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Archive for the 'UCL' Category

New books at the Ear Institute Library

By Gareth L Jones, on 24 July 2018

Summer has brought a bumper delivery of new books to the libraries, and in this post I would like to bring to your attention the new titles to be found in the Ear Institute collection.
First I’d like to whet your appetites with some of the titles that caught my eye during processing. A full list of books will follow.

Basic Otorhinolaryngology

Basic Otorhinolaryngology, Second Edition, Thieme 2018, by Rudolf Probst, Gerhard Grevers and Heinrich Iro. Located at WV 100 PRO.
An accessible introduction to the core concepts of otorhinolaryngology and head and neck surgery. Completely updated chapters on audiology and vestibular disorders.

 

 

 

 

Clinical Reference Guides

Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Clinical Reference Guide, Fifth Edition, Plural 2018, by Raza Pasha, Justin S Golub. Located at WV 100 PAS.
Rhinology and Allergy Clinical Reference Guide, Plural 2018, by Brent A Senior, Yvonne Chan. Located at WV 300 SEN.
Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Clinical Reference Guide, Plural 2017, by Shaun S Desai. Located at WE 705.600 DES.

An update for the Pasha pocket guide, and new titles in a similar format for two other disciplines.

 

Scary Cases in Otolaryngology

Scary Cases in Otolaryngology, Plural 2017, by Michael P Platt, Kenneth M Grundfast. Located at WV 150 PLA.

Arriving too early for Halloween, nonetheless Scary Cases could be an invaluable resource, presenting difficult cases and building a discussion around clinical management, prevention, and the legal and ethical aspects of these cases. An extension of the annual Scary Cases Conference held by the Bostion University School of Medicince since 2011.

 

 

 

SataloffClinical Assessment of Voice, Second Edition, Plural 2017, by Robert Thayer Sataloff. Located at WV 500 SAT.
Treatment of Voice Disorders, Second Edition, Plural 2017, by Robert Thayer Sataloff. Located at WV 500 SAT.
Vocal Health and Pedagogy, Third Edition, Plural 2017, by Robert Thayer Sataloff. Located at WV 500 SAT.
Voice Science, Second Edition, Plural 2017, by Robert Thayer Sataloff. Located at WV 500 SAT.

Dr. Sataloff and his band of authors have been extremely productive of late, providing new editions of his voice books. These feature numerous updates to previous editions, reflecting changes in medicine and voice science.

 

SPSS Survival GuideSPSS Survival Manual, Sixth Edition, McGraw-Hill 2016, by Julie Pallant. Located at WA 950 PAL.

A lifeline for students and researchers grappling with SPSS statistics software, this sixth edition is fully revised to accomodate changes to IBM SPSS. My personally-favoured choice for library users asking for SPSS advice!

 

 

 

Springer Handbook of Odor

Springer Handbook of Odor, Springer 2017, edited by Andrea Buettner. Located at WV 301 BUE.

Unfortunately not available in a scratch-and-sniff edition, this is the definitive guide to all aspects related to the study of smell and their impact in human life.

 

 

 

 

Here is the full list of books processed in July 2018.

