Affect, Audience Experience and the Digital Humanities

By Vasileios Routsis, on 12 December 2013

Affective Experiences

Authors: Christina Kamposiori & Vasileios Routsis

Monday 9th December 2013 saw our conference ‘Affective Experiences: media art, design & research’ which took place at the Parasol Unit: foundation for contemporary art. This conference was a great opportunity to close the conversations we started on February on the context of the AHRC funded project ‘New Media, Audiences and Affective Experiences’.

Professor Ernest Edmonds

The project aimed to establish a platform for creative dialogue and collaboration for doctoral students from City University London, Kings College London, Middlesex University, New London Graduate School (NLGS) and University College London in the academic fields of Creative Industries and Practice, Art and Design and Digital Humanities. In this context, we were honoured to represent UCLDH as a distinguished partner of this collaborative effort. During the lifetime of the project, we organised three seminars that took place at the City University London, discussing research methods in the direction of understanding audience engagement and cultural experience through digital technologies.

Lars HoeghThrough our one day conference we aimed to bring together artists, PhD students and established academics and researchers from a variety of disciplines, including art and design, cultural and creative industries, media studies, museum studies and the digital humanities. Participants presented their research and discussed new developments on understanding and measuring affect and audience experience in the digital age.

Professor Melissa Terras presenting Textal

In particular, our keynote and panel speakers addressed issues from a wide and diverse spectrum of perspectives, ranging from the theoretical aspects of affect and perception in relation to audience experience to the more practice-based ones. For example, we had the opportunity to hear from artists and museum professionals on the innovative ways they used to engage with audiences, such as interactive installations, experiments and digital applications. In addition, we looked on methodologies and applications for furthering audience/user related-research; that is also when Professor Melissa Terras presented Textal.

Professor Lisa Blackman

Concluding, this conference was a stimulating experience and we hope that the end of this project will be a start for new collaborations and discussions on the issues of affect, audience/user experience and digital technologies in the Arts & Humanities and Culture.

Acknowledgements

Special thanks to Irida Ntalla, PhD Candidate at City University London (project’s principal co-ordinator), Marianne Markowski, PhD Candidate at Middlesex University (programme committee member), Anastasia-Yvoni Spiliopoulou, UCL Digital Humanities MA Graduate (conference volunteer) and Kathianne Hingwan (conference volunteer) for the great collaboration!

CFP: 2014 OCWC Global Conference

By Simon Mahony, on 26 October 2013

The 2014 OCWC Global Conference is being held in Ljubljana, Slovenia. One of the local organisers is a completing MA/MSc DH student, Davor Orlic.

The 10th annual OpenCourseWare Consortium Global Conference will be held in Ljubljana, Slovenia, on April 23-25, 2014. The OpenCourseWare Consortium and the Knowledge for All Foundation are jointly organizing the event whose special theme is Open Education for a Multicultural World.

Submissions of papers are invited on all topics related to open education for the conference proceedings, and proposals for workshops.

The conference will be organised around four tracks:

  • Research and Technology
  • Open Educational Policies
  • Pedagogical Impact
  • Project Dissemination

Submission deadline: December 1st 2013.

Full details are on the conference website and downloadable as a PDF.

 

The Humanities Matter!

By Sarah Davenport, on 19 July 2013

UCLDH and 4Hum have been very busy producing a new infographic, The Humanities Matter, using statistics and visualisations to show just how important the Humanities are. Please feel free to share!

Textal text analysis app now available!

By Sarah Davenport, on 19 July 2013

textal-outnow04-poster copy

We are really pleased to announce that Textal, our text analysis app created in collaboration with the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis, is now available for download!

Textal is a free smartphone app for iOS that allows users to analyze documents, web pages and tweet streams, exploring the relationships between words in the text via an intuitive word cloud interface. The app generates visualizations and statics that can be shared without effort, which makes it a fun and useful tool for both research and play, bridging the gap between text analysis and mobile computing. We also see it as a public engagement activity for Digital Humanities.

You can read more at www.textal.org, and download Textal for free in the iTunes app store and we’re also on twitter, at @textal.

If you have an iPhone or and iPad, please try it out and send us your feedback.

Seminars: Digital Epigraphy and Archaeology; A Catalogue of Digital Editions

By Simon Mahony, on 10 July 2013

digiclas

This week’s Digital Classicist seminar has a double bill with one of the speakers being a UCLDH PhD student at DIS.

Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2013
16:30 Friday July 12 in room STB2, Stewart House (the far side of the courtyard towards Russell Square), Senate House.

