Open Access
  • FORCE11 Scholarly Communication Institute (FSCI) 2018

    By Patrycja A Barczynska, on 16 August 2018

    A couple of weeks ago I attended the second FORCE 11 Scholarly Communication Institute (FSCI) held at the University of California, San Diego – a week long training course with workshops led by experts in their fields. FSCI was attended by librarians, researchers, students, post docs, and administrators from all over the world. This presented an excellent opportunity to learn about scholarly communication practices and processes at institutions not only in the United States but also in countries like Australia, Argentina, Canada, Chile, China, Nigeria, and Russia.

    Participants of the FORCE 11 summer camp selected three courses from an extensive course list. All classes were very intensive, run in form of workshops and required high level of active participation and beforehand preparation from attendees. Morning classes were run through the whole week, afternoon ones were run for two days; this allowed for in-depth learning experience, and gave an opportunity for stimulating discussions. Evening activities included a slideshow karaoke (which was fun!), do-a-thon (a work-sprint where people with different skills work together on different projects), and a party at Scripps Institution of Oceanograhy that included Scripps Pier tours and famous fish tacos.

    FORCE11 Scholarly Communications Institute at the University of California, San Diego

    My morning classes, Data in the Scholarly Communications Life Cycle, were expertly and entertainingly led by Natasha Simmons from Australian National Data Service (ANDS). The sessions were based on the 23 (research data) Things programme developed by ANDS, with guest speakers that introduced specific topics related to data managment. The classes provided us with an opportunity to work with data managment plans, create metadata for existing datasets (which proved more difficult than we all thought!), and of course stimulated many discussions.

    We discussed licensing, the approaches to signing the commitment and FAIR data assessment tool, and how the research data lifecycle offers a framework for assisting with how to understand research processes. The highlight of the course was the open data debate, in which we argued for and against making your research data openly available. The classes helped me understand the issues and challanges around making research data open, and the nuances involved in the processes and licensing.

    Data in the Scholarly Communications Life Cycle

    My first afternoon class, held on Monday and Tuesday, was on the Open Science experience in Latin America and the Carribean, and was taught by a group of librarians and researchers from Argetnina, Canada, Chile, and United States. We learnt about the long history of Open Science in Latin America and the Carribean, and discussed national laws in Argentina, Brazil, Mexico and Peru that seek to make scientific knowledge produced with public funds openly available. The instructors also highlighted regional projects such as Scielo and redalyc.org that have played an important role in making open access the most established communication model in the region.

    Open South: The Open Science Experience in Latin America and the Caribbean

    Micah Vandegrift, Open Knowledge Librarian at North Carolina State University and Samantha Wallace, PhD candidate in English at University of Virginia led my Wednesday – Thursday workshop on Public Humanities as Scholarly Communication. The class turned into a thought provoking discussion on nature of humanities, and the public. It made me reflect on the role of the public in public humanities, and how public is intrinsic to humanities; engaging public and communities should be a natural part of academic investigation.

    Public Humanities as Scholarly Communication

    Discussions in and outside of classes were inspiring, as is meeting people who are passionate about increasing access to knowledge and learning about the practices that differ from your own. The level of workshops delivery was excellent; observing different styles of teaching and how instructors engage with their audiences made me develop new ideas for training sessions that I provide for UCL academics. I found this intensive and demanding course, converstations with instructors and attendess extremely stimulating. And all of this in sunny California, where you see hummingbirds on your way to the class, on a university campus half an hour from the beach.

    La Jolla beach

    Further details on the workshops, including links to materials, will be available on the blog next week.

    REF submission guidance: what it means for open access

    By Catherine L Sharp, on 26 July 2018

    The new draft REF submission guidance includes two sections on open access: paragraphs 107-116 on the intent of the REF open access policy, and paragraphs 213-245 on the detail of the requirements. For the most part, the new provisions restate the requirements that will by now be familiar to all academics. One or two changes and adjustments may be helpful for UCL authors, though.

