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    Get your career going: a conference for early career researchers

    By Guest Blogger, on 22 February 2015

    pencil-iconWritten by Dr Sonali Wayal, Research Associate, UCL Centre for Sexual Health and HIV Research

    The Early Career Forum's Conference Organising Committee

    The Early Career Forum’s Conference organising committee

    UCL Institute of Epidemiology and Health Care’s Early Career Forum held its ‘Get your career going’ one-day conference on 19 February 2015. It was attended by PhD students and early career researchers from UCL Population Health Sciences.

    The morning kicked off with coffee, pastries, and networking. “I wish I was advised about the importance of acquiring skills beyond just the PhD” was the inaugural sentiment of Professor Robert Miller, who chaired the conference. The conference was tailored to provide insights into how to advance your career both inside and outside of academia.

    The first presenter, Dr Fiona Stevenson, gave a talk on ‘Teaching in Higher Education’. Her top tips for becoming a lecturer were to acquire a breadth of teaching experience which could involve giving lectures, developing course materials or doing small group teaching or tutoring. Proactively seeking teaching opportunities by contacting course administrators about your specialist skills or setting up new courses can be one way of getting such experience.

    Following this, Professor Robert Miller, in his talk ‘Getting Your Paper Published’, emphasised the significance of choosing an appropriate journal to publish your study results by understanding the target audience, the content/focus of your research, the journal’s impact factor and the rejection rates of journals. Making pragmatic decisions based on the best audience for your work and the likelihood of your paper being accepted is important.

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    Queen Square Symposium

    By news editor, on 27 March 2012

    Ana Carolina Saraiva (ACS), a first year PhD student at the Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders, and Xun Yu Choong (XYC), a first year student on the four-year PhD programme in Clinical Neuroscience, report on the 13th Queen Square Symposium, held on 16 March.

    What began as a small event over a decade ago has developed to become the primary student-led conference in Queen Square (QS).

    The QS Symposium is organised by students for students, bringing them together across departments, and aims to provide a platform to showcase the diversity of scientific research carried out in the UCL Institute of Neurology. The format for this was presenting posters about research projects.

    This year showcased a variety of high-quality research, ranging from cognitive to clinical studies of neuroscience and neurology. How does the menstrual cycle affect perception of emotional faces? Are enlarged perivascular spaces on MRI a new imaging window for cerebral small vessel diseases?

    This was an opportunity for the bright minds of the future to show us what they’ve got!

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    Film Screening and Q&A: Piled Higher & Deeper

    By Ruth Howells, on 16 November 2011

    If you know anyone currently studying towards a PhD, chances are they’ll know and probably be a fan of the cult PhD (“Piled Higher & Deeper”) comics, which chronicle the life (or lack thereof) of the graduate student.

    The comics, created by Stanford PhD student Jorge Cham, have a significant following – so much so that a film of the comic strip has now been made and is being screened at universities across the globe.

    UCLU Postgraduate Association hosted the first UK screening of the film, sponsored by Times Higher Education, on Monday 14 November in a packed Logan Hall at the Institute of Education. The film showing was followed by a Q&A with Jorge and one of the film’s stars, Alexandra Lockwood.

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