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Doctoral theses in UCL’s repository

Patrycja ABarczynska25 October 2018

At UCL, candidates for research degrees are required to deposit an electronic copy of their final thesis in UCL’s Research Publications Service (RPS), to be made open access in UCL’s institutional repository, UCL Discovery. Students can choose to restric public access to their thesis, for a variety of reasons like future publication, copyright restriction or sensitive data, but most are made open access immediately, or after a delay period no longer than 12 months.

The requirement to submit an electronic copy of your thesis as a condition of award has been in place at UCL since 2009. In addition to that, we have retrospectively digitised theses from earlier years, as a part of a collaborative project with ProQuest. So far, about 3,500 theses have been made available in UCL Discovery as a part of this collaboration. Theses are also digitised through the British Library’s e-Theses Online Service (EThOS), upon request.

In total, there are over 10,500 theses available in UCL’s institutional repository, dating as far back as 1933. UCL theses are amongst our most-downloaded items! The most popular is a 1990 thesis, Marketing theories and concepts for the international construction industry, available here. Amongst the theses available there are some completed by notable UCL alumni:

Julian Baggini, philosopher and author of popular books on philosophy, including A Short History of Truth, The Pig that Wants to be Eaten and 99 other thought experiments, and most recently How the World Thinks. Baggini completed his PhD in 1996, and his thesis on philopsphy of idnetity was recently made available here: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/10057733/

Adam Rutherford, geneticist and author, has produced several science documentaries, and hosts the BBC 4 radio programme Inside Science. He completed his PhD at UCL in 2002, and his thesis on the role of a specific gene (CHX10) on eye development was recently made available in UCL Discovery: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/10057801/

Chris Van Tulleken, together with his twin brother and fellow doctor Xand, makes programmes on various aspects of health, most recently Operation Ouch for CBBC. He is also an infectious diseases doctor and MRC Clinical Research Fellow at University College London Hospital, and completed his PhD in 2017. Chris’ thesis is available here: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1567969/

UCL Discovery success stories – part 3

Patrycja ABarczynska27 October 2017

This year’s Open Access week runs from 23-29 October under the theme “Open in order to…” This is an invitation to reflect on many benefits of making research publications openly available. We are excited to present a series of blog posts demonstrating the benefits of making publications open access via UCL Discovery.

Access to research outside universities is often very restricted. Open access extends the audience for research – to academics without subscriptions (including in developing countries), professionals, businesses, civil servants, politicians in local and national government, doctors and patients, teachers and schoolchildren, amateur scholars and other interested laypeople.

UCL Discovery is a long established repository and authors depositing their papers in there benefit from increased visibility of their work. Articles available there are downloaded hundreds of times in many countries across the globe. Today, in the last post in the series, we present some of the highly-downloaded papers from three faculties in UCL’s School of Life and Medical Sciences.

Publication title: Attachment and Personality Disorders: A Short Review
UCL authors: Peter Fonagy, Nicolas Lorenzini
Publication type: Journal article
Journal title: FOCUS: The Journal of Lifelong Learning in Psychiatry
Publication year: 2013
Discovery URL: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1430370/
Downloads since deposit: 4,487
Downloads last 12 months: 3,033

This paper examines the relationship between attachment and personality disorders. The final accepted manuscript was made available in May 2014, after the delay period required by the journal.

This is a highly popular paper, and the article downloads are increasing, with rarely being below 100 per month and reaching peak of 668 downloads in July this year. With almost 3,000 downloads it became one the 50 most-downloaded items in last 12 months. During this period the manuscript was downloaded in 97 countries, and the highest number of downloads came from the United Kingdom (1,080), United States (759), and Australia (127).

Publication title: Premanifest and early Huntington’s disease
UCL author: Sarah Tabrizi, Edward Wild
Publication type: Book chapter
Book title: Huntington’s Disease
Publication year: 2014
Discovery URL: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1447184/
Downloads since deposit: 966
Downloads last 12 months: 881

This is the final accepted manuscript of a chapter in a book dedicated to Huntington’s Disease. The publisher, Oxford University Press, allows authors to make their accepted manuscript available in institutional repositories after a delay period.