    1. A key change that will affect UCL’s REF submission as a whole is that a small percentage – 5% – of the total number of articles and conference papers that an institution submits may be non-compliant. This is very welcome, because it will allow us to submit some older outputs that were accepted before authors were used to the open access requirements. In due course, UCL will introduce guidelines for submitting non-compliant outputs, but these will be selected very carefully. Note that this provision should be treated with caution, and authors should not rely on it for any existing or new papers.

    More widely, the new guidance emphasises that the environment section will allow units of assessment to demonstrate where they have gone beyond the REF requirements. This is one of the reasons that UCL’s monthly compliance reports to departments include all articles and conference papers.  Academics should continue to upload all papers to RPS within 3 months of first online publication (ideally within 3 months of acceptance), regardless of whether they will be submitted to the REF.

    2. There is a second important change for users of arXiv and other preprint services. Where a paper has been uploaded to a preprint service, and the version in the preprint service is the same as the accepted manuscript, and it was uploaded to the preprint service before it was published online, the paper complies with the open access policy. This is particularly good news for users of arXiv, but it does not mean that all papers in arXiv comply with the open access policy.

    UCL’s Open Access Team already assesses papers in arXiv and uploads them to RPS (to demonstrate compliance with the policy) where they are Gold open access, where the arXiv version is identified as the accepted manuscript, or where the publisher allows the published version to be used in RPS/UCL Discovery. This additional provision means that if authors confirm that the version in arXiv is the same as the accepted manuscript/published version, the paper can be marked as compliant in RPS. If this applies to any of your papers, please contact the Open Access Team (open-access@ucl.ac.uk).

    3. The guidance restates the exceptions to the policy, including the exception where a new member of staff uploaded their manuscript to their previous institution’s repository. UCL’s advice remains the same: where this exception applies, academics should contact the Open Access Team (open-access@ucl.ac.uk) so that we can check whether the paper complies and record the exception if not.

    4. There is no change to the timing requirements. The strict requirement is that papers are uploaded to RPS within three months of acceptance (defined as the “’firm’ accepted date”), but there is an exception (which UCL’s Open Access Team will apply) for papers that do not meet this deadline, but that are uploaded within 3 months of first online publication (the “’early online’ date”). In practice, if a record does not appear in RPS within one month of first online publication, authors are advised to create a manual record, and to upload their manuscript to it. There is a guide to creating manual records on our webpages.

    Please contact the Open Access Team for more information.

    UCL Open Science Day

    By Patrycja A Barczynska, on 18 July 2018

    On 25th of June UCL held the first UCL Open Science Day, a one-day workshop organised by UCL Library Services with support from UCL Organisational Development. Over sixty people attanded the workshop, and the day began with a welcome from Professor David Price, Vice-Provost (Research).

    Morning sessions discussed different aspects of and perspectives on Open Science. Dr Paul Ayris, Director of UCL Library Services and Pro-Vice-Provost, started with an analysis of the LERU Roadmap for Open Science from the League of European Research Universities. After this introduction to Open Science Dr Catriona MacCallum, Director of Open Science, Hindawi, followed with a publisher’s perspective on the Open Science movement. Professor James Wilsdon from the University of Sheffield presented an overview of the responsible use of metrics in an Open Science environment.

    After the break Simon Hetrrick from Software Sustainability Institute followed with a talk about the role of software in Open Science. Dr Emily Sena from the University of Edinburgh ended the session with a presentation on how Open Science can help in pre-clinical work.

    In the afternoon attendees participated in one of the five breakout sessions:

    • How do we make Open the default at UCL?
    • How to make your data Open and FAIR
    • UCL Press: engaging in Open Peer Review
    • Open Education: Introducing OpenEd@UCL
    • Citizen Science in research: UCL ExCites

    These workshops gave an opportunity to ask for practical advice and to discuss different aspects of Open Science in a greater detail.

