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UCL Plan S Town Hall meeting

By Catherine L Sharp, on 10 January 2019

Plan S requires that, from 2020, scientific publications that result from research funded by public grants must be published in compliant Open Access journals or platforms.

Plan S is an initiative for open access publishing that was launched in September 2018. The plan is supported by cOAlition S, an international consortium of research funders. This group currently comprises 13 national research funding organisations (including UK Research and Innovation/UK Research Councils) and three charitable foundations (including the Wellcome Trust and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation) from 13 countries. Together with the European Commission and the ERC, they have agreed to implement the 10 principles of Plan S in a coordinated way.

UCL held a Town Hall meeting on 8 January to discuss the principles of Plan S, as well as what its implementation will mean for researchers. Around 115 staff from across UCL attended. The Open Access Team would like to thank everyone who shared their views and questions.

Presentations from the meeting are now available:

Plan S: Making Open Access a Reality by 2020
Funders and Plan S
Plan S and Humanities Researchers
Implementing Plan S

cOAlition S is running a consultation on the Plan until 8 February 2019. You can contribute to the consultation directly. To arrange a meeting in your department to discuss the implications of Plan S, contact the Open Access Team at open-access@ucl.ac.uk.

 

 

 

 

RPS and the REF open access policy training sessions

By Patrycja A Barczynska, on 3 January 2019

In the new year we are back with our programme of regular training sessions on RPS and the REF open access policy.

All UCL authors are required to maintain a list of their publications in UCL’s Research Publication Service (RPS). To comply with the REF open access policy, they must also upload the final accepted manuscript version of their research articles and conference proceedings to RPS. This needs to be done no later than three months after first online publication. The Open Access Team review the manuscript and make it open access through UCL Discovery, UCL’s open access repository.

Our training sessions will explain the REF open access policy and what to do to comply with its requirements. They will also show you how to, in RPS:

  • set up name-based search settings
  • use all the advantages of RPS’s automated claiming tool (including linking RPS to your ORCID ID)
  • record a publication
  • upload a file

The sessions will be a good opportunity to ask questions about RPS and the REF open access policy, and they are open to all UCL staff and interested research students. New members of staff, and anyone who is unsure about any of the features mentioned above, are strongly encouraged to attend. Regular reports on compliance with the REF open access policy, and on academics’ use of RPS, are sent to Faculty Deans and Heads of Department. 

Upcoming sessions

Tuesday, 8th January, 11:00 – 12:00
Gordon House, room 309

Thursday, 24th January, 11:00 – 12:00
Engineering Front Building, room 104

To book, and if you have any questions, please email: open-access@ucl.ac.uk
Also let us know if you would like to organise group training or drop-in sessions in your department.

How to Share your FAIR Data – 25th October 2018

By Catherine L Sharp, on 26 October 2018

This week UCL hosted a series of events to coincide with International Open Access Week (22nd -28th October). The Research Data Management team were on hand to deliver a session on data sharing and the role it currently plays in the Open Science agenda. The session was divided into two parts. The first half introduced researchers to the importance and practical considerations of sharing data in keeping with the FAIR data principles. This was followed by a talk from Dr. Ben Thomas from the Institute of Nuclear Medicine who spoke of his experiences of using the EU-funded Zenodo repository to add a working example of data sharing to the session.

Many thanks to all those that attended and hopefully the session provided some useful information for researchers to further explore the merits of sharing research data.

The slides from the FAIR Data session can also be found on UCL Discovery, UCL’s open access repository and in SlideShare here.

Doctoral theses in UCL’s repository

By Patrycja A Barczynska, on 25 October 2018

At UCL, candidates for research degrees are required to deposit an electronic copy of their final thesis in UCL’s Research Publications Service (RPS), to be made open access in UCL’s institutional repository, UCL Discovery. Students can choose to restric public access to their thesis, for a variety of reasons like future publication, copyright restriction or sensitive data, but most are made open access immediately, or after a delay period no longer than 12 months.

The requirement to submit an electronic copy of your thesis as a condition of award has been in place at UCL since 2009. In addition to that, we have retrospectively digitised theses from earlier years, as a part of a collaborative project with ProQuest. So far, about 3,500 theses have been made available in UCL Discovery as a part of this collaboration. Theses are also digitised through the British Library’s e-Theses Online Service (EThOS), upon request.

