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    UCL’s APC spend: an analysis

    By Catherine L Sharp, on 22 November 2017

    All institutions with block grant funding for open access from the UK Research Councils (RCUK) and the COAF medical charities submit annual reports on their APC spend to those funders. However, since reporting periods vary, and it can be difficult to compare spend across funders, at UCL we find it useful to collate our spend from our RCUK and COAF funds, as well as from our small institutional open access fund, and to draw out comparative data, including our average APC payment by fund, and most (and least) expensive publishers. What follows is an analysis of our APC spend from our three open access budgets for August 2016-July 2017.

    During this period, a total of £3.3 million was paid from UCL’s RCUK, COAF and institutional open access funds, for 1,946 APCs. 54% came from RCUK funds, 26% from COAF funds and 20% (including 100 unfunded SpringerCompact papers) from UCL funds. The average (mean) APC, across all budgets, was £1,704 (including VAT). The average APC paid from UCL’s institutional fund was much lower, at £1,363, because the UCL fund is reserved almost exclusively for APCs in fully open access journals. The average APC paid from UCL’s RCUK funds was £1,730; the average from UCL’s COAF funds was £2,167.

    Although 99 publishers received APC payments from UCL, more than 70% of the APCs paid were to 10 large publishers. The average APC paid to these “top ten” publishers varies from £594 for Taylor and Francis papers to £2,184 for Elsevier APCs. 63% of payments were made under a prepayment arrangement, the rest by invoice.

    The chart below (click to expand) shows all publishers who received more than 10 APC payments from UCL’s funds in 2016-17.

    APC graph

    This comparison reflects the disparity between APC costs in hybrid and fully open access journals, the relatively high cost of APCs paid to some smaller publishers (Wolters Kluwer, costing £2,903 per APC on average, and Society for Neuroscience at £2,763), and also the large total sums paid to hybrid publishers in addition to subscription charges. When we repeat this analysis next year, and in future, we hope that we’ll see improvements resulting from genuine subscription/APC offsetting deals, of the sort that Springer and Institute of Physics Publishing have pioneered.

    UCL Discovery success stories – part 3

    By Patrycja A Barczynska, on 27 October 2017

    This year’s Open Access week runs from 23-29 October under the theme “Open in order to…” This is an invitation to reflect on many benefits of making research publications openly available. We are excited to present a series of blog posts demonstrating the benefits of making publications open access via UCL Discovery.

    Access to research outside universities is often very restricted. Open access extends the audience for research – to academics without subscriptions (including in developing countries), professionals, businesses, civil servants, politicians in local and national government, doctors and patients, teachers and schoolchildren, amateur scholars and other interested laypeople.

    UCL Discovery is a long established repository and authors depositing their papers in there benefit from increased visibility of their work. Articles available there are downloaded hundreds of times in many countries across the globe. Today, in the last post in the series, we present some of the highly-downloaded papers from three faculties in UCL’s School of Life and Medical Sciences.

    Publication title: Attachment and Personality Disorders: A Short Review
    UCL authors: Peter Fonagy, Nicolas Lorenzini
    Publication type: Journal article
    Journal title: FOCUS: The Journal of Lifelong Learning in Psychiatry
    Publication year: 2013
    Discovery URL: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1430370/
    Downloads since deposit: 4,487
    Downloads last 12 months: 3,033

    This paper examines the relationship between attachment and personality disorders. The final accepted manuscript was made available in May 2014, after the delay period required by the journal.

    This is a highly popular paper, and the article downloads are increasing, with rarely being below 100 per month and reaching peak of 668 downloads in July this year. With almost 3,000 downloads it became one the 50 most-downloaded items in last 12 months. During this period the manuscript was downloaded in 97 countries, and the highest number of downloads came from the United Kingdom (1,080), United States (759), and Australia (127).

    Publication title: Premanifest and early Huntington’s disease
    UCL author: Sarah Tabrizi, Edward Wild
    Publication type: Book chapter
    Book title: Huntington’s Disease
    Publication year: 2014
    Discovery URL: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1447184/
    Downloads since deposit: 966
    Downloads last 12 months: 881

    This is the final accepted manuscript of a chapter in a book dedicated to Huntington’s Disease. The publisher, Oxford University Press, allows authors to make their accepted manuscript available in institutional repositories after a delay period.

