photographs and paintings)
  • Offers an opening to use a work which is not covered by a licence. Examples would be a book which is excluded from the CLA licence by the publisher or an extract from any film, since there is currently no blanket licence available which would cover that usage.

This is an exception to be used with caution. In particular there may be difficulties in monitoring the limitation of 5% of a work in any 12 month period. In specific circumstances however it could prove very useful.  Extracts would be best added to an online reading list, using the Library’s Course readings service.