SPSS survival manual Pallant WA 950 PAL
Advanced technologies for the rehabilitation of gait and balance disorders Sandrini WE 103 SAN
Clinical facial analysis Meneghini WE 705 MEN
Skull base surgery of the posterior fossa Couldwell WE 705.500 COU
Facial plastic and reconstructive surgery Desai WE 705.600 DES
Practical facial reconstruction Kaufman WE 705.600 KAU
Facial plastic surgery Larrabee WE 705.600 LAR
Facial reconstruction after Mohs surgery Thornton WE 705.600 THO
Head, neck, and dental emergencies Perry WE 706 PER
Contemporary management of jugular paraganglioma Wanna WE 707 WAN
Tracheostomy De Farias WF 490 DEF
Gland-preserving salivary surgery Gillespie WI 230 GIL
Dysphagia Leonard WI 250 LEO
Atlas of head and neck endocrine disorders Giovanella WK 250 GIO
Reoperative parathyroid surgery Tufano WK 300 TUF
Skull base cancer imaging Yu WN 180 Yu
Atlas of postsurgical neuroradiology Ginat WN 200 GIN
Head and Neck Ultrasonography Orloff WN 208 ORL
Otolaryngology head and neck surgery Pasha WV 100 PAS
Basic otorhinolaryngology Probst WV 100 PRO
Atlas of topographical Seagal WV 101 SEA
Infections of the ears, nose, throat, and sinuses Durand WV 140 DUR
Scary cases Platt WV 150 PLA
Robotic head and neck surgery Goldenberg WV 168.162 GOL
Robotics and digital guidance in ENT – H&N surgery Lombard WV 168.162 LOM
Temporal bone histology and radiology atlas Chandrasekhar WV 201 CHA
The temporal bone Piras WV 201 PIR
Tinnitus and stress Szczepek WV 272 SZC
Temporal bone cancer Gidley WV 290 GID
Rhinology and allergy Senior WV 300 SEN
Springer handbook of odor Buettner WV 301 BUE
Mastering advanced rhinoplasty Gubisch WV 312 GUB
Rhinoplasty Rollin WV 312 ROL
Endoscopic sinus surgery Wormald WV 340.505 WOR
The power of the voice Abitbol WV 500 ABI
Measuring voice, speech, and swallowing Ludlow WV 500 LUD
Voice disorders Sapienza WV 500 SAP
Clinical assessment of voice Sataloff WV 500 SAT
Treatment of voice disorders Sataloff WV 500 SAT
Vocal health and pedagogy Sataloff WV 500 SAT
Voice science Sataloff WV 500 SAT
Neurolaryngology Sittel WV 500 SIT
Speech and Voice Science Behrman WV 501 BEH
Anatomy and physiology of speech and hearing Rousseau WV 501 ROU
Functional histoanatomy of the human larynx Sato WV 501 SAT

“The difficulty with which she then spoke on her fingers … added to her power of expression” Jessie E. Beatrice Ruddock

By H Dominic W Stiles, on 7 April 2017

It is not always easy to find women with a connection to Deaf history until the late 19th and early 20th century.  Before that, it seems to me, men predominated in both deaf education and in Deaf society and institutions.  Jessie Eva Beatrice Ruddock was one of the young women who changed that in the early decades of the 20th century.

Born in St. Margaret’s on Thames (Isleworth) on the 19th of June, 1889, Jessie was the daughter of a civil servant, Montague Grevile Ruddock (already retired in 1891 aged only 52), and his wife Amy.  Jessie was educated at a private school, South Croydon College, and then when her family moved into London, she attended a school in Kensington (Fry, 1913, from which most of the following comes).  She then had an attack of influenza aged thirteen,

which left inflammation of both ears, necessitating mastoid operations, and causing a total loss of her hearing.  For three weary years Miss Ruddock lay very ill, cared for by a noble mother and sister. Few can imagine the agony of mind experienced by her and her relatives when, after being unconscious for twelve days, it began to dawn on her that the song of the nightingale across the road in Kew Gardens would know her not.  The trilling of these beautiful songstresses had previously been her delight.* (ibid)

Her education seemed over, but aged seventeen a friend suggested a career in dispensing.  I wonder if her father had retired early through ill-health as  the children all seem to have gone into some form of employment, and after her father’s death in 1909 her mother ran a boarding house in Kew.

miss ruddockJessie contacted a Dr. Farrar, who offered to coach her, saying her deafness should be no handicap to the work of a dispenser.  Fry tell us that she attended the college, which is now the UCL School of Pharmacy, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. then studied at home until 10 p.m.  “It was jolly at the College; between fifteen and twenty ladies were there, and we attended lectures twice a day.  My chief difficulty was in pronouncing Latin and botanical names.” (ibid)  Of 150 candidates, only 23 passed, including Jessie.  She held three appointments, with a private doctor, at the Royal Maternity Charity of London Outpatients’ Department, and All Saints’ Hospital.  Fry continues, “She yearned for other fields to conquer, however, and ultimately began a course of training as a nurse at Her Majesty’s Hospital, Stepney.”  That ended unfortunately when her father became ill and she gave up work.

In 1913, Maxwell S. Fry wrote an article on Miss J. E. Beatrice Ruddock, for The British Deaf Times.  In 1910 she had written to the secretary of the National Deaf Club, having read about it in the newspapers.  She wished to know if ladies were admitted.  This caused the creation of a ladies section to the club.

Fry was obviously so taken with Miss Ruddock that he really laid it on in his article, recording his impressions when they first met in 1910/11:

Miss Ruddock is lithe of figure, quiet, pleasant and refined.  The difficulty with which she then spoke on her fingers – having scarcely mastered our language – added to her power of expression.