    The manuscript for this book chapter is available in UCL Discovery from February 2016, and since then the downloads umber have been consistently increasing – from 18 in November 2016 to 115 in October this year. In last 12 months the paper was downloaded in 44 countries, and the highest number of downloads came from United States (305), the United Kingdom (261), and Australia (64).

    Publication title: The sacral autonomic outflow is sympathetic
    UCL author: William Richardson
    Publication type: Journal article
    Journal title: Science
    Publication year: 2016
    Discovery URL: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1530734/
    Downloads since deposit: 1,108
    Downloads last 12 months: 1,108

    This is one of the most recent papers from the Faculty of Medical Sciences that is openly available in UCL Discovery; the author’s accepted manuscript has been available from the end of January 2017 and since then has been downloaded over 1,000 times, with peak downloads in February (249) and May (297). With so many downloads it is the top 5th paper in the faculty for past year.

    The article was downloaded in 47 countries, and the highest number of downloads came from United States (280), Japan (196) and Italy (157).

    UCL Discovery success stories – part 2

    By Patrycja A Barczynska, on 26 October 2017

    This year’s Open Access week runs from 23-29 October under the theme “Open in order to…” This is an invitation to reflect on many benefits of making research publications openly available. We are excited to present a series of blog posts demonstrating the benefits of making publications open access via UCL Discovery.

    Access to research outside universities is often very restricted. Open access extends the audience for research – to academics without subscriptions (including in developing countries), professionals, businesses, civil servants, politicians in local and national government, doctors and patients, teachers and schoolchildren, amateur scholars and other interested laypeople.

    UCL Discovery is a long established repository and authors depositing their papers in there benefit from increased visibility of their work. Articles available there are downloaded hundreds of times in many countries across the globe. Today we present some of the highly-downloaded papers from three faculties in UCL’s School of Laws, Arts and Humanities, and Social and Historical Sciences.

    Publication title: The Rule in Wilkinson v Downton: Conduct, Intention, and Justifiability
    UCL author: Ying Liew
    Publication type: Journal article
    Journal title: Modern Law Review
    Publication year: 2015
    Discovery URL: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1460156/
    Downloads since deposit: 1,214
    Downloads last 12 months: 1,119

    Wilkinson v Downtown is a famous English tort law decision from 1897 that recognised the tort of intentional infliction of emotional distress. This paper is in top 10 papers downloaded last month in the Faculty of Laws.

    The version that is available in UCL Discovery is the author’s accepted manuscript, and this version of the article is also available in SSRN database, from where it was downloaded over 300 times. Over last 12 months the manuscript in UCL Disocvery was downloaded in 58 countries, and the highest number of downloads came from the United Kingdom (414), Australia (72) and United States (53).

    Publication title: Brexit
    UCL author: Veronique Munoz-Dardé
    Publication type: Journal article
    Journal title: The Philosophers’ Magazine
    Publication year: 2016
    Discovery URL: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1527367/
    Downloads since deposit: 827
    Downloads last 12 months: 827

    The author’s accepted manuscript of this essay is available from November 2016, and since then it was downloaded over 800 times, with peak downloads in March (150), at the time when the Article 50 was triggered. There is also a free version of this paper available on The Philosopher’s Magazine website.

    In last 12 months, the article was downloaded in 48 countries, and the highest number of downloads came from the United Kingdom (377), United States (72), and Germany (55).

    Publication title: Culture and health
    UCL authors: Beverly Butler, Joseph Calabrese, Angel Chater, Helen Chatterjee, Francois Guesnet, Robert Horne, Sushrut Jadhav, David Napier, Sonu Shamdasani, Jakob Stougaard-Nielsen, Linda Thomson, Amanda Williams, Christopher Willott, James Wilson, Katherine Wolf
    Publication type: Journal article
    Journal title: Lancet
    Publication year: 2014
    Discovery URL: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1452529/
    Downloads since deposit: 1,092
    Downloads last 12 months: 674

    This paper reviews health and health practices as they relate to culture, and the authors show how inseparable health is from culturally affected perceptions of wellbeing. The version available in UCL Discovery is the author’s accepted manuscript, and Google Scholar provides a link to the UCL Discovery record of the paper.

