UCL Centre for Law and Environment
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    UK Environmental Law Association and BREXIT

    By Centre for Law and Environment , on 13 January 2017

     

    BREXIT represenUKELA_logots a major challenge for the future of UK Environmental Law.  Professor Richard Macrory has been appointed co-chair of the UK Environmental Law Association’s Brexit Task Force – its immediate task is examining how EU environmental law has been integrated into the national system, and the extent to which the “Great Repeal Bill” (expected in May) is able, in the interests of legal stability,  to achieve its objectives of rolling over EU law until the opportunity is taken for review and reform.

     

    UCL lunch hour lectures

    By Centre for Law and Environment , on 11 January 2017

    Centre members Professor Joanne Scott and Professor Maria Lee are both giving a UCL lunch hour lecture this term, watch in person or online, http://events.ucl.ac.uk/calendar/tab:lunch_hour_lectures/

    Offshore wind turbinesTuesday 31 January, Joanne Scott, ‘The Global Reach of EU Law’

    Tuesday 28 February, Maria Lee, ‘Knowledge and law: exploring landscape in the context of wind energy’

    1.15-2pm, Darwin Lecture Theatre

    Carbon Capture and Storage – IEA Meeting

    By Centre for Law and Environment , on 7 December 2016

    Experts from round the world attended the annual meeting of the CSS Regulatory Network held in Paris at the end of November. The meeting, the eighth in the series organized by the International Energy Agency, provided a forum for comparingunnamed regulatory and policy developments in carbon capture and storage. Mainly for financial reasons, CCS has largely stalled in Europe, but this year’s meeting was marked by a strong presence from China, Indonesia, and Japan.

    Professor Macrory chaired one of the international sessions sessions and was respondent on the session exploring liability issues. Another core participant was Ian Havercroft, formerly coordinator of the UCL Carbon Capture Legal Programme, and now based at the Global Carbon Capture Storage Institute in Australia where he is Global Lead – Legal and Regulatory.

     

    Further details :  https://www.iea.org/workshops/8th-ccs-regulatory-network-meeting.html

    Italian Environmental sanctions conference

    By Centre for Law and Environment , on 6 December 2016

    Professor Macrory was a key note speaker at a conference on November 28th held in Milan on environmental enforcement and sanctions. The conference,imgres Environmental Law Regulation: Dealing Complexity by Complexity was organized by University Bocconi. Edward Ruggeri, a former UCL LLM student, and now working as a practitioner in Milan, was one of the respondents.

    Brexit and Environmental Law

    By Centre for Law and Environment , on 27 October 2016

    On 26 October Professor Maria Lee, director of the Centre, and Professor Macrory were invited to give evidence to the House of Laws EU Sub-committee on Energy and the Environment. together with Professor Andrew Jordan of the University of East Anglia. The sub-committee is holding a short inquiry  explorinselectg the future of environment and climate change policy following the vote to leave the European Union.  The session explored a broad range of issues including the Great Repeal Bill, the possible implications on UK environmental law depending on different models of exit, enforcement issues, and the future role of international environmental law within the UK.   A video of the session can be found at http://parliamentlive.tv/Event/Index/9bf1e256-4143-4ec6-b8f9-05fadf1f54e1

    All the written evidence and transcripts  of the oral evidence is now published : Brexit-Environment-Climate-Change-Written-Oral-Evidence-Volume 2

    Professor Macrory was asked to provide a supplementary note on the challenges of ensuring a ‘roll-over’ of EU environmental legislation once EU laws no longer has independent legal force in the UK  :  House of Lords Macrory supplementary note 2

     

     

    UCL Centre for Law and the Environment, Briefing 2015-16

    By Tatjana I N Wingender, on 20 October 2016

    UCL’s Centre for Law and Environment was established to provide a focal point for the Faculty’s outstanding expertise and academic strength in the field of the environment and the law. The main goals of the Centre are to advance research and teaching and explore the role of law in meeting contemporary environmental and energy challenges. Have a look at what we’ve been doing over the past year and download our Briefing document.

