Progress update, 28 June to 4 July 2014

By Tim Causer, on 4 July 2014

Welcome along to the progress update for the period 28 June to 4 July, during which time TB volunteers have continued to make phenomenal progress.

9,674 manuscripts have now been transcribed or partially-transcribed, which is an increase of 119 on last week’s total. Of these transcripts, 8,895 (92%)are now complete and have been approved, up 256 on this time last week. We continue to close in on the 10,000th edited transcript, and are continuing to thin down the backlog of submitted transcripts – thanks again to all volunteers for bearing with us while we work through them.
The more detailed state of progress is as follows:

Box No. of manuscripts worked on No. of manuscripts in box Completion
Box 1 126 794 15%
Box 2 465 753 61%
Box 5 167 290 57%
Box 15 53 914 6%
Box 18 2 192 1%
Box 27 350 350 100%
Box 29 12 122 9%
Box 31 11 302 3%
Box 34 29 398 7%
Box 35 286 439 65%
Box 36 21 418 2%
Box 37 16 487 3%
Box 38 47 424 11%
Box 39 8 282 2%
Box 41 77 528 13%
Box 42 69 910 7%
Box 44 52 201 25%
Box 50 159 198 79%
Box 51 373 940 39%
Box 57 13 420 3%
Box 62 55 565 9%
Box 70 298 350 85%
Box 71 663 663 100%
Box 72 613 664 92%
Box 73 151 151 100%
Box 79 199 199 100%
Box 95 123 147 83%
Box 96 537 539 99%
Box 97 113 296 38%
Box 98 218 499 43%
Box 100 188 422 42%
Box 107 481 538 89%
Box 115 276 307 89%
Box 116 499 864 57%
Box 117 329 853 38%
Box 118 204 880 23%
Box 119 321 990 23%
Box 121 129 526 23%
Box 122 289 717 39%
Box 139 40 40 100%
Box 150 163 972 16%
Box 169 170 728 23%
Add MSS 537 546 744 73%
Add MSS 538 327 858 38%
Add MSS 539 386 948 40%
Add MSS 541 20 1258 1%
Overall 9,674 25,139 40%

This week, another batch of the British Library’s Bentham manuscripts were uploaded to the Transcription Desk, this time containing Bentham family correspondence for the period 1789 to 1794.  This time was dominated by the start of Bentham’s attempts to have his panopticon prison built, though elsewhere he wrote about the events of the French Revolution, and produced perhaps his most well-known work, An Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation. You can read a fuller description of this material, and access the other available British Library manuscripts as well. Another batch will follow shortly, which will feature Jeremy’s long and dangerous journey to Russia to visit his brother, Samuel. (Thanks to our colleagues at the Digital Archives group of the University of London Computer Centre for getting this material uploaded). We hope that you enjoy exploring these manuscripts!

Thank you, as always, to everyone who has given their time so generously to TB during the past week. It remains as greatly appreciated as always.