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    Archive for the 'General Learning Technology' Category

    Lecturecast archive 8th – 12th August 2016

    By Domi C Sinclair, on 22 July 2016

    We are yet approaching the annual Lecturecast archive, during which, all Lecturecast recordings located under available/unavailable tabs will be moved into the ‘archive’ category within the Lecturecast system – at this point they will become unavailable for viewing. Unless you have specifically requested otherwise your content will be included in this process.
    It is the responsibility of content owners who want recordings available from one academic year to the next to move their content back from ‘archive’ to ‘available’ once the archiving process has been completed.


    This year, archiving will take place take place between 8th and 12th August 2016. During this time the Lecturecast service should be considered unavailable. Please do not log into the admin interface during this period.
    Once the service is restored you will receive an email informing you that archiving is complete, content can then be un-archived – this is straightforward and details are given in the Lecturecast Guide here http://bit.ly/17m3JOX
    It is also important to note that, next academic year the usual monthly content deletion cycle will commence in October, according to the Lecturecast Archive Policy: https://wiki.ucl.ac.uk/display/LecturecastResourceCentre/Retention%3A+Archiving+and+deletion+Policy
    PLEASE NOTE: Archived material will only be deleted two years after the date of its capture/recording. Thus it is critical to move old material out of the archive if you want it retained for viewing
    If you have any questions or concerns surrounding this procedure please contact digi-ed@ucl.ac.uk

    ELESIG London 3rd Meeting – Evaluation By Numbers

    By Mira Vogel, on 13 July 2016

    The third ELESIG London event, ‘Evaluation By Numbers‘, was a two-hour event on July 7th. Building on the successful format of our last meeting, we invited two presenters on the theme of ‘proto-analytics’ – an important aspect of institutional readiness for learning analytics which empowers individuals to work with their own log data to come up with theories about what to do next. There were 15 participants with a range of experiences and interests, including artificial intelligence, ethics, stats and data visualisation, and a range of priorities including academic research, academic development, and data security, and real-time data analysis.
    After a convivial round of introductions there was a talk from Michele Milner, Head of Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning at the University of East London, titled Empowering Staff And Students. Determined to avoid data-driven decision making, UEL’s investigations had confirmed a lack of enthusiasm and wariness on the part of most staff to work with log data. This is normal in the sector and probably attributable to a combination of inexperience and overwork. The UEL project had different strands. One was attendance monitoring  feeding into a student engagement metric with more predictive power including correlation between engagement (operationalised as e.g. library and VLE access, data from the tablets students are issued) and achievement. This feeds a student retention app, along with demographic weightings. Turnitin and Panopto (lecture capture) data have so far been elusive, but UEL is persisting on the basis these gross measures do correlate.
    The project gave academic departments a way to visualise retention as an overall red-amber-green rating, and simulate the expected effects of different interventions. The feedback they received from academics was broadly positive but short of enthused, and with good questions about cut-off dates, workload allocation, and nature and timing of interventions. Focus group with students revealed that there was low awareness of data collection, that students weren’t particularly keen to see the data, and that if presented with it they would prefer barcharts by date rather than comparators with other students. We discussed ethics of data collection, including the possibility of student opt-in or opt-out of opening their anonymised data set.
    Our next speaker was Andreas Konstantinidis from Kings College London, on Utilising Moodle Logs (slides).  He attributes the low numbers of educators are currently working with VLE data to limitations of logs. In Moodle’s case this is particularly to do with limited filtering, and the exclusion of some potentially important data including Book pages and links within Labels. To address this, he and his colleague Cat Grafton worked on some macros to allow individual academics to import and visualise logs downloaded from their VLE (KEATS) in a MS Excel spreadsheet.
    To dodge death by data avarice they first had to consider which data to include, deciding on the following. Mean session length does not firmly correspond to anything but the fluctuations are interesting. Bounce rate indicates students are having difficulty finding what they need. Time of use, combining two or more filters, can inform plans about when to schedule events or release materials. You can also see the top and bottom 10 students engaging with Moodle, and the top and bottom resources used – this data can be an ice breaker to be able to discuss reasons and support. IP addresses, may reveal where students are gathering e.g. a certain IT room, which in turn may inform decisions about where to reach students.
    Kings have made KEATS Analytics available to all (includes workbook), and you can download it from http://tinyurl.com/ELESIG-LA. It currently supports Moodle 2.6 and 2.8, with 3.X coming soon. At UCL we’re on 2.8 only for the next few weeks, so if you want to work with KEATS analytics here’s some guidance for downloading your logs now.
    As Michele (quoting Eliot) said, “Hell is a place where nothing connects with nothing”. Although it is not always fit to use immediately, data abounds – so what we’re looking for now are good pedagogical questions which data can help to answer. I’ve found Anna Lea Dyckhoff’s meta-analysis of tutors’ action research questions helpful. To empower individuals and build data capabilities in an era of potentially data-driven decision-making, a good start might be to address these questions in short worksheets which take colleagues who aren’t statisticians through statistical analysis of their data. If you are good with data and its role in educational decision-making, please get in touch.
    A participant pointed us to a series of podcasts from Jisc around the ethical and legal issues of learning analytics. Richard Treves has as write-up of the event and my co-organiser Leo Havemann has collected the tweets. For a report on the current state of play with learning analytics, see Sclater and colleagues’ April 2016 review of UK and International Practice. Sam Ahern mentioned there are still places on a 28th July data visualization workshop being run by the Software Sustainability Institute.
    To receive communications from us, including details of our next ELESIG London meeting, please sign up to the ELESIG London group on Ning. It’s free and open to all with an interest in educational evaluation.