The manuscript for this book chapter is available in UCL Discovery from February 2016, and since then the downloads umber have been consistently increasing – from 18 in November 2016 to 115 in October this year. In last 12 months the paper was downloaded in 44 countries, and the highest number of downloads came from United States (305), the United Kingdom (261), and Australia (64).

Publication title: The sacral autonomic outflow is sympathetic
UCL author: William Richardson
Publication type: Journal article
Journal title: Science
Publication year: 2016
Discovery URL: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1530734/
Downloads since deposit: 1,108
Downloads last 12 months: 1,108

This is one of the most recent papers from the Faculty of Medical Sciences that is openly available in UCL Discovery; the author’s accepted manuscript has been available from the end of January 2017 and since then has been downloaded over 1,000 times, with peak downloads in February (249) and May (297). With so many downloads it is the top 5th paper in the faculty for past year.

The article was downloaded in 47 countries, and the highest number of downloads came from United States (280), Japan (196) and Italy (157).

UCL Discovery success stories – part 2

Patrycja ABarczynska26 October 2017

This year’s Open Access week runs from 23-29 October under the theme “Open in order to…” This is an invitation to reflect on many benefits of making research publications openly available. We are excited to present a series of blog posts demonstrating the benefits of making publications open access via UCL Discovery.

Access to research outside universities is often very restricted. Open access extends the audience for research – to academics without subscriptions (including in developing countries), professionals, businesses, civil servants, politicians in local and national government, doctors and patients, teachers and schoolchildren, amateur scholars and other interested laypeople.

UCL Discovery is a long established repository and authors depositing their papers in there benefit from increased visibility of their work. Articles available there are downloaded hundreds of times in many countries across the globe. Today we present some of the highly-downloaded papers from three faculties in UCL’s School of Laws, Arts and Humanities, and Social and Historical Sciences.

Publication title: The Rule in Wilkinson v Downton: Conduct, Intention, and Justifiability
UCL author: Ying Liew
Publication type: Journal article
Journal title: Modern Law Review
Publication year: 2015
Discovery URL: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1460156/
Downloads since deposit: 1,214
Downloads last 12 months: 1,119

Wilkinson v Downtown is a famous English tort law decision from 1897 that recognised the tort of intentional infliction of emotional distress. This paper is in top 10 papers downloaded last month in the Faculty of Laws.

The version that is available in UCL Discovery is the author’s accepted manuscript, and this version of the article is also available in SSRN database, from where it was downloaded over 300 times. Over last 12 months the manuscript in UCL Disocvery was downloaded in 58 countries, and the highest number of downloads came from the United Kingdom (414), Australia (72) and United States (53).

Publication title: Brexit
UCL author: Veronique Munoz-Dardé
Publication type: Journal article
Journal title: The Philosophers’ Magazine
Publication year: 2016
Discovery URL: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1527367/
Downloads since deposit: 827
Downloads last 12 months: 827

The author’s accepted manuscript of this essay is available from November 2016, and since then it was downloaded over 800 times, with peak downloads in March (150), at the time when the Article 50 was triggered. There is also a free version of this paper available on The Philosopher’s Magazine website.

In last 12 months, the article was downloaded in 48 countries, and the highest number of downloads came from the United Kingdom (377), United States (72), and Germany (55).

Publication title: Culture and health
UCL authors: Beverly Butler, Joseph Calabrese, Angel Chater, Helen Chatterjee, Francois Guesnet, Robert Horne, Sushrut Jadhav, David Napier, Sonu Shamdasani, Jakob Stougaard-Nielsen, Linda Thomson, Amanda Williams, Christopher Willott, James Wilson, Katherine Wolf
Publication type: Journal article
Journal title: Lancet
Publication year: 2014
Discovery URL: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1452529/
Downloads since deposit: 1,092
Downloads last 12 months: 674

This paper reviews health and health practices as they relate to culture, and the authors show how inseparable health is from culturally affected perceptions of wellbeing. The version available in UCL Discovery is the author’s accepted manuscript, and Google Scholar provides a link to the UCL Discovery record of the paper.