    UCL Energy and Development Group

    By Centre for Law and Environment , on 14 September 2016

    GroupPhoto20Jun2016In 2015, a number of UCL academics working on energy access challenges in the global South began meeting informally to discuss common research interests.  Now a team of about 16 from the UCL Energy Institute, Civil, Environmental and Geomatic Engineering (CEGE), Institute for Sustainable Resources (ISR), Science, Technology, Engineering and Public Policy (STEaPP), Development Planning Unit (DPU), Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Centre for Law and Environment, and other departments are meeting regularly as the “UCL Energy and Development Group”. The group is working together to build both a community of practice and to access research funds.  The team is already working on a research paper, has established a wide view of the relevant capability and capacity across UCL, and has served as a hub which has enabled several responses to large consultancy opportunities with valuable research and impact outcomes. The coordinator for the group is Dr Long-Seng To, Research Fellow at STEaPP (second from the left in the photo). Please contact her or Centre for Law and Environment member Ben Milligan to learn more or to join.

    Annual Lecture 2016

    By Centre for Law and Environment , on 30 August 2016

    Offshore wind turbines

    Local Publics and Offshore Wind Farms: constructing evidence in nationally significant infrastructure planning

    Tuesday 11 October 2016, 18:00 – 19:00

    Speaker: Professor Yvonne Rydin (UCL Barlett School of Planning)
    Chair: Professor Maria Lee (UCL Laws)

    About the lecture:

    The regulation of offshore wind farms and other major renewable energy infrastructure provides an opportunity to examine the processes put in place by the Planning Act 2008. There has been little research on the operation of the Nationally Significant Infrastructure Projects (NSIPs) regime to date and an ESRC-funded project (Rydin, Lee, Lock and Natarajan No. 164522) is currently filling this gap. The project focuses particularly on how local publics are involved and their representations constructed – or not – as evidence. In this lecture, research on the NSIPs regime, based on detailed reading of extensive documentation, supplemented with on-going interviews, focus groups and attendance at hearings, will be used to show how science and technology studies (STS) offers insights into how the voice of local publics is constructed, the way that knowledge claims are recognised as evidence, and the role that material artefacts play in the hearings and deliberations.

    About the speaker:

    Yvonne Rydin has been at UCL since 2006. Before that she was at the LSE in the Department of Geography and Environment for 16 years. Prior to that she taught at the University of East London (Departments of Applied Economics and Land Mangement) and De Montfort University (School of Land and Building Studies). Yvonne has a BA in Land Economy (with Economics Part 1) and a PhD in Urban and Regional Planning Studies. She is a member of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors and an accredited Mediator.

    Register your place:
    https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/local-publics-and-offshore-wind-farms-registration-26756032012

    Research on Environmental Compliance

    By Centre for Law and Environment , on 29 July 2016

    Richard Macrory has been expert adviser and written the guest editorial for the latest thematic issue of the European Commission’special-issue-thematics Science for Environmental Policy series. Issue 56 (July 2016) entitled Environmental Compliance Assurance and Combatting Environmental Crime summarizes fourteen recently  published research papers from across the world, and covers such topics as the value of emerging networks of enforcement bodies, opportunities for exploiting new technologies to assist detection of regulatory breaches , the use of appropriate sanctions and the added value of a compliance assurance conceptual framework. The work for this issue was coordinated by the Science Communication Unit of the University of the West of England.  For a full copy of the Issue see the Science for Environmental Policy web-site.

    http://ec.europa.eu/environment/integration/research/newsalert/index_en.htm

     

    Paris Agreement on Climate Change – Its Legal Implications

    By Centre for Law and Environment , on 21 June 2016

    logoProfessor Macrory was key note speaker at a meeting organized in Brussels by the European Environmental Advisory Councils on 17 June to discuss the legal implications of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change. The EEAC is a grouping of official environmental advisory bodies across the EU, and includes the UK Climate Change Committee.

    Although the Paris agreement has been characterized as a commitment of effort by parties rather than  Kyoto style legally binding emission reductions , Professor Macrory’s analysis  demonstrated there were many legal obligations encased in the agreement. He went on to argue that the ambitious overall goals of the agreement were likely to influence the development of climate change law and litigation at national level.

    Professor Macrory’s power point :  Macrory Paris agreement