Archive for the 'Transcription' Category

Progress update, 22 to 28 February 2014

By Tim Causer, on 28 February 2014

Welcome to the progress update for the period 22 to 28 February, during which time volunteers have not just broken the 7,000-transcript barrier, but smashed through it at a rate of knots. 17,888 words of Bentham text have been transcribed during the last seven days, along with a further 7,504 words of TEI-XML.

7,060 manuscripts have now been transcribed or partially-transcribed, which is an increase of 71 on last week’s total. Of these transcripts, 6,734 (95%) are complete and locked after passing our checking process, up 75 since the last progress report.

The more detailed state of progress is as follows:

JB/117/035/003

JB/117/035/003

A number of interesting items were transcribed during the last week. They range from Bentham stating that ‘I live in the ground unknown to every body but the Postman in order to be out of the way of every sort of interruption‘, which presumably allowed him to write so much. Bentham also permitted himself to blow his own trumpet a little in stating that he was ‘A man of responsible circumstances, of unexceptionable character, of liberal education … not altogether unknown in the literary world‘, and who had devoted ‘himself exclusively to the service of mankind’. (thanks to David Kaminski for transcribing those two manuscripts). Elsewhere, Peter Hollis transcribed a letter from Bentham to Sir John Parnell, then Chancellor of the Exchequer in Ireland, describing a potential image for the frontispiece to his panopticon writings as ‘a great gogle eye with rays round it, over the plan of my Panopticon’.

Readers may also be interested in an article written by our colleague Dr Michael Quinn, discussing the recently published latest volume of Bentham’s Collected Works, Of Sexual Irregularities, and Other Writings on Sexual Morality, which was earlier this week made available on The Conversation website.

Thank you, as always, to everyone who has contributed to Transcribe Bentham over the last few days. It is as greatly appreciated as ever.

 

 

 

Progress update, 15 to 21 February 2014

By Tim Causer, on 21 February 2014

Welcome to the progress update for the period 15 to 21 February, during which time superb progress has been made by Transcribe Bentham volunteers. 14,133 words of Bentham text have been transcribed this week, along with a further 5,211 words of TEI XML.

We didn’t quite make it to 7,000 transcripts this week, but came mightily close! 6,991 manuscripts have now been transcribed or partially transcribed, up 65 on last week. Of these transcripts, 6,659 are complete and have been locked, which is an increase of 51 on last week’s total.

The more detailed state of progress is as follows:

As you can see, five of the uploaded boxes have been completed, and boxes 70, 72, 95, 96, 107, and 115 are the others closes to completion. During the last week we have also uploaded a further 1,696 manuscript images: boxes 33 and 36 contain manuscripts pertaining to Bentham’s Constitutional Code, while Box 118 contains more panopticon material, including Bentham’s fruitless attempts to find a site for his penitentiary. We will write more about this new material next week, and more and more images to transcribe will be added in the forthcoming weeks.

Thank you, as always, to everyone who has contributed to Transcribe Bentham during the last seven days, your efforts remain as greatly appreciated as ever.

Progress update, 8 to 14 February 2014

By Tim Causer, on 14 February 2014

Welcome along to the progress update for the period 25 January to 7 February, during which time further steady progress has been made by Transcribe Bentham volunteers. 6,021 words of Bentham text have been transcribed this week, along with a further 2,554 words of TEI XML.

6,924 manuscripts have now been transcribed or partially-transcribed, which is an increase of 34 on this time last week. This means that we are only 76 more transcripts away from having our 7,000th transcript in hand, which is a tremendous achievement on the part of volunteer transcribers. Of these transcripts, 6,608 (95%) have passed our quality-control procedures and have been locked, up 31 on the last progress update.

The more detailed state of progress is as follows:

Elsewhere in the world of Transcribe Bentham, a new article on how discoveries made by volunteer transcribers could help shape future avenues for research is now available for download, and a Handwritten Text Recognition contest, based on data from the tranScriptorium project (and featuring 433 Bentham manuscripts) is to be launched in the next few days.

Thank you, as always, to everyone who has given their time and effort so generously to Transcribe Bentham during the last seven days, it remains as greatly appreciated as ever.

Progress update, 25 January to 7 February 2014

By Tim Causer, on 7 February 2014

Welcome along to the progress update for the period 25 January to 7 February 2014, which has proven quite a busy period. Firstly, many apologies for the delay in checking transcripts last week, and the non-appearance of the progress update last Friday. This was owing to our attendance at a tranScriptorium project meeting in Innsbruck; we look forward to telling you more about this project in the next few months as work progresses. Normal service has now been resumed, and we apologise for any inconvenience which this delay may have caused.

During this two-week period, 16,489 words of Bentham text were transcribed by volunteers, along with an additional 6,690 words of TEI XML. 6,890 manuscripts have now been transcribed or partially-transcribed, which is an increase of 66 since the last progress update. Of these transcripts, 6,577 (95%) are complete and locked after having undergone our quality-control process.

The more detailed state of progress is as follows:

This week we also took receipt of the first batch of digital images from the British Library’s Bentham manuscripts. The BL are digitising the volumes of correspondence first, and this set contains letters to and from Jeremy himself, his father Jeremiah and Mother Alicia, his brother Samuel, step-brother Charles Abbot, and many others besides. They feature a letter from Jeremiah Bentham to the headmaster of Westminster School, complaining that some of the older boys had divested young Jeremy of his books, and Jeremy’s translation into English from the Latin Cicero’s Tusculan Disputations. This material will be uploaded to the website in due course, and we look forward to exploring it further with you.

Thank you, as always, to everyone who has given their time and effort to Transcribe Bentham during the last two weeks. It remains as greatly appreciated by us as ever.

Progress update, 11 to 17 January 2014, and a new publication

By Tim Causer, on 17 January 2014

Welcome along to the progress update for the period 11 to 17 January 2014, during which time further steady progress has been made by Transcribe Bentham volunteers. 9,859 words were transcribed this week, along with a further 3,603 words of TEI XML.

6,789 manuscripts have now been transcribed or partially-transcribed, which is an increase of 29 on last week’s total. Of these transcripts, 6,492 (95%) are complete and have been locked after being checked by TB staff; this is also up 29 on this time last week.

The more detailed state of progress is as follows:

Elsewhere, readers might be interested in the Bentham Project’s latest publication, the Memorandoms of convict James Martin, the manuscript for which is part of Box 169 of UCL’s Bentham Papers. The Memorandoms is the only first-hand account of perhaps the most famous escape of transported convicts from Australia: on the evening of 28 March 1791, Martin, in company with eight other prisoners (including William and Mary Bryant, and their two children), stole the governor of New South Wales’s six-oared cutter. In it, they navigated the eastern and northern coasts of Australia, encountered several Aboriginal peoples, and were fortunate to survive several ferocious storms. After a journey of just over two months, they reached Kupang, West Timor, where they successfully (for a while) passed themselves off as survivors of a shipwreck. This journey of over 5,000 miles in an open boat was an astonishing feat of seamanship and endurance.

This is the first time such a detailed, annotated edition of the Memorandoms has been published, and it has never been so widely available. The document, along with an introduction by Dr Tim Causer of the Bentham Project, is now freely available to read online, or can be downloaded as a PDF. We hope you find it of some interest.

Thank you, as always, to everyone who has contributed their time to Transcribe Bentham during the last week. It remains greatly appreciated by us all.