Events
  • Follow UCL on social media

    UCL Twitter feed YouTube channel UCL Facebook page UCL SoundCloud UCL SoundCloud
  • A A A

    Lunch Hour Lecture: Ovarian cancer screening — the long journey

    By Ella Richards, on 15 March 2016

    Will effective screening for ovarian cancer, one of the most common cancers affecting women, ever become a reality?

    A group of researchers started to reach for this goal more than 30 years ago. As Professor Usha Menon (UCL Institute for Women’s Health) explained in her Lunch Hour Lecture, determining a method of diagnosing early stage ovarian cancer is almost in touching distance.

    What is ovarian cancer?

    Ovarian cancer is cancer of the ovaries and fallopian tubes, and it is the fifth most common cause of cancer-related deaths in women in Europe.

    Unfortunately most ovarian cancer patients do not have clear symptoms in the early stages of the disease, meaning that 55% of women with ovarian cancer are diagnosed in stage III or IV, when the cancer is harder to treat.

    Moreover, there is a 90% survival rate when ovarian cancer is diagnosed at stage I, however only a 5% to 20% survival rate for five years when diagnosed at stage III or IV. (more…)

    A grey area: do the elderly hold the key to tackling non-communicable disease?

    By news editor, on 6 December 2012

    The Houses of Parliament, Westminster, London.

    Written by Amelia Tait of the UCL Institute for Global Health.

    On Tuesday 4 December, the Attlee Suite in the Houses of Parliament was filled to the brim with more than 140 audience members, policy makers, and global health experts from around the world meeting to discuss the growing global burden of non-communicable diseases.

    Professor Anthony Costello, Director of UCL’s Institute for Global health, chaired the debate and opened by remarking that the “wicked problem” of NCDs accounts for 63% of deaths worldwide.

    Non-communicable or lifestyle diseases, such as heart disease, stroke, cancer and diabetes are medical conditions of a non-infectious nature, and – in Costello’s words – are “the biggest killer of people in the world”.

    Learning from HIV?

    The panel’s experts led a debate on the ways in which the NCD movement can learn from the precedents set by the HIV/AIDS movement in the 1980s.

    (more…)

    Finding out more about breast cancer treatment

    By news editor, on 30 October 2012

    By guest blogger Danielle Vincent, Communications Officer at the Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust

    Las tnight members of the public were given the opportunity to learn more about the latest breast cancer research and treatments being pioneered by UCL and the Royal Free Hospital.

    About 120 people attended a breast cancer public engagement event at the Royal Free to mark breast cancer awareness month.

    (more…)

    Transgenic animals help us ‘understand disease’

    By Frances-Catherine Quevenco, on 10 June 2011

    Fluorescent fish, goats’ milk producing silk and mice with bat-like limbs are just some of the peculiar outcomes of genetically engineered animals. “Who in the audience finds tinkering with the animal genome a little disconcerting?” asked Mark Lythgoe. A few hands shot up…and why shouldn’t they? What do transgenic animals offer apart from quirky phenotypes?

    (more…)