Welcome to Transcribe Bentham

By Tim Causer, on 27 March 2013

Jeremy Bentham

Jeremy Bentham

‘Many hands make light work. Many hands together make merry work‘, wrote the philosopher and reformer, Jeremy Bentham (1748 – 1832) in 1793.

In this spirit, we cordially welcome you to Transcribe Bentham, a double award-winning collaborative transcription initiative, which is digitising and making available digital images of Bentham’s unpublished manuscripts through a platform known as the ‘Transcription Desk‘. There, you can access the material and—just as importantly—transcribe the material, to help the work of UCL’s Bentham Project, and further improve access to, and searchability of, this enormously important collection of historical and philosophical material.

This is an exciting opportunity to make a genuine difference to research and scholarship by contributing to the production of the new edition of The Collected Works of Jeremy Bentham, and to help create for posterity a vast digital repository of Bentham’s writings.

We warmly invite you to take part in this endeavour: no special skills are required, you do not require approval to participate, and every contribution—no matter how small—is of great value to Transcribe Bentham.

Please consult the Transcribe Bentham FAQ for more details on taking part.

You can also read more about Jeremy Bentham, his thought and his importance, and consult resources on deciphering historical handwriting.

Find out more about the team behind Transcribe Bentham, and some of our talks and publications.

Transcribe Bentham is also now part of the EU-funded Recognition and Enrichment of Archival Documents (READ) project.  The READ project is focused on making archival material more accessible through the development of Handwritten Text Recognition technology.  We are in the process of teaching a computer to help us decipher Bentham’s handwriting!

Transcription Update – 16 September to 13 October 2017

By Louise Seaward, on 13 October 2017

Hello!  We’re here with some amazing news for this month’s statistics update.  Volunteers have now transcribed more than 19,000 pages on our site – a phenomenal effort for which we are hugely grateful.  We look forward to the next big milestone – 20,000 pages, the transcribers are coming for you!

We’re attending a conference about crowdsourcing at the University of Angers next week. We’ll be speaking about the results of our latest user survey and suggesting how we hope to use this feedback to make Transcribe Bentham more enjoyable and efficient for users.  Look out for a report in our next blog post!

Back to the statistics – these are the latest statistics as of 13 October 2017.

19,136 manuscript pages have now been transcribed or partially-transcribed.  Of these transcripts, 18,327 (95%) have been checked and approved by TB staff.

Over the past four weeks, volunteers have worked on a total of 180 manuscript pages.  This means that an average of 45 pages have been transcribed each week during the past month.

Check out the Benthamometer for more information on how much has been transcribed from each box of Bentham’s papers!

Transcription Update – 19 August to 15 September 2017

By Louise Seaward, on 25 September 2017

Hi everyone! We’re here with a quick update on the latest statistics to showcase the hard work that our transcribers have put in over the past month.  We continue to be amazed by the efforts of our volunteers and we owe them an enormous thanks!

These are the latest statistics as of 15 September 2017.

18,956 manuscript pages have now been transcribed or partially-transcribed.  Of these transcripts, 18,027 (95%) have been checked and approved by TB staff.

Over the past four weeks, volunteers have worked on a total of 181 manuscript pages.  This means that an average of 45 pages have been transcribed each week during the past month.

Check out the Benthamometer for more information on how much has been transcribed from each box of Bentham’s papers!

Project update – new material to transcribe! Bentham on Penal Code and Radicalism

By Louise Seaward, on 8 September 2017

Good afternoon and welcome back to the blog.  Transcribe Bentham is hitting a big milestone today – it’s our 7th birthday!  We first launched the website as a six-month experiment on 8 September 2010 and here we are all these years later.  If our volunteers keep transcribing at their current rate, we may hit 20,000 transcripts by the end of 2017.  What a huge achievement and a massive amount of groundwork for future Bentham scholarship. Our most sincere thanks go to everyone who has participated over the years.

We’re here with a nice birthday present for our transcribers – some new material from the Bentham collection!  Boxes 67, 68 and 137 have just been uploaded to the Transcription Desk.  This means that we now have 85 boxes and more than 42,000 pages of Bentham’s available online.

These new boxes contain Bentham’s writings on a penal or criminal code and drafts of a short work called Radicalism not dangerous.

Bentham strongly believed in the importance of clear legal codes and returned to this subject throughout his life.  His penal or criminal code would form one part of his intended pannomion, a complete body of utilitarian law.

Radicalism not Dangerous was a short tract written around 1819-20 in which Bentham put forward his own brand of liberal radicalism.  By this point, he was committed to the cause of political reform but felt that change should be slower and more linked to existing institutions than that which was desired by popular radicals of the early nineteenth century.

137_229_001

UCL Special Collections, Bentham Papers, box cxxxvii, fo. 229, Radicalism not dangerous, 9 April 1820 [Image courtesy of UCL Special Collections]

More information on the contents of each of these boxes and access to the manuscripts can be found on the following pages:

Box 67- penal code

Box 68 – penal code

Box 137 – Radicalism not dangerous

Users can also view pages from these boxes through the Untranscribed Manuscripts page.

We invite anyone to rifle through this new material – and we look forward to seeing what interesting bits and pieces might be uncovered!

Our thanks go to Chris Riley, a PhD student at the Bentham Project, who helped to research the content of these boxes.

Project update – join us at the Bentham Hackathon with IBM

By Louise Seaward, on 23 August 2017

We’re here with news of an exciting event which will take place in October 2017.  UCL have teamed up with the technology company IBM to organise a ‘Bentham Hackathon‘, where participants can work together to explore how digital tools can help us to research Bentham’s philosophy.