In total, there are over 10,500 theses available in UCL’s institutional repository, dating as far back as 1933. UCL theses are amongst our most-downloaded items! The most popular is a 1990 thesis, Marketing theories and concepts for the international construction industry, available here. Amongst the theses available there are some completed by notable UCL alumni:

Julian Baggini, philosopher and author of popular books on philosophy, including A Short History of Truth, The Pig that Wants to be Eaten and 99 other thought experiments, and most recently How the World Thinks. Baggini completed his PhD in 1996, and his thesis on philopsphy of idnetity was recently made available here: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/10057733/

Adam Rutherford, geneticist and author, has produced several science documentaries, and hosts the BBC 4 radio programme Inside Science. He completed his PhD at UCL in 2002, and his thesis on the role of a specific gene (CHX10) on eye development was recently made available in UCL Discovery: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/10057801/

Chris Van Tulleken, together with his twin brother and fellow doctor Xand, makes programmes on various aspects of health, most recently Operation Ouch for CBBC. He is also an infectious diseases doctor and MRC Clinical Research Fellow at University College London Hospital, and completed his PhD in 2017. Chris’ thesis is available here: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1567969/

Open Access Week – REF and beyond!

By Catherine L Sharp, on 24 October 2018

It was great to see so many people, both academics and research support staff, at our REF and Open Access Lunch today. Thanks to Adam Cresswell, UCL’s REF Manager, for an in-depth look at how the REF submission is managed at UCL.

We hope that everyone enjoyed the event, and that you were inspired to think beyond REF compliance, and to make open access a priority for all your research.

The slides from this session are now available:

REF2021 overview for beginners

Open access – REF and beyond

 

Open Access Week starts here!

By Catherine L Sharp, on 22 October 2018

RPS and the REF open access policy training sessions – more dates

By Patrycja A Barczynska, on 18 October 2018

This academic year, UCL Open Access Team introduced a programme of regular training sessions on RPS and the REF open access policy. October dates proved very popular, and now we’ve added more sessions in November and early December.

All UCL authors are required to maintain a list of their publications in UCL’s Research Publication Service (RPS). To comply with the REF open access policy, they must also upload the final accepted manuscript version of their research articles and conference proceedings to RPS. This needs to be done no later than three months after first online publication. The Open Access Team review the manuscript and make it open access through UCL Discovery, UCL’s open access repository.

Our training sessions will explain the REF open access policy and what to do to comply with its requirements. They will also show you how to, in RPS:

  • set up name-based search settings
  • use all the advantages of RPS’s automated claiming tool (including linking RPS to your ORCID ID)
  • record a publication
  • upload a file

The sessions will be a good opportunity to ask questions about RPS and the REF open access policy, and they are open to all UCL staff and interested research students. New members of staff, and anyone who is unsure about any of the features mentioned above, are strongly encouraged to attend. Regular reports on compliance with the REF open access policy, and on academics’ use of RPS, are sent to Faculty Deans and Heads of Department. 

Upcoming sessions

Thursday, 1st November, 11:00 – 12:00
IOE, 20 Bedford Way, room W3.07

Tuesday, 6th November, 11:00 – 12:00
Foster Court, room 243

Tuesday, 20th November, 14:00 – 15:00
1-19 Torrington Place, room B09

Thursday, 6th December 11:00 – 12:00
1-19 Torrington Place, room B09

To book, and if you have any questions, please email: open-access@ucl.ac.uk
Also let us know if you would like to organise group training or drop-in sessions in your department.

Open Access Week 2018

By Patrycja A Barczynska, on 4 October 2018

The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) established International Open Access Week ten years ago, in 2008, to help open access advocates promote openness to scholarly publications. This year’s Open Access Week runs from 22nd to 28th October under the theme Designing Equitable Foundations for Open Knowledge. In preparation for open becoming the default for scholarly research, it’s important to make sure that open systems are inclusive, equitable, and meet the needs of diverse communities.

We are running a series of events for UCL staff during International Open Access Week. They will explore not only open access, and the REF open access policy that plays a huge role in shaping the open access landscape in the UK and at UCL, but they will also discuss other movements that aim to make research open, like open education and research data management.