—————————————————————————

16:30
Eleni Bozia (University of Florida)
The Digital Epigraphy and Archaeology Project

This presentation will introduce the Digital Epigraphy and Archaeology Project, a digital toolbox meant to assist individual epigraphists, archaeologists, institutions, and museums. Our project is an open-source, cross-platform web-application designed to facilitate the digital preservation, study, and electronic dissemination of ancient inscriptions and other archaeological artifacts. It allows epigraphists to digitize in 3D their squeezes using our novel cost-effective technique, which overcomes the limitations of the current methods. Also, it gives users the option to perform automatic morphological analysis and comparison between archaeological artifacts digitized in 3D, such as statues, coins, lamps, and vases.
——————————————————————-
17:30
Greta Franzini (University College London)
A Catalogue of Digital Editions:
Towards a digital edition of Augustine’s De Civitate Dei

The oldest surviving manuscript of St Augustine’s De Civitate Dei dates back to the early fifth century, and most research on it predates the 1950s. Its much debated provenance and authorship, due to being contemporary with Augustine himself, are as intriguing as its rare palaeographical features and marginalia. I am creating a detailed catalogue of extant digital editions to examine best practice in the field of digital editions. Lessons from this catalogue will be presented to help scholars better understand the field of electronic editing, and further to inform the production of my electronic edition of De Civitate Dei.

—————————————————————-

All are welcome

The seminars will be followed by wine and refreshments.

For more information, see the seminar website.

 

SMKE workshop: Social Media and the Museum

By Sarah Davenport, on 16 May 2013

2SMKE

 

 

 

 

Thursday 6th June, 9:30am-5:00pm

Room G31, Foster Court

As part of the Social Media Knowledge Exchange (SMKE), UCL, together with its project partners, is hosting a one day workshop on 6th June on the theme: Social Media and the Museum.

General workshop theme: how social media is changing museum practice and visitor experience; how social media can be integrated into museums and collections.

This is a one day workshop with talks from a range of academic and non-academic social media experts, targeted at doctoral students and early career researchers. There will be plenty of opportunity for discussion as well as hands on practical experience. Workshop places are strictly limited and so early registration is necessary. Please register via Eventbrite.

Please see the SMKE website for full programme information.

Registration is also now open for the SMKE conference on 2 & 3 July.

Reference cultures in Europe – Major European research grant awarded

By Sarah Davenport, on 7 May 2013

How did the large and cultural powerful countries Britain, France, and Germany influence public debates in smaller countries like the Netherlands, Belgium and Luxembourg?

Cultural historians and digital humanists at UCL and the universities of Utrecht and Trier will address this question in the new research project Asymmetrical Encounters: E-Humanity Approaches to Reference Cultures in Europe, 1815–1992‘ for which they have been awarded a grant of €1 million by HERA (Humanities in the European Research Area). In the UK, Ulrich Tiedau (UCL Dutch/Digital Humanities) will be the Principal Investigator.

The project will explore cultural aspects of European identity and how reference cultures have changed over the course of the past two centuries. Using innovative digital techniques the project team will mine and analyse digital collections of the National Library of the Netherlands, the British Library, the Bibliothèque Nationale de Luxembourg and other European libraries with large repositories of digitised newspapers and periodicals. Text mining and sentiment mining open up the perspective of a quantitative approach to the history of mentalities, allowing researchers to discover long-term developments and turning points in public debates, as well as to map vectors of cross-cultural influences.

HERA is a collaboration between the AHRC and twenty other European research funding organizations, with the aim to stimulate the collaboration between leading research institutions in Europe. This year funding was made available for new and exciting humanities-centred projects on the theme “Cultural Encounters”.

Digging Digital Humanities – blog post about recent visit to UCLDH

By Sarah Davenport, on 26 March 2013

Kim Martin from Digging Digital Humanities has written a blog post about her recent research visit to UCLDH. We’re glad to see our various mugs make such a prominent appearance!

Social Interpretation – applying the principles of social media to relationships with cultural objects

By Sarah Davenport, on 8 February 2013

Claire Ross writes about the Social Interpretation project:

The Social Interpretation project was a one year Research and Development exercise joint funded by the NESTA / Arts Council / AHRC digital R&D Fund, and Imperial War Museums (IWM).  At its heart, it aimed to bring successful social interactions already found online and apply them across IWM’s collections – making social objects out of museums objects.  The aim being to increase spread and engagement of  IWM collections.

Museums’ objects have too often been seen as purely historical objects. They aren’t. Rather, they are social objects, inspiring emotional attachment, discussion, debate and action. This project is at the forefront of capturing and representing what audiences feel and say in response to our collections and subjects.

Social Interpretation aimed to holistically represent the discussions about, and sharing of, our objects by audiences. The intention was to do this seamlessly across all of the museums digital outputs (in-gallery, on-mobile and on-line). Making museums objects truly social.

The project essentially applied the models and insight found in social networks, and successful interactions online generally, and applying them wholesale to museum collections.

You can find out more about the project process at http://blogs.iwm.org.uk/social-interpretation/.

Or Read the final report from NESTA: http://www.artsdigitalrnd.org.uk/sites/default/files/case-study-documents/Digital_RandD_CaseStdy_SocialInterpretation.pdf

Or Watch a snazzy video.

UCLDH nominated in Digital Humanities Awards 2012

By Sarah Davenport, on 5 February 2013

We at UCLDH are very proud to announce that three of our projects have been nominated in the Digital Humanities Awards 2012!

Best Digital Humanities Project for public audiences category: Transcribe Bentham

Best DH visualization or infographic category: Quantifying Digital Humanities, an infographic

Best Use of DH for Fun category: Textal

Voting in the DH Awards is open to all, you can see all the nominees and vote here: http://dhawards.org/dhawards2012/voting/