    The day ended with a panel discussion – Dr Paul Ayris, Director of UCL Library Services and Pro-Vice-Provost, Professor David Bogle, Pro-Vice-Provost, UCL Doctoral School, and Clare Gryce, Director of Research IT Services, UCL ISD answered questions from the audience about the emerging role of Open Science at UCL. Following the panel, Rebecca Lawrence from F1000 delivered a final presentation on embedding Open Science in university culture.

    Presentations from the sessions are now available in UCL Discovery, under the following links:

    UCL Open Science Day: developing open scholarship at UCL

    By Patrycja A Barczynska, on 12 June 2018

    On 25th June UCL is holding Open Science Day. The workshop will explore the facets of Open Science and how these are/could be pursued by UCL researchers. In the morning speakers will discuss different aspects of and perspectives on Open Science, and the afternoon workshops will offer practical advice.

    Open Science, or Open Scholarship, is a movement that extends the principles of openness to the whole research cycle; it goes beyond making the primary outputs of publically funded research open access.

    Open Science beehive, available from https://www.fosteropenscience.eu/content/what-open-science-introduction, under CC BY licence

    Open Science includes various movements that aim at making every step in the research lifecycle open. It starts with Open Notebooks, an emerging practice of sharing the entire record of the research project. With Open Notebooks researchers share raw and processed data, failed and other experiments that otherwise would remain unpublished. Open Data focuses on the next step in the research cycle. The data related to a research project is managed to ensure that it is easily discoverable and accessible, and can be shared. You can find out about Research Data Management at UCL here.

    Open Peer Review has many definitions. The most open approach would be to post the whole pre-publication history of the article online, with reviewers’ comments, authors’ responses and previous versions of the article. See Wellcome Open Research for an example of a platform that publishes research with open peer-review. Open Access is making research articles freely available online, preferably under a licence that allows re-use, so that they can be used and shared easily. Open Source involves sharing software including the source code, also in a fully accessible and discoverable way; the code and software can be freely disseminated and adapted.

    In the movement, there is also space for Scientific social networks; researchers can share scientific knowledge not only by responsible use of social sites like ResearchGate.net and Academia.edu but also via platforms like Twitter and LinkedIn .

    Part of the movement is involving general public in the process of scientific research via Citizen Science, where non-academic public can actively contribute to science. This can be a part of public engagement programme at an institution or crowdsourcing research activities, as in UCL’s project Transcribe Bentham or ExCiteS. Open educational resources is yet another step in making research openly available, and it involves making materials that are useful for both teaching and research purposes freely available and usable.

    If you want to find out more about Open Science register for UCL Open Science Day via Eventbrite.

    The work of UCL’s Open Access Team

    By Patrycja A Barczynska, on 6 February 2018

    UCL’s Open Access Team is part of UCL Library Services. We provide advice on open access issues to all UCL researchers. This includes answering enquires from academics and advising on the most appropriate open access options, taking into account the journal type, authorship and funding that contributed to the article.

    Green open access and the REF Policy

    Much of our work involves supporting academics in using UCL’s Research Publications Service (RPS), and helping them to comply with the REF open access policy. We answer RPS- and REF-related enquires, provide individual and group training sessions, and compile regular compliance and engagement reports for departments. We also check every new article or conference proceeding record in RPS to ensure that acceptance, online publication and print publication dates are recorded correctly. Where an accepted manuscript is available on the journal’s website, or the journal’s copyright policy allows us to use the published PDF, we upload a file to RPS on the author’s behalf. If the article is published as Gold open access with a licence that allows re-use, it falls under an exception in the REF open access policy, so we add the exception to the article record and make the published PDF openly available in UCL Discovery.

