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  • Archive for the 'Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology' Category

    Divorce, Adultery and Revenge: an alternate Valentine’s Day

    By Edmund Connolly, on 14 February 2014

    Valentine’s Day can be an arduous 24 hours of franchised affection and a reminder that being single is not socially commendable.  To play the merry dissenter, and offer those of you who are not a fan of the day, I will celebrate 4 archaeological heroes who flew in the face of Valentine’s lucid message and offer a far more commendable representation of love.

    A rather intimate cupid and Jupiter by Raimondi. UCl Art Museum 1684

    A rather intimate Cupid and Jupiter by Raimondi. UCl Art Museum 1684

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    Pondering Petrie’s Pots

    By Alice E Stevenson, on 4 February 2014

    When you think about ancient Egypt what comes to mind? Plenty of things beginning with the letter ‘P’ no doubt: Pyramids! Pharaohs! Papyrus! Maybe even Petrie. But Pottery?…

    Grumpy pots in the Petrie

    Grumpy po[u]ts in the Petrie

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    The journey of a 3D model into interactive applications.

    By Giancarlo Amati, on 2 February 2014

    Photogrammetry and laser scanning are 3D imaging technologies that can generate very accurate 3D models of real objects. These techniques represent the object in the form of a very dense point-cloud dataset that can be several megabytes big. In order to use a 3D model in interactive applications, the point-cloud dataset has to be processed and transformed into another model which is smaller in file-size but with the same aesthetic features of the original one.

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    Festival of Pots

    By Edmund Connolly, on 24 January 2014

    by guest blogger: Helen Pike

     The Festival of Pots has kicked off with some Ace pots being made by a year 6 school group from Chris Hatton based in Camden –

    These and many other examples of work by a range of community based groups attached to Holborn Community Association have been produced in the last few weeks as part of a 6 month Festival of Pots here at The Petrie.

    One of our school-made pots

    One of our school-made pots

    Sir William Matthew Flinders Petrie an English Egyptologist and a pioneer of systematic methodology in archaeology and preservation of artefacts is a character in history who himself needs excavating.

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    Cairo, Camden and the Cape

    By Edmund Connolly, on 17 January 2014

    by guest blogger: Alice Stevenson
    The logistics of dispersal: one of the documents managing the distribution of object from the 1913 excavations at Tarkhan to the World's Museums. Courtesy of the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, UCL.

    The logistics of dispersal: one of the documents managing the distribution of object from the 1913 excavations at Tarkhan to the World’s Museums. Courtesy of the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, UCL.

    I’ve recently returned from a holiday in South Africa where I had to the chance to not only thoroughly ‘research’ the winelands, but also to explore some collections of ancient Egyptian artefacts excavated by Petrie and his teams that now reside in the Western Cape. Following each field season, after a share of the finds had been retained by Egypt, the harvest of discoveries was crated up and dispersed to those museums across the world that had sponsored the expeditions. Archives in the Petrie Museum record this exodus and list destinations as far flung as Japan, New Zealand and Canada.  One terminus includes what is now the South African Cultural History Museum, which forms part of IZIKO, Museums of Cape Town

     

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    Petrie in Britain: The Stonehenge years

    By Edmund Connolly, on 14 January 2014

    Flinders Petrie is most famous for his extensive work in Egypt, but one of his first archaeological projects was far closer to home and took place in Wiltshire. England plays host to many iconic heritage institutions and monuments, but perhaps the most recognisable is a ring of stones that have beguiled archaeologists, historians and tourists for millennia.
    Petrie's Stonehenge survey

    Petrie’s Stonehenge survey

     
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    Lighting up the Petrie Museum

    By Edmund Connolly, on 13 January 2014

    Guest blogger: Pia Edqvist

    As people might have realized, the Petrie Museum is currently closed throughout January and February. But why is the Museum closed? The Museum is currently undertaking essential lighting works; the whole museum is getting new lighting including; spot and overhead lights but also new lighting within the display cases. This means that the collection will be better lit and a more environmentally-friendly system will be installed which will also ensure greater conservation-protection for the collection. We are also hoping that the new lighting system will improve the visitor’s experience of the collection. Further enhancements of the display are also planned during this period such as to improve the mounting of objects.

    The Pottery being packed up

    The Pottery being packed up

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    So long fair thee well, pip pip cheerio, We’ll be back soon…

    By Edmund Connolly, on 20 December 2013

    Following the wise Dickensian ( /Lionel Bart) sentiment this will be the final blog post from the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology for 2013 and we will be closed until March 2014 to have a fulgurating new light system installed. Despite the museum being closed, the collection is still active. We have a plethora of events and activities going on across campus and Camden, with further details here that will be leading towards a large summer celebration, something to look forward to after the excitement of Christmas.

    We can also be followed online via twitter: @PetrieMuseEgypt and on our shiny new facebook page: Excavating Objects: Behind the scenes at the Petrie Museum or, if pictures are more your thing follow our instagram where we have a host of images of objects and events that show what a vibrant and diverse museum we are: @Petriemuseum

    A small summary of our year:

    VP Michael Worton presenting Ramdane Kamal with his graduation certificate, September 2013

    VP Michael Worton presenting Ramdane Kamal with his graduation certificate, September 2013

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    Back to Ancients/Basics

    By Edmund Connolly, on 13 December 2013

    by guest blogger: Helen Pike

    Feeling the stress of Christmas, blitzed out on overpriced gaudy baubles, one too many festive drinks on the calendar, need a restorative notion …. then take a tour round the Petrie museum this December time and contemplate a more ancient approach to soothe your furrowed brows…

    Why not deck the halls with thoughts of the Amarna temple wall tiles

    A colourful array of Amarna tiles. Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology

    A colourful array of Amarna tiles. Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology

    These tiles were found at Amarna capital of the heretic Pharaoh Akenaten with his missus the renowned beauty Nefertiti -who both knew a thing or two about decoration preferring to chuck out the chintz if you like and gods of previous dynasties and bring in a revolution in terms of artistic production and new idols – the sprit of Aten. The tiles in the Petrie collection are exquisite in terms colour and pattern and conjure up what must have been a spectacular wall covering in the temple. Take a leaf out of the master of sun worship and reinvent your home your own way this Christmas with a new take on décor and not be swayed by the gaudy baubles out there… (more…)

    Egypt on the Page: The Changing faces of Religion

    By Edmund Connolly, on 6 December 2013

    The ever popular and ever sold out (although some tickets left for the 13th December screening) Petrie Film club chronicles the application of Egypt in just some of the many cinematic and TV masterpieces that have turned to pyramids, mummies and anthropomorphic deities for their stimuli. Moving pictures are all very well, but I am a bookish type and prefer the idea of lounging by a fire with some sort of paged item, reading away. Terry Pratchett’s Pyramids certainly struck a chord with me, considering it in relation to the Petrie Collection and the concept of Ancient Egyptian religion and the changes it underwent.

    Pratchett, Pyramids (1989)  copyright: amazon.co.uk

    Pratchett, Pyramids (1989) copyright: amazon.co.uk

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