Meeting of the UCL open education special interest group (SIG)

Start: Oct 23, 2018 11:30 
End: Oct 23, 2018 12:30

Location: Room 712, Maple House, 149 Tottenham Court Road, W1T 7NF

The theme for this special interest group meeting is ‘designing equitable foundations for open knowledge’, to which we are contributing towards through the open education (OE) project, the OER repository, and by shaping OE policy at UCL. We’ll talk about open education as a facet of open access, fill you in on the project’s activities, and discuss with colleagues across UCL. Join us and share your ideas!

RPS and the REF open access policy training session

Start: Oct 23, 2018 14:00 
End: Oct 23, 2018 15:00

Fully booked – contact UCL’s Open Access Team for November dates.

Location: Engineering Front Building, room 104

This training session will explain the REF open access policy and what to do to comply with its requirements. Using RPS, we will show you how to:

  • set up name-based search settings
  • use all the advantages of RPS’s automated claiming tool (including linking RPS to your ORCID ID)
  • record a publication
  • upload a file

This session will be a good opportunity to ask questions about RPS and the REF open access policy.

UCL REF and Open Access Lunch

Start: Oct 24, 2018 12:00 
End: Oct 24, 2018 13:30

Location: Institute of Advanced Studies (IAS) Common  Room

12:00 – Buffet lunch

12:15-12:45
REF for Absolute Beginners – Adam Cresswell, UCL REF Manager
Adam will explain what the REF is, how it works and what we do to make it happen at UCL.
This session will be particularly useful for administrators and members of staff who haven’t been involved in the REF before, but experienced staff will have the opportunity to ask questions about the RPS REF assessment module and the new REF submission guidance.

12:45-13:15
Open Access: REF and beyond – Catherine Sharp, Head of Open Access Services, UCL
Catherine will explain what academics need to do to comply with the REF open access policy, why it’s important and how to tell whether your papers meet the requirements. Academics and administrative staff will be able to ask questions about RPS and open access at UCL.
Catherine will also discuss the development of open access nationally and internationally beyond the REF, and how funders’ open access policies (including the UK Research Councils’) and the European Commission’s Plan S will affect academics in the future.

13:15-13:30 – Q&A

Booking via Eventbrite here.

The Work of the Open Access Team – training session for library staff

Start: Oct 25, 2018 10:00 
End: Oct 25, 2018 11:30

Location: IoE Library, Training room

This training session is for UCL Library staff who would like to find out more about work of the Open Access Team, open access in general, the REF open access policy, and the newest developments in scholarly communication. The session will explain research funders’ open access policies, the REF open access policy and how the Open Access Team helps UCL authors to comply with funders’ and REF requirements. The session will describe the work of the team and will take you through the team’s daily and weekly tasks.

If you would like to book contact the Library HR Team.

Screening of Paywall: the Business of Scholarship

Start: Oct 25, 2018 12:45 
End: Oct 25, 2018 13:50

Location: DMS Watson Science Library training room, 417 (fourth floor)

Paywall: The Business of Scholarship is a documentary which focuses on the need for open access to research and science, questions the rationale behind the $25.2 billion a year that flows into for-profit academic publishers, examines the 35-40% profit margin associated with the top academic publisher Elsevier and looks at how that profit margin is often greater than some of the most profitable tech companies like Apple, Facebook and Google.

Bring your lunch!

Booking via Eventbrite.

FAIR Data Sharing

Start: Oct 25, 2018 13:00 
End: Oct 25, 2018 14:00

Location: Institute of Advanced Studies (IAS) Common  Room

UCL’s Research Data Support team is running this lunchtime session on the most effective ways to share your research data.
The first half of the session will give researchers an introduction to the principles and practicalities involved in data sharing. It will also seek to outline the principles of FAIR data and how they relate to the production and use of data over the research lifecycle.
During the second half of the session the Research Data Management team will host a drop-in to help answer any questions about sharing research data.

Booking via Eventbrite.

RPS and REF open access policy training sessions

By Patrycja A Barczynska, on 27 September 2018

This academic year, UCL Open Access Team is introducing a programme of regular training sessions on RPS and the REF open access policy.

All UCL authors are required to maintain a list of their publications in UCL’s Research Publication Service (RPS). To comply with the REF open access policy, they must also upload the final accepted manuscript version of their research articles and conference proceedings to RPS. This needs to be done no later than three months after first online publication. The Open Access Team review the manuscript and make it open access through UCL Discovery, UCL’s open access repository.