[…]

This brilliant and gifted young lady possesses a delicate sensibility, and a quick perception.  She is one who grasps the significance that lies beneath the surface of things apparently insignificant, and realises the splendour often hidden in simple lives.  Very intelligent, she is possessed of keen instinct.  Rich in so many natural gifts, she might have become a scholar.  withal, it is the unconscious in her that counts.

It must have worked as, dear reader, he married her in 1915, and they had two daughters, Mary Eileen (b.1920), and Kathleen (b.1917).

We also learn from the article that she enjoyed cycling, had played the piano, and went with her brother to watch Fulham play football.  Jessie (or Beatrice as she now seems to have preferred) and her husband later lived in Coventry.  Maxwell Stewart Fry, who deserves a blog post of his own, died in 1943.  I am sure there is much more that could be added about her.  She died aged 90, on the 7th of January, 1980.**

[Note that the 1911 census does not describe here as ‘deaf’.  Also, in the 1891 and 1901 censuses she was named as Jessie Ruddock, but after her father’s death she has become Beatrice in the 1911 census.]

*Fry got the the nightingale sex wrong – as with many songbirds, males sing to impress females as well as establishing territory, e.g. Multiple song features are related to paternal effort in common nightingales

** Thanks, yet again, to Norma McGilp!

Obituary. Late Mr Maxwell Fry, Coventry.  The British Deaf Times, vol 41, 1944, p.9

Fry, M.S., Prominent in the Deaf World.  Miss J.E. Beatrice Ruddock. The British Deaf Times, 1913 p.160-1

1891 Census – Class: RG12; Piece: 1026; Folio: 131; Page: 41; GSU roll: 6096136

1901 Census – Class: RG13; Piece: 50; Folio: 17; Page: 25

1911 Census – Class: RG14; Piece: 3594; Schedule Number: 109

The early NID Technical Department, Dennis B. Fry and Péter B. Dénes of UCL

By H Dominic W Stiles, on 23 December 2016

UCL has had an association with the RNID/Action on Hearing Loss Library since the early 1990s when the library moved into the Royal National Throat Nose and Ear Hospital alongside the then Institute of Laryngology Library.  However there is a much older association between UCL and what was then the NID.

Giant hearing Aid War time developments in electronics ushered in an era when mass hearing aids would be small enough to be convenient to carry around, and cheap enough for the state to introduce the Medresco hearing aid supplied by the new NHS from 1948.  The previous year the transistor had been unveiled by Bell labs in the US, an invention that would change the world.

For many years the NID had been concerned over the quality of hearing aids and they way they were marketed to the public.  They worked with manufacturers and suppliers to create an agreement whereby the supplier made no claims about curing deafness, as had often been the case with quack sellers, and broadly to not bully clients into buying unwanted devices.  They also created an approved list of suppliers who signed up to the agreement.  This was a slightly tortuous process, and for those interested a visit to the library to read NID minutes would be essential.  The list is attached here: NID approved list

Anechoic ChamberIn 1947 The NID set up a technical department, at the behest of the Medical Committee (Annual Report, 1947 p.9).  At the time they were in 105 Gower Street, and did not have facilities, so initially UCL helped out, and Dennis Butler Fry (1907-84) led the efforts to establish testing to show the ‘technical characteristics and qualities of the various hearing aids’ which were available, and then publish this scientific information to the public (Denes & Fry p.304).

Fry was born on the 3rd of November, 1907, in Stockbridge, Hampshire, son of Fred Cornelius Fry and Jane Ann Butler.

After five years of teaching French, first at Tewkesbury Grammar School and then at Kilburn Grammar School, in 1934 he was appointed Assistant Lecturer in Phonetics at University College London, where he also became Superintendent of the Phonetics Laboratory in 1937.  In 1938 he was promoted to Lecturer in Experimental Phonetics. In 1948, the year after the award of his Ph.D. degree, he became Reader in Experimental Phonetics.  From 1958 until his retirement in 1975, he was Professor of Experimental Phonetics, the first one to hold the title in Britain. (Obituary for Dennis Butler Fry, Arthur S. Abramson

The 1947 annual report records that with the co-operation of Sir David Pye, UCL provost and mechanical engineer who worked on jet engines during the war, they were setting up a special sound-proof room, and that technical staff would be trained at the college, all under the supervision of Fry.  Fry had served in the RAF during the war, at the Acoustics Research Laboratory, Central Medical Establishment, at Kelvin House, 24-32 Cleveland Street, London.  Together with his colleague Péter B. Dénes (1920-96), a Hungarian phonetician who became a British citizen, but spent much of his later working life in the USA.  The books of Fry and Dénes (usually written Denes) on phonetics are still in use today.  Fry founded the journal Speech and Language in 1958. He wrote two books with Edith Whetnall (they are pictured together below), The Deaf Child, and Learning to Hear.

