Research IT & Data Management drop-ins: 2017-18 dates (term 1)

By Myriam Fellous-Sigrist, on 18 July 2017

The Research Data Management and Research IT teams will run more regular drop-in sessions in 2017-18. These sessions are open to all research staff and research students and will be attended by someone from the Research Data Management team as well as representatives from all of the RITS service areas; if you have any questions or problems related the following areas, you should find someone there who can help:

  • research programming
  • workflow automation
  • finding tools and services for your research programmes
  • high performance computing
  • handling large datasets
  • handling sensitive data
  • data storage
  • Research Data Management (including Data Management Plans).

There’s no need to book, but we can make sure there’ll be someone there to help with your problem if you email rits@ucl.ac.uk ideally two days before the session.

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DMPOnline for UCL researchers: a tool to help write your Data Management Plan

By Daniel Van Strien, on 3 July 2017

Data Management Plans have become a requirement for a growing number of research funders. Knowing what to include in a plan can be a challenge for researchers. DMPOnline is a tool which helps researchers develop Data Management Plans by providing templates alongside guidance for each section of the plan. DMPOnline allows you to share your plan with collaborators, export to a variety of different formats and follow templates for the major funders.

Recently the Research Data Management team in UCL Library Services has developed a customised version of DMPOnline. This customised guidance aims to provide UCL researchers with information on local support, infrastructure and services available at UCL.

You can begin using the UCL customised version of DMPOnline by signing in or creating a new account on DMPOnline and choosing UCL as your organisation.  DMPOnline is easy to use but we have also developed additional instructions. We are still in the process of developing the guidance on DMPOnline, if you have any comments please email lib-researchsupport@ucl.ac.uk. 

If you would like further support on developing a plan or would like us to review a draft of the plan please send us an email: lib-researchsupport@ucl.ac.uk. Please try and allow at least two weeks before submission of an application for us to review draft plans.

How will the changes in Data Protection legislation affect my research project?

By Myriam Fellous-Sigrist, on 21 June 2017

The new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) comes into effect in May 2018. It will replace the current Directive and apply to all EU member states without the need for national legislation. The implementation will require comprehensive changes to the way in which organisations, like UCL, collect, use and transfer personal data.

Please see the UCL Data Protection Office’s guidance on the impact of the GDPR on how researchers will seek consent, on privacy notices, data breaches and more.

 

What should I know about transferring personal data to the U.S. and the new Privacy Shield agreement?

By Myriam Fellous-Sigrist, on 21 June 2017

Privacy Shield Fact SheetFollowing the agreement between the European Commission and United States in 2016, the ‘EU-US Privacy Shield’ is now in force and is therefore the main means of allowing personal data to be transferred to the US.

The EU-US Privacy Shield replaces the invalidated Safe Harbour agreement whilst providing additional obligations to protect personal data, as well as establishing annual monitoring and reporting.

Any new agreement to transfer personal data (including transient transfer) can only be done if the US recipient (this includes universities) has signed up to the Privacy Shield Framework.

Researchers planning on transferring data to the US to a recipient that has not signed up to the Privacy Shield Framework, or who are already working under an existing Safe Harbour agreement, should contact the UCL Data Protection Office (data-protection@ucl.ac.uk).

Further information about the EU-US Privacy Shield can be found on the UCL Data Protection webpages.

Research Programming – next Technical Social event: 24/05, 4.30pm

By Myriam Fellous-Sigrist, on 17 May 2017

UCL Research IT Services (RITS) organise regular informal events where you can learn about useful tools and techniques which will help with your research while meeting other students and staff who use computers for science. Each event features a short talk followed by informal discussion over pizza and drinks.

RITSThe next Research Programming Technical Social event will take place on the 24th of May and will focus on Fortran, the dominant programming language of computational science. Find more information and how to register.

The previous presentations of these monthly events are available on the website of the UCL Research Programming Hub.