The manuscript in UCL Discovery is available from May 2015, and since then it was downloaded over 1,000 times. In last 12 months the article was downloaded in 59 countries, and the highest number of downloads came from United States (217), the United Kingdom (97), and Australia (41).

UCL Discovery success stories – part 1

Patrycja ABarczynska25 October 2017

This year’s Open Access Week runs from 23-29 October under the theme “Open in order to…” This is an invitation to reflect on many benefits of making research publications openly available. We are excited to present a series of blog posts demonstrating the benefits of making publications open access via UCL Discovery.

Access to research outside universities is often very restricted. Open access extends the audience for research – to academics without subscriptions (including in developing countries), professionals, businesses, civil servants, politicians in local and national government, doctors and patients, teachers and schoolchildren, amateur scholars and other interested laypeople.

UCL Discovery is a long established repository and authors depositing their papers in there benefit from increased visibility of their work. Articles available there are downloaded hundreds of times in many countries across the globe. Today we present some of the highly-downloaded papers from three faculties in UCL’s School of the Built Environment, Engineering and Mathematical and Physical Sciences.

Publication title: King’s Cross: renaissance for whom?
UCL author: Michael Edwards
Publication type: Book chapter
Book title: Urban Design, Urban Renaissance and British Cities
Publication year: 2009
Discovery URL: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/14020/
Downloads since deposit: 7,193
Downloads last 12 months: 1,026

This book chapter has been downloaded over 7,000 times since the author deposited it. With more than 1,000 downloads over the last 12 months, and being one the 50 most-downloaded items this year, it is still one of UCL Discovery’s most popular publications from the Faculty of the Built Environment. Wikipedia article on King’s Cross Central links to the UCL Discovery record of the paper. This has no doubt added to the popularity of this publication.

The version that is available in UCL Discovery is the author’s accepted manuscript, and this is the only version of this publication available online. In last 12 months, the chapter has been downloaded in 41 countries in total, and the highest number of downloads came from the United Kingdom (467), United States (221), and Germany (182).

Publication title: Bayesian hierarchical model for the prediction of football results
UCL author: Gianluca Baio
Publication type: Journal article
Journal title: Journal of Applied Statistics
Publication year: 2010
Discovery URL: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/16040/
Downloads since deposit: 8,501
Downloads last 12 months: 454

This article deals with statistical modelling of sports data, a popular topic amongst both statisticians and sports fans. The version available in UCL Discovery is the author’s accepted manuscript, and it was downloaded over 8,500 times since deposit, with 454 downloads over last 12 months.

The paper was cited by numerous blogs on football and statistics, with some of the blogs linking to the UCL Discovery version of the paper, for example here. In last 12 months the manuscript was downloaded in 53 countries in total, and the highest number of downloads came from the United Kingdom (103), United States (38), and China (32). The accepted manuscript is openly available in other repositories too.

Come the next World Cup in 2018 we expect another spike of interest in the paper!

Publication title: The Lone Actor Terrorist and the TRAP-18
UCL author: Paul Gill
Publication type: Journal article
Journal title: Journal of Threat Assessment and Management
Publication year: 2016
Discovery URL: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1477463/
Downloads since deposit: 1,288
Downloads last 12 months: 940

Articles in UCL Discovery are made available according to publisher’s embargo periods. This means that there may be a delay of 6, 12 or 24 months before they can be made openly available. Fortunately, there is no embargo period on this paper, which has been open access since it was published in April 2016.

This is one of the most recent papers from the Faculty of Engineering that is openly available in UCL Discovery. In last 12 months the manuscript was downloaded in 60 countries, and the highest number of downloads came from the United Kingdom (211), United States (180), and Germany (87).