X Close

Anthropology of Smartphones and Smart Ageing Blog

Home

Anthropology of Smartphones and Smart Ageing

Menu

Smartphones in “Dar Al Hawa”, al-Quds (East Jerusalem)

Maya De Vries Kedem3 January 2020

Written by Laila Abed Rabho and Maya de Vries

Please note that the participant names used in this blog post, as well as the neighbourhood name ‘Dar al-Hawa’, have been pseudonymised for reasons of anonymity and confidentiality.

Smartphones are perhaps the most important technological devices used in the world today. In our field site of Dar al-Hawa, a neighbourhood of 10,000 people in al-Quds (East Jerusalem), smartphones are part of everyday life, including among older members of society. As part of our fieldwork, we interviewed 22 women between the ages of 42 and 75 in the area. We discovered that even though many carry mobile devices with them on a regular basis, this does not necessarily mean that they make use of the full functionality of these, including apps and other features.

All interviewees agree that having a smartphone makes communication with their family members (parents, children and grandchildren) easier, whether they are in the country or abroad. Most of them actively use WhatsApp, Facebook and Facebook Messenger to communicate, as well as to send each other prayers and quotes from the Qur’an. Some also browse the Internet and follow daily news. Overall, smartphones are seen as devices that make communication between family members much easier, especially in comparison to their older, pre-smartphone counterparts:

Eman (75), remembers a time when she had to top up her phone to make calls abroad:

“I used to have a card, and I would buy a 100 shekel card every time I topped up. When I called my brother in America or in Jordan, the conversation ended quickly – today I can call him for free. Smartphones have reduced the distance between us.”

Hala (58): “I used to use my phone to check on my daughter at university – she studied outside of Jerusalem.”

Smartphone use among older women in the Arab community is not limited to family communication and calls. Some women we interviewed use their smartphones to find recipes online:

Nisreen (56): “I love to read about cooking and find dessert recipes.”

Kholud (63): “I browse the internet to find recipes that suit my diet. I would also like to read about cooking and how to make dessert recipes.”

None of the women we interviewed use their smartphone to pay bills or do online shopping however. These findings are aligned with recent research reports on the digital divide within Israel, which have shown that there are significant differences between internet adoption and use among the Jewish population and that of the Arab population. Although internet use among the Arab community in Israel had increased to as much as 84% by 2015, there is still a large disparity in terms of the scope and nature of internet (and implicitly, smartphone) use between the two groups. While data shows that as many as 7 in 10 members of the Arab community had not shopped online or made payments on the internet in 2016, for the Jewish community, this figure was only around 30%. Among the Arab community, there are also more significant differences between different generations when it comes to browsing the internet, with over 45s being even more underrepresented and less confident that older internet users in the Jewish population.

Digital access and consequently, digital equality, tend to vary based on the socio-political background of a specific group or individual. In addition, the lack of motivation to use the internet can also occur due to a fear of technology, especially among minorities or more marginalised groups such as older people. Such groups are more likely to suffer from a lack of basic digital skills and knowledge and have limited exposure to the internet. As we have learnt from our informants, joining the digital world and learning how to navigate it are not self-evident processes, and can both take a long time. Even when adults learn how to use the phone and have practised using it multiple times, they may forget how to use it with time, some even forgetting the right way to properly use a touchscreen, for example. Such difficulties can have the effect of severely limiting the way these members of the population will use their phone, limiting their use to voice calls and WhatsApp.

Mayar (46) was very explicit about this: “I am afraid that a time will come when everything will be online. I do not know how to pay in this way. Sometimes when I am in a car park, I am asked to pay for the space online. I am also afraid that a day will come that I cannot find a machine [where I can still pay manually]. That’s why I wish to find a class to teach me how to use the smartphone. Girls in their twenties may know how to pay via the internet, but us women over 45 need education in this field.”