    In most cases, in order to comply with the REF policy and benefit from open access, the author needs to upload the accepted manuscript version of their paper to RPS. When we receive a new manuscript through RPS, the Open Access Team checks the publisher’s policy and applies any required delay period before making the manuscript openly available in UCL Discovery. If the author has uploaded a version that cannot be made open access, we contact them to request the accepted manuscript.

    Separately, we manage open access for research theses. At present, there are more than 9,000 theses openly available in UCL Discovery.

    Gold open access

    UCL encourages Green open access. However, in some cases funds are available for Gold open access: where papers are funded by one of the UK Research Councils or the COAF medical charities, or where the article is published in a fully open access journal (where open access charges are mandatory and all papers are made openly available). We check whether papers are eligible for funding, and arrange payment – either by an invoice or via one of our prepayment agreements. Where we have paid for open access, we ensure that the paper is made openly available with a Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) licence when it’s published. We also report regularly to RCUK and COAF.

    Getting in touch

    The Open Access Team is based in the Main and Science Libraries. We can be contacted via e-mail, by phone (020 3108 1336 (internal 51336)), and via our web form here.

    UCL’s APC spend: an analysis

    By Catherine L Sharp, on 22 November 2017

    All institutions with block grant funding for open access from the UK Research Councils (RCUK) and the COAF medical charities submit annual reports on their APC spend to those funders. However, since reporting periods vary, and it can be difficult to compare spend across funders, at UCL we find it useful to collate our spend from our RCUK and COAF funds, as well as from our small institutional open access fund, and to draw out comparative data, including our average APC payment by fund, and most (and least) expensive publishers. What follows is an analysis of our APC spend from our three open access budgets for August 2016-July 2017.

    During this period, a total of £3.3 million was paid from UCL’s RCUK, COAF and institutional open access funds, for 1,946 APCs. 54% came from RCUK funds, 26% from COAF funds and 20% (including 100 unfunded SpringerCompact papers) from UCL funds. The average (mean) APC, across all budgets, was £1,704 (including VAT). The average APC paid from UCL’s institutional fund was much lower, at £1,363, because the UCL fund is reserved almost exclusively for APCs in fully open access journals. The average APC paid from UCL’s RCUK funds was £1,730; the average from UCL’s COAF funds was £2,167.

    Although 99 publishers received APC payments from UCL, more than 70% of the APCs paid were to 10 large publishers. The average APC paid to these “top ten” publishers varies from £594 for Taylor and Francis papers to £2,184 for Elsevier APCs. 63% of payments were made under a prepayment arrangement, the rest by invoice.

    The chart below (click to expand) shows all publishers who received more than 10 APC payments from UCL’s funds in 2016-17.

    APC graph

    This comparison reflects the disparity between APC costs in hybrid and fully open access journals, the relatively high cost of APCs paid to some smaller publishers (Wolters Kluwer, costing £2,903 per APC on average, and Society for Neuroscience at £2,763), and also the large total sums paid to hybrid publishers in addition to subscription charges. When we repeat this analysis next year, and in future, we hope that we’ll see improvements resulting from genuine subscription/APC offsetting deals, of the sort that Springer and Institute of Physics Publishing have pioneered.

    UCL Discovery success stories – part 3

    By Patrycja A Barczynska, on 27 October 2017

    This year’s Open Access week runs from 23-29 October under the theme “Open in order to…” This is an invitation to reflect on many benefits of making research publications openly available. We are excited to present a series of blog posts demonstrating the benefits of making publications open access via UCL Discovery.

    Access to research outside universities is often very restricted. Open access extends the audience for research – to academics without subscriptions (including in developing countries), professionals, businesses, civil servants, politicians in local and national government, doctors and patients, teachers and schoolchildren, amateur scholars and other interested laypeople.

    UCL Discovery is a long established repository and authors depositing their papers in there benefit from increased visibility of their work. Articles available there are downloaded hundreds of times in many countries across the globe. Today, in the last post in the series, we present some of the highly-downloaded papers from three faculties in UCL’s School of Life and Medical Sciences.

