Progress update, 10 to 16 August

By Tim Causer, on 16 August 2013

Welcome to the Transcribe Bentham progress update for the period 10 to 16 August, during which time further good progress has been made by volunteer transcribers. 6,344 words of Bentham text were transcribed during the past seven days, along with a further 2,717 words of TEI XML.

5,917 manuscripts have now been transcribed or partially-transcribed, which is 26 up on last week’s total. Of these transcripts, 5,631 have been accepted and are locked, which is an increase of 25 on this time last week.

The more detailed state of progress is as follows:

Regular transcribers may have noticed a few niggles with the upgraded Transcription Desk: for example, the link from the user page to your talk board is currently not available, and nor are points and ranks showing up on the user pages at the moment. As a result, we haven’t been able to update the leaderboard for a few weeks. But please do rest assured that your points are being tallied, and that these problems are being worked upon and will soon be ironed out. If you come across any further problems, then do contact us and we can look into them.

The new Transcription Desk also allows you to gain detailed feedback on your submitted transcripts. If you wish to see what changes have been made to your transcripts after checking by Transcribe Bentham staff, then please do consult our guide on how to do so.

Panopticon exhibition poster

Panopticon exhibition poster

Finally, the Panopticon: Experimental Tales of Jeremy Bentham exhibition, co-ordinated by the Design with Heritage team, opened here at UCL yesterday evening.We are delighted to say that the exhibition showcases the work of Transcribe Bentham volunteers, and displays many of the manuscripts which they have transcribed and explore.

The exhibition displays ‘facsimile manuscripts from UCL Special Collections … enhanced by projected images and text, weaving a different tale for each visitor’. It’s an excellent presentation, open 1 to 5pm, Monday to Saturday, until 5 September, and we highly recommend entering the very atmospheric venue to find out more about Bentham’s life and work.

What with the Panopticon exhibition, and the Bentham manuscripts and transcripts on display in UCL’s Octagon Gallery, the work of volunteer transcribers has never been better publicised. We do, however, hope to reach an even wider audience in the next few weeks. All we can say at the moment is: who would have guessed that tripe could taste so good?

Thank you, as always, to everyone who had so generously donated their time to Transcribe Bentham during the last seven days. It remains very much appreciated by us all.