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My Name is Leon, Kit de Waal

By Helena McNish, on 4 May 2017

Longlisted for the Desmond Elliot Prize 2017

Kit de Waal’s enchanting debut novel My Name is Leon has been longlisted for the Desmond Elliott prize. This achievement is well deserved as, from the first chapter, I was engrossed in the observant perspective of eight year old Leon. His narrative voice evokes the innocence of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime, allowing the sensitive issues of racism, the 1981 riots sparked by police brutality and the Irish republican hunger strikes, to be presented in a sensitive, thought-provoking way, adding additional layers of complexity to the story.

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Golden Hill, Francis Spufford

By Helena McNish, on 4 May 2017

Longlisted for the Desmond Elliot Prize 2017

Golden Hill, longlisted for the Desmond Elliott Prize, is the debut fiction title written by Francis Spufford, acclaimed for his non-fiction publications. Set in 1746 New York, Spufford writes in the style of the time, which adds elegance and authenticity to the text, allowing the reader to more easily immerse themselves in the 18th century. I must say that, before Golden Hill, I read My Name is Leon, a simple story written from the perspective of a child. Therefore, it was a shock to begin Spufford’s novel and navigate through the complex description and dialogue. This extreme contrast between styles meant I struggled through the first dozen pages, but then quickly acclimated and lost myself in the beautifully illustrative prose. I particularly appreciated Spufford’s decision to break the fourth wall several times. The narrator humorously apologises for their inability to describe events such as a piquet game, creating welcome comical interludes in the tense scenes.

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Montpelier Parade, Karl Geary

By Helena McNish, on 4 May 2017

Longlisted for the Desmond Elliot Prize 2017

Karl Geary’s debut novel is a bittersweet tale of love and hardship. Geary delicately explores the divisions between young and old, working-class and well-off, and, heartbreakingly, the division between dreams and reality that further widens as the novel progresses.

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Forbidden Line, Paul Stanbridge

By Helena McNish, on 4 May 2017

Longlisted for the Desmond Elliot Prize 2017

Interested in what I was reading, a friend asked me to summarise this book as simply as I could in one sentence. I struggled with this request. I enjoyed this novel for many reasons; it was difficult to condense everything I wanted to say in one line, and I found myself stupidly answering, “It’s just about two guys who wander around Essex and London.”

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They Are Trying To Break Your Heart, David Savill

By Helena McNish, on 4 May 2017

Longlisted for the Desmond Elliot Prize 2017

The most stunning thing about Savill’s debut, They Are Trying To Break Your Heart, is that it does absolutely. The passion of the author is palpable from the get go; Savill’s narrative follows the tragic events and consequences of two vastly different, but incredibly important international crisis across more than a decade. Although initially, it seems a strange and tenuous link to explore the Bosnian War of the 1990s and the Boxing Day tsunami of 2004 in one novel, Savill manages to tackle both with great sensitivity, vehemence and care.

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