Denes had left Hungary in the 1930s and studied first at Manchester, before moving to UCL where he worked with Fry.  In 1961 he went to the USA on the Queen Mary to work at the Bell Labs (1996 obituary, see link below).  In his obituary, Michael Noll says,

Although Hungarian by birth, Peter was very much British by citizenship and personality. His knowledge of European history and views on events in America led to many lively discussions with his many friends and colleagues. Peter chose to remain a subject of the Queen of England, but he also chose to live in the United States.

The room in the basement of 105 was eventually fitted out for technical testing, along with the anechoic chamber.  In those days the road traffic would not have been as bad as now, and I suspect it would not have been possible to use it today, because of vibrations.  The first technician seems to have been Mr W.J. Markwick, who is mentioned in the 1950 annual report (p.33).  The Technical department became one of the most important areas for the NID in the following decade.

I am sure this would be an interesting area for research.  Denes and Fry were both interesting people who made significant contributions to speech and language research.

Fry Whetnall

Denes, P. and Fry, D.B. An Introduction to the NID Technical Research Laboratory

NID Annual Reports

Abramson, Arthur S. Obituary for Dennis Butler Fry. Speech Communication Volume 3, Issue 2, August 1984, Pages 167-168

http://www.phon.ucl.ac.uk/home/wells/fry-obit.htm

Noll, Michael, Acoust. Soc. Am., Vol. 100, No. 4, Pt. 1, October 1996, p.1916 http://asa.scitation.org/doi/pdf/10.1121/1.417840

Maintaining Current Awareness with Journals

By H Dominic W Stiles, on 7 October 2016

By Ed Lyon

UCL subscribes to 50,000 electronic journals, and a wide range of journals received only in print format.  There are dozens of journals which publish in the fields of audiology and otorhinolaryngology – it can be very difficult to monitor these journals for developments and maintain one’s current awareness: but it need not be.  There are several tools which can help you keep up to date.

At the most basic levels are things like Google Scholar alerts, requiring a Google account which is easy to set up.  These however bring you rather variable results.  You can put in terms you’re interested in, such as “cochlear implant”, and make more complex searches, e.g. “cochlear implant” and author:waltzmann.  This type of search is better than nothing but, depending on the terms used, may return a great deal of dross for every result of interest.

More useful material can be achieved through running regular searches through Medline.  To do this you need to create an account, design and input your search and adjust the update settings. This is not as onerous a task as it sounds, but Medline uses medical subject headings – MeSH – which can be confusing when you first encounter them. Please call in or contact us and we will talk you through the steps.

Most journal websites allow you to set up alerts to receive electronic tables of contents.  This can be a useful way of keeping up to date, but does rely on your seeing and acting on the emails.  If you receive a lot of emails these may be missed.

However, UCL has a subscription to Browzine, which can be accessed through the Library website.  Go to http://metalib.ucl.ac.uk/V/?func=find-db-1-title&mode=titles&scan_start=b&search_type=start&restricted=all and scroll down; you will need your UCL username and password if using it offsite.UCL jnls 1

This search for ‘audiology’ has turned up a number of journals, e.g. ‘Audiology and Neuro-Otology’: and two subjects, audiology and rehabilitative audiology. These expand to reveal a further range of journals:UCL jnls 2

You can add journals to a virtual bookshelf after creating an account, and then return to Browzine.  You can see a video about it here:

 

Masters in Language Sciences (with specialisation in Sign Language Studies) at DCAL

By H Dominic W Stiles, on 22 May 2013

UCL’s DCAL is offering an MSc in Sign Language. There is a scholarship available – applications before 1st June – and course applications have to be in by August.

The MSc in Language Sciences is an umbrella degree that provides students with an opportunity for the in-depth study of one or more areas of the Language Sciences. The new strand on Sign Language Studies complements three existing specialisation strands: language development, linguistics with neuroscience, and speech and hearing sciences.
 Students take a set of mandatory modules and have the opportunity to specialise in one specific area of the language sciences through the selection of core and optional modules, and a research project.

To see details look here –
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/dcal/msc_sign_lg_studies