Our training sessions will explain the REF open access policy and what to do to comply with its requirements. They will also show you how to, in RPS:

  • set up name-based search settings
  • use all the advantages of RPS’s automated claiming tool (including linking RPS to your ORCID ID)
  • record a publication
  • upload a file

The sessions will be a good opportunity to ask questions about RPS and the REF open access policy, and they are open to all UCL staff and interested research students. New members of staff, and anyone who is unsure about any of the features mentioned above, are strongly encouraged to attend. Regular reports on compliance with the REF open access policy, and on academics’ use of RPS, are sent to Faculty Deans and Heads of Department. 

Upcoming sessions

Tuesday, 9th October, 14:00 – 15:00
Engineering Front Building, room 104

Tuesday, 16th October, 12:00 – 13:00
IOE, 20 Bedford Way, room W2.06

Tuesday, 23rd October, 10:00 – 11:00
Engineering Front Building, room 104

To book, and if you have any questions, please email: open-access@ucl.ac.uk
Also let us know if you would like to organise group training or drop-in sessions in your department.

 

Introducing UCL’s open education initiative

By Patrycja A Barczynska, on 29 August 2018

Today, C. Yogeswaran from UCL’s Open Educational Resources (OER) project writes about open education at UCL.

What is open education?

Open education, like open access and open data, centres on a commitment to provide access to high quality education and educational resources to a global audience.

As the Open Education Consortium declares, “sharing is probably the most basic characteristic of education: education is sharing knowledge, insights and information with others, upon which new knowledge, skills, ideas and understanding can be built”.

Open education typically involves the creation and sharing of openly-licensed learning materials – open educational resources (OER) – that can be re-used and enhanced by the community. OER can include lesson and course plans, exercises, diagrams, animations, video or audio lecture recordings, presentations, handouts, mock papers/tests, reading lists, and so on.

There is also alignment with open scholarship, open science, and open society ideals which foster communication between academia and the public. It also inspires new ways of undertaking education by removing (economic, geographic, and other) barriers to usage, allowing anyone with an Internet connection to use published OER.

How is research relevant to open education?

Research papers, when openly published, can be used not only for further research, but also as a basis for teaching, providing practical, current, and tangible content to tackle discipline-specific questions.

Curating and packaging research-based studies, which include additional descriptive and support documents such as workbooks and educational guidelines, allows for focused and supported reuse for teaching. 

Such research-based OER can be used to teach research methods and, once embedded, can give students real-world and practical tools to learn with and use for inter-disciplinary study, increasing the use and impact of research.

Why share educational materials?

Publishing teaching/training resources (which can include student-generated content) will have wider global reach and impact, and attributing the UCL brand to your output should provide quality assurance for other users.

Published OER can be cited and referenced by others and can be included in publications (tying into the Academic Promotions Framework, which rewards open behaviours, for example), adding value to teaching and research, and raising professional reputation.

What are the benefits?

While the initial creation of educational materials from published research outputs can require some consideration, sharing these will allow the creators to promote good practise, collaborate with other educators and learners, and respond to UCL promotional criteria that require publication of educational materials.

There is some evidence that re-using high-quality OER is a time- and cost-saving activity, as one can edit existing educational materials to make content specific to a programme or class. OER use can also provide the chance to learn in different ways, i.e. a flipped classroom, and insight into the research-based teaching approaches of fellow practitioners in another field might lead to collaboration, inspire teaching and research, or contribute to original output.

Showcasing student content and feedback is also a great way to demonstrate the outcomes of teaching/training, promote courses for prospective students, and engage students in the publishing process.

Getting involved and learning more

If you have any content you would like to upload to the repository or if you require further information, please contact the OER team at oer@ucl.ac.uk who will be happy to support you.

To find out more about open education or to contribute to this practice at UCL, ask to join the mailing list by emailing  oer@ucl.ac.uk, or attend the next meeting of the open education special interest group (SIG). This will be held on Tuesday 11 September 2018 11am-12pm in room 712, Maple House.

We will also be present at RDM/RITS drop-in sessions if you’d like to talk to us or learn more about creating OER from your research data. Information about upcoming SIG meetings and RDM/RITS drop-in sessions can be found here.

More information about the project is available on the OER website, or you can follow us on Twitter @OpenUCL.