    The manuscript in UCL Discovery is available from May 2015, and since then it was downloaded over 1,000 times. In last 12 months the article was downloaded in 59 countries, and the highest number of downloads came from United States (217), the United Kingdom (97), and Australia (41).

    UCL Discovery success stories – part 1

    By Patrycja A Barczynska, on 25 October 2017

    This year’s Open Access Week runs from 23-29 October under the theme “Open in order to…” This is an invitation to reflect on many benefits of making research publications openly available. We are excited to present a series of blog posts demonstrating the benefits of making publications open access via UCL Discovery.

    Access to research outside universities is often very restricted. Open access extends the audience for research – to academics without subscriptions (including in developing countries), professionals, businesses, civil servants, politicians in local and national government, doctors and patients, teachers and schoolchildren, amateur scholars and other interested laypeople.

    UCL Discovery is a long established repository and authors depositing their papers in there benefit from increased visibility of their work. Articles available there are downloaded hundreds of times in many countries across the globe. Today we present some of the highly-downloaded papers from three faculties in UCL’s School of the Built Environment, Engineering and Mathematical and Physical Sciences.

    Publication title: King’s Cross: renaissance for whom?
    UCL author: Michael Edwards
    Publication type: Book chapter
    Book title: Urban Design, Urban Renaissance and British Cities
    Publication year: 2009
    Discovery URL: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/14020/
    Downloads since deposit: 7,193
    Downloads last 12 months: 1,026

    This book chapter has been downloaded over 7,000 times since the author deposited it. With more than 1,000 downloads over the last 12 months, and being one the 50 most-downloaded items this year, it is still one of UCL Discovery’s most popular publications from the Faculty of the Built Environment. Wikipedia article on King’s Cross Central links to the UCL Discovery record of the paper. This has no doubt added to the popularity of this publication.

    The version that is available in UCL Discovery is the author’s accepted manuscript, and this is the only version of this publication available online. In last 12 months, the chapter has been downloaded in 41 countries in total, and the highest number of downloads came from the United Kingdom (467), United States (221), and Germany (182).

    Publication title: Bayesian hierarchical model for the prediction of football results
    UCL author: Gianluca Baio
    Publication type: Journal article
    Journal title: Journal of Applied Statistics
    Publication year: 2010
    Discovery URL: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/16040/
    Downloads since deposit: 8,501
    Downloads last 12 months: 454

    This article deals with statistical modelling of sports data, a popular topic amongst both statisticians and sports fans. The version available in UCL Discovery is the author’s accepted manuscript, and it was downloaded over 8,500 times since deposit, with 454 downloads over last 12 months.

    The paper was cited by numerous blogs on football and statistics, with some of the blogs linking to the UCL Discovery version of the paper, for example here. In last 12 months the manuscript was downloaded in 53 countries in total, and the highest number of downloads came from the United Kingdom (103), United States (38), and China (32). The accepted manuscript is openly available in other repositories too.

    Come the next World Cup in 2018 we expect another spike of interest in the paper!

    Publication title: The Lone Actor Terrorist and the TRAP-18
    UCL author: Paul Gill
    Publication type: Journal article
    Journal title: Journal of Threat Assessment and Management
    Publication year: 2016
    Discovery URL: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1477463/
    Downloads since deposit: 1,288
    Downloads last 12 months: 940

    Articles in UCL Discovery are made available according to publisher’s embargo periods. This means that there may be a delay of 6, 12 or 24 months before they can be made openly available. Fortunately, there is no embargo period on this paper, which has been open access since it was published in April 2016.

    This is one of the most recent papers from the Faculty of Engineering that is openly available in UCL Discovery. In last 12 months the manuscript was downloaded in 60 countries, and the highest number of downloads came from the United Kingdom (211), United States (180), and Germany (87).