    Publication title: Attachment and Personality Disorders: A Short Review
    UCL authors: Peter Fonagy, Nicolas Lorenzini
    Publication type: Journal article
    Journal title: FOCUS: The Journal of Lifelong Learning in Psychiatry
    Publication year: 2013
    Discovery URL: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1430370/
    Downloads since deposit: 4,487
    Downloads last 12 months: 3,033

    This paper examines the relationship between attachment and personality disorders. The final accepted manuscript was made available in May 2014, after the delay period required by the journal.

    This is a highly popular paper, and the article downloads are increasing, with rarely being below 100 per month and reaching peak of 668 downloads in July this year. With almost 3,000 downloads it became one the 50 most-downloaded items in last 12 months. During this period the manuscript was downloaded in 97 countries, and the highest number of downloads came from the United Kingdom (1,080), United States (759), and Australia (127).

    Publication title: Premanifest and early Huntington’s disease
    UCL author: Sarah Tabrizi, Edward Wild
    Publication type: Book chapter
    Book title: Huntington’s Disease
    Publication year: 2014
    Discovery URL: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1447184/
    Downloads since deposit: 966
    Downloads last 12 months: 881

    This is the final accepted manuscript of a chapter in a book dedicated to Huntington’s Disease. The publisher, Oxford University Press, allows authors to make their accepted manuscript available in institutional repositories after a delay period.

    The manuscript for this book chapter is available in UCL Discovery from February 2016, and since then the downloads umber have been consistently increasing – from 18 in November 2016 to 115 in October this year. In last 12 months the paper was downloaded in 44 countries, and the highest number of downloads came from United States (305), the United Kingdom (261), and Australia (64).

    Publication title: The sacral autonomic outflow is sympathetic
    UCL author: William Richardson
    Publication type: Journal article
    Journal title: Science
    Publication year: 2016
    Discovery URL: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1530734/
    Downloads since deposit: 1,108
    Downloads last 12 months: 1,108

    This is one of the most recent papers from the Faculty of Medical Sciences that is openly available in UCL Discovery; the author’s accepted manuscript has been available from the end of January 2017 and since then has been downloaded over 1,000 times, with peak downloads in February (249) and May (297). With so many downloads it is the top 5th paper in the faculty for past year.

    The article was downloaded in 47 countries, and the highest number of downloads came from United States (280), Japan (196) and Italy (157).

    UCL Discovery success stories – part 2

    By Patrycja A Barczynska, on 26 October 2017

    This year’s Open Access week runs from 23-29 October under the theme “Open in order to…” This is an invitation to reflect on many benefits of making research publications openly available. We are excited to present a series of blog posts demonstrating the benefits of making publications open access via UCL Discovery.

    Access to research outside universities is often very restricted. Open access extends the audience for research – to academics without subscriptions (including in developing countries), professionals, businesses, civil servants, politicians in local and national government, doctors and patients, teachers and schoolchildren, amateur scholars and other interested laypeople.

    UCL Discovery is a long established repository and authors depositing their papers in there benefit from increased visibility of their work. Articles available there are downloaded hundreds of times in many countries across the globe. Today we present some of the highly-downloaded papers from three faculties in UCL’s School of Laws, Arts and Humanities, and Social and Historical Sciences.

    Publication title: The Rule in Wilkinson v Downton: Conduct, Intention, and Justifiability
    UCL author: Ying Liew
    Publication type: Journal article
    Journal title: Modern Law Review
    Publication year: 2015
    Discovery URL: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1460156/
    Downloads since deposit: 1,214
    Downloads last 12 months: 1,119

    Wilkinson v Downtown is a famous English tort law decision from 1897 that recognised the tort of intentional infliction of emotional distress. This paper is in top 10 papers downloaded last month in the Faculty of Laws.