We also asked informants whether they use their smartphone to contact their doctor. Interviewees were keen to stress that they would never use their smartphone to communicate with their doctors in a direct way. There was one exception, Hamda (75), who said:

“Of course, I use it to communicate with my doctor. Today I want to call my doctor because I want to cancel an appointment I have. I want to tell him that I am not coming.”

It is interesting to note however that Hamda uses her smartphone to place a direct call to her doctor as opposed to using the clinic’s app or messaging him via WhatsApp. However, she is quite unique in this matter. Another research participant, Jumana (75) says: “As for communicating with doctors, I do not use it [smartphone]. I go to see the doctor face to face. If I had the clinic’s doctor’s number, I would contact them, but I don’t know how to use WhatsApp.”

The women we spoke to also highlighted the importance of phones among elderly people who were childless, or those whose children were far away and unable to provide them with immediate assistance.

Haya (62) says: “The phone is very good, I like having it with me in the knowledge that I can use it to communicate with my children at any given time. It is better than the house phone. It is very good to be able to use the camera no matter where you are. I sometimes also use YouTube.”

Rana (43) says: “Having a mobile phone is very important for the elderly who live alone today. There is even a service that allows older users to call the police or an ambulance at the touch of a button.”

The evidence from our interviews shows a widespread perception that phones have numerous advantages, assuming of course that informants know how to use their functions and features. The widespread use of smartphones also presents downsides – a fact that appeared as a more subtle implication in our  discussions with informants – something that is related to the specific cultural context of our field site.

For example, Haya (62) talks about the smartphone and the ridiculous things that can happen as a result of using the phone incorrectly:

If you know how to use it {the smartphone}, it is true that there is a lot of good in it. This phone is a blessing from God, but most people do not know how to use it in a good way, so they use it to do bad stuff. This is why some people prefer the old ‘stupid’ phone.”

The community in Dar al Hawa is considered a conservative one. It is not unheard of for some members of this community to use smartphones for abusive purposes that include discrediting or shaming other people.

While smartphones can make life easier, they can also complicate it, carrying the potential to influence the life of individuals (particularly women) and their families in a negative way.

Bearing all this in mind, it was particularly interesting to see in the WhatsApp group of the Elderly Club in “Dar Al Hawa” the following image praising the “stupid” old phone and its lack of capabilities:

It lived with dignity
It died with dignity
Never took a photo of a girl
And did not record any embarrassing situations (scandals)
And it did not carry music

 

الهاتف الذكي في حي دار الهوى، القدس

ليلى عبد ربه ومايا دة-فريس

 

تعتبر الهواتف الذكية من اهم الأجهزة التكنولوجية المستخدمة بكثرة لدى أغلب فئات المجتمع. خلال اللقاءات مع النساء الفلسطينيات في حي “دار الهوى[1] – القدس حول الهاتف الذكي واستخدامه، قالت أغلب النساء ان الهاتف الذكي سهل عليهن التواصل مع الأهل والأبناء سواء كانوا داخل البلد او خارجها.

حتى الآن تم اللقاء مع 22 امرأة بالفئة العمرية ما بين 42 و75 عاماً، جميعهن أكدن على استخدام الهاتف الذكي كوسيلة للاتصال والتواصل. أغلبهن يستعملن تطبيق الواتس اب والفيسبوك والمسنجر كوسائل للتواصل ولإرسال الادعية الدينية، كما يتصفح بعضهن الانترنت لمتابعة الأخبار. أكدت جميع النساء على سهولة استخدام الهاتف الذكي (على عكس الهاتف القديم) للتواصل مع افراد عائلاتهن خارج البلاد و داخلها:

إيمان (75) قالت: “كنت استخدم الكرت (كل مرة اشتري كرت بمئة شيكل) عندما اتصل بأخي في امريكا او في الاردن فينتهي بسرعة, اليوم انا باتصّل ببلاش. هو يقرب البعيد”.

هالة (58) قالت: كنت استخدمه للاطمئنان على بنتي في الجامعة“.