    Automatic publication claiming in RPS

    By Patrycja A Barczynska, on 24 October 2017

    This year’s Open Access Week runs from 23-29 October under the theme “Open in order to…” This is an invitation to reflect on many benefits of making research publications openly available. We are excited to present a series of blog posts celebrating the Open Access Week, starting with the announcement of new RPS functionality that is now available to UCL authors.

    Most UCL researchers are used to the way Research Publications Service (RPS) searches external databases (like Scopus and Web of Science) to find publications that may belong to UCL authors, based on their search settings. By default, suggested publications are put in the pending publications list, where they can be manually reviewed and claimed (or rejected). Now, though, after a recent upgrade, RPS is even better at helping UCL authors record their publications.

    We are very excited about the latest upgrade to RPS that introduced new tool that helps authors to identify their papers: auto-claiming. More than 2,000 authors at UCL already use their ORCID in RPS, but UCL’s Research Publications Service can now find and claim even more papers, using even more identifiers including e-mail address. When RPS can tell that a paper belongs to the author, it claims it automatically.

    This new tool helps researchers to identify their papers and record them in RPS quickly, as it minimises number of publications that are sent to the pending list and need to be verified by authors. Now, all they need to do is to upload the final accepted manuscript for their research articles and conference proceedings, in compliance with the REF open access policy. Deposited manuscripts are then made openly available via UCL Discovery, UCL’s institutional repository (after a delay period, if publisher requires it).

    Authors can set RPS to automatically claim or reject their publications, if they contain any of the following identifiers:

    • e-mail addresses
    • arXiv Author Identifier
    • com account
    • ORCID ID
    • Researcher ID
    • Scopus ID
    • SSRN Author ID

    By default, the author’s UCL e-mail address is entered automatically, but other e-mail addresses used by researchers can be added.

    Another very useful aspect of this new RPS feature is automated rejection of publications based on an identifier. When authors declare that certain identifier is not theirs, all publications that include that identifier will be automatically rejected and no longer be offered to the user for verification. This is particularly useful for authors with common names, and minimises the number of publications that are sent to the author’s pending publication list.

    There is a guide explaining how to set up automated claiming available here, but if you have any questions about this or other aspects of RPS, please contact UCL Open Access Team at open-access@ucl.ac.uk

    Open Access Week 2017

    By Patrycja A Barczynska, on 23 October 2017

    The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) established International Open Access Week in 2008 in order to help open access advocates promote openness to scholarly publications. In 2017, its 10th year, hundreds of institutions are participating in this annual celebration around the world. This year’s Open Access Week runs from 23-29 October under the theme “Open in order to…” This theme is an invitation to think about many benefits of making research publications openly available.

    More and more researchers are aware of the importance of open access, not least because ever-increasing numbers of funders and institutions mandate it. The policy that affects all UCL researchers is the REF open access policy, which requires authors to deposit the final accepted manuscript of all research articles and conference proceedings in an open access repository in order to make them openly available (after a delay period, if publisher requires it).

    Open access has many benefits beyond compliance with institutional and funders’ requirements, and this year’s Open Access Week is an excellent opportunity for us to talk about those benefits! Openness is beneficial to authors and their institutions, with papers that are open access getting increased downloads and citations. And let’s not forget that open access is good for the readers also, be it other researchers or non-academic audiences without access to institutional subscriptions.

    This Open Access Week we will demonstrate the benefits of making publications open access in a series of blog posts that present examples of highly-downloaded items from UCL Discovery, UCL’s institutional repository. UCL Discovery is a long-established repository. Authors depositing their papers in UCL Discovery benefit from increased visibility of their work, as articles available there are downloaded hundreds of times in many countries across the globe.

    This week we will also announce very exciting changes in UCL’s Research Publication Service (RPS), recently upgraded to its latest version that includes automated claiming. This new function makes maintaining publications lists in the author’s RPS profile even easier and less time consuming.

    Institutions and authors are welcome to join the discussion about the benefits of openness. Do you make your research openly available in order to increase access to knowledge? Facilitate collaboration? Raise your research visibility? Whatever your answer, you can share it on Twitter, using #OpenInOrderTo, and see the whole conversation here. You can also follow the Open Access Week events at participating institutions online and on the ground here.