    The version that is available in UCL Discovery is the author’s accepted manuscript, and this version of the article is also available in SSRN database, from where it was downloaded over 300 times. Over last 12 months the manuscript in UCL Disocvery was downloaded in 58 countries, and the highest number of downloads came from the United Kingdom (414), Australia (72) and United States (53).

    Publication title: Brexit
    UCL author: Veronique Munoz-Dardé
    Publication type: Journal article
    Journal title: The Philosophers’ Magazine
    Publication year: 2016
    Discovery URL: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1527367/
    Downloads since deposit: 827
    Downloads last 12 months: 827

    The author’s accepted manuscript of this essay is available from November 2016, and since then it was downloaded over 800 times, with peak downloads in March (150), at the time when the Article 50 was triggered. There is also a free version of this paper available on The Philosopher’s Magazine website.

    In last 12 months, the article was downloaded in 48 countries, and the highest number of downloads came from the United Kingdom (377), United States (72), and Germany (55).

    Publication title: Culture and health
    UCL authors: Beverly Butler, Joseph Calabrese, Angel Chater, Helen Chatterjee, Francois Guesnet, Robert Horne, Sushrut Jadhav, David Napier, Sonu Shamdasani, Jakob Stougaard-Nielsen, Linda Thomson, Amanda Williams, Christopher Willott, James Wilson, Katherine Wolf
    Publication type: Journal article
    Journal title: Lancet
    Publication year: 2014
    Discovery URL: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1452529/
    Downloads since deposit: 1,092
    Downloads last 12 months: 674

    This paper reviews health and health practices as they relate to culture, and the authors show how inseparable health is from culturally affected perceptions of wellbeing. The version available in UCL Discovery is the author’s accepted manuscript, and Google Scholar provides a link to the UCL Discovery record of the paper.

    The manuscript in UCL Discovery is available from May 2015, and since then it was downloaded over 1,000 times. In last 12 months the article was downloaded in 59 countries, and the highest number of downloads came from United States (217), the United Kingdom (97), and Australia (41).

    UCL Discovery success stories – part 1

    By Patrycja A Barczynska, on 25 October 2017

    This year’s Open Access Week runs from 23-29 October under the theme “Open in order to…” This is an invitation to reflect on many benefits of making research publications openly available. We are excited to present a series of blog posts demonstrating the benefits of making publications open access via UCL Discovery.

    Access to research outside universities is often very restricted. Open access extends the audience for research – to academics without subscriptions (including in developing countries), professionals, businesses, civil servants, politicians in local and national government, doctors and patients, teachers and schoolchildren, amateur scholars and other interested laypeople.

    UCL Discovery is a long established repository and authors depositing their papers in there benefit from increased visibility of their work. Articles available there are downloaded hundreds of times in many countries across the globe. Today we present some of the highly-downloaded papers from three faculties in UCL’s School of the Built Environment, Engineering and Mathematical and Physical Sciences.

    Publication title: King’s Cross: renaissance for whom?
    UCL author: Michael Edwards
    Publication type: Book chapter
    Book title: Urban Design, Urban Renaissance and British Cities
    Publication year: 2009
    Discovery URL: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/14020/
    Downloads since deposit: 7,193
    Downloads last 12 months: 1,026

    This book chapter has been downloaded over 7,000 times since the author deposited it. With more than 1,000 downloads over the last 12 months, and being one the 50 most-downloaded items this year, it is still one of UCL Discovery’s most popular publications from the Faculty of the Built Environment. Wikipedia article on King’s Cross Central links to the UCL Discovery record of the paper. This has no doubt added to the popularity of this publication.

    The version that is available in UCL Discovery is the author’s accepted manuscript, and this is the only version of this publication available online. In last 12 months, the chapter has been downloaded in 41 countries in total, and the highest number of downloads came from the United Kingdom (467), United States (221), and Germany (182).