For anyone unfamilar with the term, a hackathon is portmanteau of the words ‘hack’ and ‘marathon’.  It originally referred to an intensive meeting where groups of computer developers collaborated on software projects.  The meaning of a hackathon has now expanded and is often applied to cultural or educational events with a technical element, which are designed to generate new ideas and collaborations.  For more on hackathons, have a look at Wikipedia or the useful ‘How to Guide for hackathons in the cultural sector’ produced by the Europeana Space project.

The Bentham Hackathon will take place over the weekend of 20-22 October 2017 at UCL BaseKX.  The Bentham Project, in association with UCL Centre for Digital Humanities and UCL Innovation and Enterprise, will be working with IBM to explore the following question:

How can digital technologies help us to research Bentham’s philosophy?

 

The Bentham Hackathon is an intriguing opportunity for participants to play around with thousands upon thousands of images, transcripts and texts of Bentham’s writings, many of which have been produced in the course of the Transcribe Bentham crowdsourcing initiative.  Let’s see how these amazing resources can be explored and analysed with IBM’s cutting-edge technologies!

We have set four suggested challenges for participants in the Hackathon to work on – although other ideas may emerge in the course of the event.

  1. How can we use keyword searching to explore Bentham’s writings?
  2. Can we use technology to decipher Bentham’s difficult handwriting?
  3. Can we build a user-friendly interface for navigating and transcribing documents?
  4. Can we build a more user-friendly version of the Transcribe Bentham crowdsourcing platform?

Anyone interested in these questions is very welcome to join us at the Bentham Hackathon.  The Hackathon is a free event and there are no pre-requisites for participation.

For technical types, this is a great chance to work with IBM and learn new skills.  Those interested in history, philosophy and Bentham can also give their input to help ensure that digital tools work to enhance learning and research in the humanities. Any Transcribe Bentham volunteers who are close to London might also find the event interesting – your knowledge of Bentham and the process of transcription would be invaluable!

The Hackathon will last for the weekend, starting with an evening presentation on Friday 20 October.  Catering will be provided and participants can get involved in the whole weekend, or just pop in for a while.

The Bentham Hackathon will help us to showcase Bentham’s enormous contribution to philosophical thought, including the way in which his ideas on education inspired the founders of UCL.  And we are hopeful that the innovations developed over the course of this weekend will suggest some new ways to use digital technologies in humanities research.

For more information, check out the Bentham Hackathon webpage or contact us.

Transcription Update – 22 July to 18 August 2017

By Louise Seaward, on 21 August 2017

Hello one and all!  Welcome to our update on the latest transcription figures.  The volunteers have been racing ahead, transcribing close to 50 pages over the past month – which is very impressive!  We need to take this opportunity to thank all of our dedicated volunteers for their hard work.

These are the latest statistics as of 18 August 2017.

18,775 manuscript pages have now been transcribed or partially-transcribed.  Of these transcripts, 17,774 (94%) have been checked and approved by TB staff.

Over the past four weeks, volunteers have worked on a total of 189 manuscript pages.  This means that an average of 47 pages have been transcribed each week during the past month.

The more detailed progress chart is as follows:

Box No. of manuscripts worked on No. of manuscripts in box Completion
Box 1 769 794 96%
Box 2 729 753 96%
Box 3 0 724 0%
Box 4 50 694 7%
Box 5 201 290 69%
Box 6 2 246 1%
Box 7 6 165 3%
Box 8 24 284 8%
Box 9 56 265 21%
Box 10 116 456 25%
Box 11 24 480 5%
Box 12 179 615 29%
Box 13 23 359 6%
Box 14 275 510 53%
Box 15 86 814 10%
Box 16 12 254 4%
Box 18 67 192 34%
Box 23 1 256 1%
Box 26 193 374 51%
Box 27 350 350 COMPLETE
Box 29 22 122 18%
Box 30 5 193 2%
Box 31 21 302 6%
Box 32 10 158 6%
Box 34 41 398 10%
Box 35 287 439 65%
Box 36 38 418 9%
Box 37 37 487 7%
Box 38 238 424 56%
Box 39 12 282 4%
Box 41 88 572 15%
Box 42 118 910 12%
Box 44 53 201 26%
Box 47 1 466 1%
Box 50 180 198 90%
Box 51 388 939 41%
Box 52 7 609 1%
Box 54 0 205 0%
Box 57 20 420 4%
Box 60 3 183 1%
Box 62 78 564 13%
Box 63 157 345 45%
Box 67 0 407 0%
Box 68 0 414 0%
Box 70 308 347 88%
Box 71 663 663 COMPLETE
Box 72 614 664 92%
Box 73 151 151 COMPLETE
Box 75 4 77 5%
Box 79 199 199 COMPLETE
Box 81 4  488 1%
Box 87 13 604 2%
Box 95 126 147 85%
Box 96 534 539 99%
Box 97 151 295 51%
Box 98 225 499 45%
Box 100 214 429 49%
Box 104 3 502 1%
Box 106 236 581 40%
Box 107 523 542 96%
Box 110 15 671 2%
Box 115 277 307 90%
Box 116 795 865 91%
Box 117 511 853 59%
Box 118 278 880 31%
Box 119 645 990 65%
Box 120 685 685 COMPLETE
Box 121 150 529 28%
Box 122 309 728 42%
Box 123 45 437 10%
Box 124 20 382 5%
Box 135 103 571 18%
Box 137 1 499 1%
Box 139 40 579 6%
Box 141 95 380 25%
Box 149 88 581 15%
Box 150 972 972 COMPLETE
Box 169 248 728 34%
Add MS 35537 735 744 98%
Add MS 35538 824 858 96%
Add MS 35539 883 947 93%
Add MS 35540 947 1012 93%
Add MS 35541 999 1258 79%
Add MS 35547 35 701 4%
Add MS 35549 24 364 6%
Add MS 35550 115 637 18%
Overall 18,775 43,416 43%