قسم من النساء يستخدمنه لتصفح ما يتعلق بالطبخ والحلويات. نسرين (56) قالت: أنا أحب ان أقرا عن الطبخ وأن استخرج وصفات للحلويات. خلود (63) قالت اتصفح النت لاستخراج وصفات للرجيم وأيضا أحب أن أقرأ عن الطبخ وكيفية عمل بعض الحلويات.

لم تقم أي من النساء اللواتي تم اللقاء معهن بدفع فواتير الهاتف او الكهرباء أو اي فواتير أخرى عن طريق الهاتف الذكي.

اثبتت الدراسات التي تمت حول الهاتف الذكي في إسرائيل الفرق بين المجتمع اليهودي والمجتمع العربي في استخدام الهاتف الذكي والانترنت. حيث وصلت نسبة مستخدمي الانترنت في المجتمع العربي حوالي 60% في عام 2011، مقارنة ب 77% لدى السكان اليهود. أما في عام 2015 فقد ارتفعت هذه النسبة في المجتمع العربي الى 84% (لجنة الاحصاءات المركزية في إسرائيل)، ولكن لا يزال هنالك تفاوت كبير في نطاق وطبيعة الاستخدام بين الشعبين.

اتضح أن أكثر من 70% من مستخدمي الشبكة من المجتمع العربي لا يتسوقون أو يجرون الدفعات بشكل يومي مقارنة مع 30% من المجتمع اليهودي. ظهر أيضاً تفاوت كبير بنسب التصفح بين الاجيال (فوق أو تحت عمر 45) بالمجتمع العربي ولكنهم يستخدمون الشبكات الاجتماعية.[2]

تتنوع التفسيرات بموضوع المساواة الرقمية حسب الخلفية الاثنية بموضوع التكنولوجيا وتبنيها:

أولا، قلة الأجور لذوي الياقات الزرقاء بسبب عدم المساواة الاقتصادية/الاجتماعية/الثقافية/التعليمية والتي من خلالها سيكون الانكشاف للعالم التكنولوجي متدني.

ثانيا، عدم وجود الدافع لاستخدام التكنولوجيا بسبب الخوف من التكنولوجيا من قبل الأقليات، نتيجة لعدم معرفة استخدام المهارات الحاسوبية والانكشاف المقتصر لشبكة الإنترنت.

مع ذلك، وكما يظهر من المقابلات فان الانضمام للعالم التكنولوجي وتعلمه ليس بديهي ويستغرق وقتا طويلا. حتى عندما يتعلم الكبار كيفية استخدام الهاتف عدة مرات، فانه قد ينسى كيفية استخدامه، أو يكون استخدامه محدود جدا (للمكالمات والواتس اب فقط).[3]

رغم هذه الدراسات إلا أن بحثنا يظهر استخدام النساء المسنات للهاتف الذكي في القدس بوضعها السياسي المركب. كما ويؤكد البحث على عدم استخدام النساء للإنترنت بشكل واسع في الهاتف الذكي، بالمقارنة مع استخدامهن للواتساب والفيسبوك.

هالة (58) قالت: “زوجي وابنائي يدفعون الفواتير

ميار (46) ابدت تخوف من هذا الامر: أنا خائفة ان يأتي وقت يصبح فيه كل شيء عن طريق النت وأنا لا أعرف كيف يتم الدفع بهذه الطريقة، احيانا يطلبون مني في موقف السيارات الدفع عن طريق النت. خائفة ايضا ان يأتي يوم لا أجد مصف فيه الدفع عن طريق ماكنة عشان هيك يا ريت حد يقوم بتعليمنا كيف يتم الدفع عن طريق النت. الفتيات في سن العشرين يعرفن كيف يدفعن عن طريق النت لكن نحن النساء فوق الخامسة والاربعين نحتاج لتوعية في هذا المجال.”