    Publication title: Bayesian hierarchical model for the prediction of football results
    UCL author: Gianluca Baio
    Publication type: Journal article
    Journal title: Journal of Applied Statistics
    Publication year: 2010
    Discovery URL: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/16040/
    Downloads since deposit: 8,501
    Downloads last 12 months: 454

    This article deals with statistical modelling of sports data, a popular topic amongst both statisticians and sports fans. The version available in UCL Discovery is the author’s accepted manuscript, and it was downloaded over 8,500 times since deposit, with 454 downloads over last 12 months.

    The paper was cited by numerous blogs on football and statistics, with some of the blogs linking to the UCL Discovery version of the paper, for example here. In last 12 months the manuscript was downloaded in 53 countries in total, and the highest number of downloads came from the United Kingdom (103), United States (38), and China (32). The accepted manuscript is openly available in other repositories too.

    Come the next World Cup in 2018 we expect another spike of interest in the paper!

    Publication title: The Lone Actor Terrorist and the TRAP-18
    UCL author: Paul Gill
    Publication type: Journal article
    Journal title: Journal of Threat Assessment and Management
    Publication year: 2016
    Discovery URL: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1477463/
    Downloads since deposit: 1,288
    Downloads last 12 months: 940

    Articles in UCL Discovery are made available according to publisher’s embargo periods. This means that there may be a delay of 6, 12 or 24 months before they can be made openly available. Fortunately, there is no embargo period on this paper, which has been open access since it was published in April 2016.

    This is one of the most recent papers from the Faculty of Engineering that is openly available in UCL Discovery. In last 12 months the manuscript was downloaded in 60 countries, and the highest number of downloads came from the United Kingdom (211), United States (180), and Germany (87).

    Automatic publication claiming in RPS

    By Patrycja A Barczynska, on 24 October 2017

    This year’s Open Access Week runs from 23-29 October under the theme “Open in order to…” This is an invitation to reflect on many benefits of making research publications openly available. We are excited to present a series of blog posts celebrating the Open Access Week, starting with the announcement of new RPS functionality that is now available to UCL authors.

    Most UCL researchers are used to the way Research Publications Service (RPS) searches external databases (like Scopus and Web of Science) to find publications that may belong to UCL authors, based on their search settings. By default, suggested publications are put in the pending publications list, where they can be manually reviewed and claimed (or rejected). Now, though, after a recent upgrade, RPS is even better at helping UCL authors record their publications.

    We are very excited about the latest upgrade to RPS that introduced new tool that helps authors to identify their papers: auto-claiming. More than 2,000 authors at UCL already use their ORCID in RPS, but UCL’s Research Publications Service can now find and claim even more papers, using even more identifiers including e-mail address. When RPS can tell that a paper belongs to the author, it claims it automatically.

    This new tool helps researchers to identify their papers and record them in RPS quickly, as it minimises number of publications that are sent to the pending list and need to be verified by authors. Now, all they need to do is to upload the final accepted manuscript for their research articles and conference proceedings, in compliance with the REF open access policy. Deposited manuscripts are then made openly available via UCL Discovery, UCL’s institutional repository (after a delay period, if publisher requires it).

    Authors can set RPS to automatically claim or reject their publications, if they contain any of the following identifiers:

    • e-mail addresses
    • arXiv Author Identifier
    • com account
    • ORCID ID
    • Researcher ID
    • Scopus ID
    • SSRN Author ID

    By default, the author’s UCL e-mail address is entered automatically, but other e-mail addresses used by researchers can be added.

    Another very useful aspect of this new RPS feature is automated rejection of publications based on an identifier. When authors declare that certain identifier is not theirs, all publications that include that identifier will be automatically rejected and no longer be offered to the user for verification. This is particularly useful for authors with common names, and minimises the number of publications that are sent to the author’s pending publication list.

    There is a guide explaining how to set up automated claiming available here, but if you have any questions about this or other aspects of RPS, please contact UCL Open Access Team at open-access@ucl.ac.uk