    KEATS Analytics screenshot

     

    Communicating and collaborating

    By Domi C Sinclair, on 11 July 2016

    Whether it is a tutor wanting to communicate with their students, or students wanting to connect with one another for support or group work, the ability to communicate and collaborate with others effectively is critical to university life. Thankfully there is a plethora of ways this can be done, using both external tools or those hosted by UCL.

    One such internal tools is called MyPortfolio. It is an online portfolio tool, that also facilitates connections and collaboration via profile pages and group spaces. One of the really great things about MyPortfolio is that it also allows you to easily embed a wide range of external content, so the limits of what you can do with it are your imagination.

    Why not check out our MyPortfolio YouTube playlist to find out more.

    Understanding the essence(s) of portfolio-based learning

    By Domi C Sinclair, on 15 June 2016

    Last week saw the first ever joint AAEEBL and CRA conference, hosted in Edinburgh between 6th – 8th June 2016 whioch was titled, ‘Understanding the essence(s) of portfolio-based learning’. For those who don’t  know AAEEBL is a US based global portfolio organisation, it stands for the Association for Authentic, Experiential and Evidence Based Learning. CRA is a very similar UK based organisation, with it’s name standing for the Centre for Recording Achievement. So, as you can imagine this was a portfolio conference.

    There were 3 key themes that emerged from the conference. These themes kept popping up in presentations and discussion :

    Scaffolding
    Process not product
    Cultural shift/ change

    Let’s look briefly at these themes below, but if you would like a more detailed look them please see the AAEEBL/ CRA Conference 2016 on my personal blog.

    The first theme,  scaffolding, refers to the importance of having structure around portfolio activities. This predominately broke down into conversations about templates and frameworks for guiding staff and students without restricting them. Templates can be useful for giving students a little bit of direction without restricting their creative freedom (depending on the content and detail of the template). They are also useful because, anecdotally, students can find it overwhelming to simply be given a blank space to do with as they please. A template gives students a starting place. In relation to frameworks this was mostly a discussion about their usefulness for staff, to help give them some scaffolding from which to build a portfolio activity into their module or course, either as a single assessment or as an on-going activity to support learning via reflective practice. It was thought that this framework should be fairly high level, meaning it was not too prescriptive and not software dependant.

    This actually leads quite nicely into the next theme, process not product. There was a strong emphasis on focusing on the process and pedagogy of portfolios and not the product (either meaning the final output or the technological product used to facilitate them). It is easy to become distracted by debating whether you are using the best online portfolio system. At the moment UCL use MyPortfolio, which is based on the Mahara platform. As good practice we will be reviewing the use of this platform in the near future, however whether we use Mahara, WordPress or Office 365 the process of running a successful portfolio is the same and the buttons are not as important as strong pedagogy.

    The final theme is perhaps the one that has the biggest impact for portfolio, especially online portfolio adoption at institutions, and that is the need for a cultural shift/ change. This is perhaps best summarised by an analogy that was used by Trent Batson (President/CEO of AAEEBL) at the conference. He was talking about the American automobile and how it took 35 years to become fully part of US culture. First they invented the automobile and it opened up a lot of possibilities, such as people being able to commute more easily for work. But even after this it still took time to build all the roads, parking spaces and petrol stations needed. The idea was proven but it took a lot longer for the infrastructure to become part of daily culture. It is fairly easy to see how this relates to portfolios. There are a number of case studies out there to prove their potential, however the infrastructure to support them is not fully part of the culture of universities. Portfolios tend to expose the learning process which can be an intimidating prospect for both students and staff a like. However, portfolios can offer a very useful reflective space where you can use journals to do written reflections, and also reflect whilst curating examples of work you have produced that you are going to include in your portfolio. Reflection gives us the ability to stop and think about our thinking, and to understand how we can do better moving forward.

    Introducing the new E-Learning Baseline

    By Jessica Gramp, on 7 June 2016

    UCL E-Learning Baseline 2016The UCL E-Learning Baseline is now available as a printable colour booklet. This can be downloaded from the UCL E-Learning Baseline wiki page: http://bit.ly/UCLELearningBaseline

    The 2016 version is a product of merging the UCL Moodle Baseline with the Student Minimum Entitlement to On-Line Support from the Institute of Education.

    The Digital Education Advisory team will be distributing printed copies to E-Learning Champions and Teaching Administrators for use in departments.

    Please could you also distribute this to your own networks to help us communicate the new guidelines to all staff.

    Support is available to help staff apply this to their Moodle course templates via digi-ed@ucl.ac.uk.

    We are also working on a number of ideas to help people understand the baseline (via a myth busting quiz) and a way for people to show their courses are Baseline (or Baseline+) compliant by way with a colleague endorsed badge.

    See ‘What’s new?’, to quickly see what has changed since the last 2013 Baseline.

     

    ISD Digital Roadshow@IOE

    By Clive Young, on 24 May 2016

    draioe

    Join us for a digital roadshow on June 29th 10.30-3.30pm, Nunn Hall, Level 4, UCL Institute of Education. All staff and students are welcome.

    Listen to key ideas about digital capabilities in relation to educational practice from Diana Laurillard and Nazlin Bhimani. Find out about the range of digital services available from UCL ISD and IT for IOE in short talks and PechaKucha presentations.

    Get practical support and share ideas and issues on stalls including; ‘There’s an app for that’, a ‘Mac Brilliance bar’, ‘The digital library‘, Digital Media Services and much more.

    Network with colleagues over a brown bag lunch, share ideas and concerns and find out how ISD and  IT for IOE and the UCL IOE Library can help staff and students.

    http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/isd-digital-roadshow-ioe-tickets-24865392057