إضافة الى ذلك أكدت النساء أيضا على عدم استخدام الهاتف الذكي للتواصل مع الطبيب بشكل مباشر، سوى واحدة، حمدة (75) قالت: طبعا باستخدمه في التواصل مع طبيبي انا اليوم بدي اتصل في طبيبي لأني بدي الغي موعد بكرة بدي اقول له انا مش جاي بكرة.

لم تستخدم أي من النساء الهاتف الذكي للتواصل مع الخدمات الطبية ‘الديجيتال’. جمانة (75) قالت: “أما بالنسبة للتواصل مع الاطباء لا أستخدمه [الهاتف الذكي] فأنا اذهب لرؤية الطبيب وجها لوجه. بالنسبة للتواصل مع الطبيب قالت إذا كان رقم العيادة معي ورقم الدكتور باتواصل معهم بس انا لسا بتعلم على الواتس آب.

زاهرة (74) اذا بدي اشي من الطبيب بقول لنعمة بنتي بتتصلي اذا بدي اشي من المكتب بتصل عليهم كمان ما باستعمل الواتس آب.

كما أكدت اغلب النساء على اهمية الهاتف الذكي ومساعدته للمسنين خاصة المسن الذي ليس لديه أبناء او أن أبناءه بعيدين عنه ويعيش في البيت لوحده.

هيا (62) قالت: استخدم الواتس وباتفرج على الفيس ومرات أتصل على اختي من المسنجر. البيلفون منيح كثير بتطلعي مشوار بكون بلفونك معك بتتواصلي مع اولادك هو احسن من تلفون الدار كثير منيح بتكوني في اي محل وبتفتحي الكاميرا وأحياناً أستخدم اليوتيوب.

رانا (43) قالت: مهم جدا للمسنين الذين يعيشون وحدهم اليوم يوجد خدمة يستطيع المسن ان يضغط على الزر فتأتي الاسعاف او الشرطة.

أظهرت المقابلات أن الهاتف الذكي يتمتع بمزايا كبيرة، على افتراض أنهم يعرفون كيفية استخدام تقنياته. في الوقت ذاته، للهاتف الذكي ايضا يوجد جانب سلبي، والذي لم يظهر بشكل ضمني إلا في المقابلات مع النساء ويعتمد على السياق الثقافي لمجال دراستنا.

فعلى سبيل المثال، تتحدث السيدة هيا (62) عن الهاتف الغبي والأشياء السخيفة التي يمكن أن تحدث نتيجة لاستخدام الهاتف بشكل غير صحيح:

اذا بتعرفي تستخدميه صح بكون كثير منيح مش للهبل هذا البيلفون نعمة من الله, لكن اكثر الناس مش عارفين يستخدموه, بيستعملوه للهبل.”

يعتبر المجتمع ا في “دار الهوى” مجتمع محافظ، ولكن قد يقوم بعض افراد هذا المجتمع باستغلال الهواتف الذكية لأغراض مسيئة تشمل تشويه سمعة أشخاص اخرين. من الجدير بالذكر ان الهاتف الذكي من ناحية يجعل الحياة أسهل ومن ناحية أخرى يعقدها.

في ضوء ذلك، كان من المثير للاهتمام أن نرى في مجموعة الواتس اب التابعة لنادي المسنين في “دار الهوى” الصورة التالية والتي تشيد بالهاتف “الغبي” وافتقاره إلى القدرات:

[1] “دار الهوى” هي اسم مستعار وكذلك أسماء الذين تمت مقابلتهن.

[2] Lev-On, A., Brainin, E., Abu-Kishk, H., Zilberstein, T., Steinfeld, N., Naim, S. (2019) Narrowing the gap: Characterization of participants, short- and long-term effects of participation in LEHAVA program (To narrow the digital gap in Israeli society, in Hebrew).

[3] Gordon, C., Al Zidjaly, N., & Tovares, A. V. (2017). Mobile phones as cultural tools for identity construction among college students in Oman, Ukraine, and the US. Discourse, Context & Media, 17, 9-19.