Save the date: UCL Research Staff Conference, 20/06

By Myriam Fellous-Sigrist, on 27 April 2017

The UCL Organisational Development team has announced the next date and theme of the 2017 Research Staff Conference. It will take place on Tuesday 20th June 2017 (9am-5pm) and will focus on “Transitions in Careers”.

The team is also offering a large range of development opportunities through its Research Staff Development Programme with already more than 30 courses scheduled until July. Programme and booking information are available.

Finally don’t forget to bookmark the UCL Research Staff Hub website, where you will find information about: UCLResearchStaffHub

  • essential support services,
  • training opportunities,
  • research networks,
  • induction for new starters.

 

New date! Introduction to Research Support & Integrity: 02/05

By Myriam Fellous-Sigrist, on 21 March 2017

SignpostsThis regular training course introduces PhD students to research support available during the course of their studies.

It is relevant for all PhD students, whatever the stage reached in their project and is applicable to all disciplines.

Each half-day session focuses on Research Integrity, Research Data Management, Data Protection, Research Ethics, Open Access and Research IT. It highlights good practices in these areas, as well as explain the expectations of researchers.

The last session of the academic year will be held on Tuesday 2nd of May (10am-1pm). More dates will be available in the next academic year.

Booking information is available on the Doctoral Skills Development Programme website.

Digital Skills courses & drop-ins: new dates

By Myriam Fellous-Sigrist, on 28 February 2017

KeyBoards22Students and staff can book courses in March to develop their skills in a wide range of topics, including bibliographic software, data analysis, databases, graphic applications, SharePoint, UNIX, spreadsheets and more.

Drop-ins are also available on Tuesdays and Wednesdays.

Find more information about dates, locations and how to book the courses.

What is a DOI?

By Daniel Van Strien, on 17 February 2017

What is a DOI?

DOI stands for ‘Digital Object Identifier’. A DOI is an alphanumeric string assigned to an object which allows for an object to be identified over time. Often a DOI will be presented as a link which looks like: https://doi.org/10.1109/5.771073. A DOI will always point (link) to the current location for an object. A DOI is similar to a URL but unlike a URL a DOI will take you to the correct object even if the object is moved.

Why should I use a DOI?

A DOI is useful for citing your data in journal articles and other publications, it makes it easier for other people to cite your data and makes your data more discoverable. Most of us have had experience of following a link on a website to arrive on a 404 landing page. A DOI aims to avoid this happening with your research data. The use of a DOI or another persistent identifier is often a requirement of research funder policies on sharing underlying data.

Should I use DOI or another identifier for my data?

A DOI provides a persistent identifier for your data and has become a widespread standard. There are other identifiers available which some repositories may use instead. If you are depositing in a reputable repository then you should be given some type of persistent identifier which you can use to cite and link to your data.

It is also important to note that whilst a DOI provides a persistent identifier for your data it is also important that you assign metadata to your data too. This metadata will help others to understand the data you have shared and also make it easier for people to discover data which might be useful for their research.

How do I get a DOI for my data?

Most repositories will assign a DOI to your uploaded data. UCL Discovery and Digital Collections will both mint DOIs for any data shared in these repositories. Other established repositories will provide you with a DOI for your data once it has been uploaded. Once you have a DOI you can use it to cite your underlying data in publications, on the web and to more easily share your data with other researchers.

Introduction to Research Support @ UCL – courses for all PhD students: 01/03 and 28/03

By Myriam Fellous-Sigrist, on 1 February 2017

UCLQuadThis new regular training course is running to introduce PhD students to research support available during the course of their studies.

It is relevant for all PhD students, whatever the stage reached in their project and is applicable to all disciplines.

The half-day session will focus on Research Integrity, Research Data Management, Data Protection, Research Ethics, Open Access and Research IT. It will highlight good practices in these areas, as well as explain the expectations of researchers.

The next dates are

  • Wednesday 1st March, 2-5pm
  • Tuesday 28th March, 10am-1pm

More dates will be available in the next term. Booking information is available on the Doctoral Skills Development Programme website.