Seminar: A Collection of Greek Ritual Norms (CGRN)

By Simon Mahony, on 21 July 2015

Digital Classicist seminar logo

Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2015

Friday July 24 at 16:30 in room G21A, Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU

Saskia Peels (Liège): ‘A Collection of Greek Ritual Norms Project (CGRN)’

This talk presents the project A Collection of Greek Ritual Norms, abbreviated CGRN (University of Liège). The CGRN is an online collection and database of over 200 Greek inscriptions with a religious subject matter, notably normative texts concerning sacrifice and purification. Using the EpiDoc XML standard, we have lemmatized the inscriptions and encoded geographic, chronological and thematic information, so that this corpus will be searchable in many different ways. Thus, our website serves not only scholars wanting to study individual inscriptions, but we hope that our tool may further our understanding of what are usually called ‘sacred laws’ more generally.

CGRN-project

As always the seminar will be followed by discussion over wine and refrshments.

ALL WELCOME

The full abstract is available on the seminar programme page.

The full 2015 programme is available on the Digital Classicist London seminar page.

 

Digital Classicist seminar: dissertation special

By Simon Mahony, on 23 June 2015

Digital Classicist seminar logoDigital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2015

Friday June 26th at 16:30, in Room G31, Foster Court, Malet Place, WC1E 6BT

The seminar this week features Digital Humanities / Digital Classics MA and MSc students from both UCL and KCL giving short presentations on their dissertation research. Two are on the MA/MSc DH programme and one on MSc IS.

Note the different location as this week’s seminar is in room G31 at Foster Court.

As always this will be followed by wine and refreshments and all are welcome.

Emma King (KCL): ‘Strand Lane Baths 1776-1778: 3D modelling historic spaces’

Lauren Knight (KCL): ‘The City of London as a Museum’

Ioanna Kyvernitou (UCL): ‘Reconstructing a historical knowledge representation of “Women” on the Semantic Web’

Argula Rublack (KCL): ‘Digitally interlinking manuscripts of the twelfth-century Arabic-Latin translation movement’

Katherine Steiner (UCL): ‘Digital methods in classical research: an EpiDoc case study’

Lucia Vannini (UCL): ‘Virtual reunification of papyrus fragments’

Abstracts are available on the programme page.

The full 2015 programme is available on the Digital Classicist London seminar page.

Seminar: The Europeana network of Ancient Greek and Latin Epigraphy (EAGLE) and Linked Open Data

By Simon Mahony, on 30 June 2014

digiclas

This week’s Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar:Pietro Liuzzo (Heidelberg)

‘The Europeana network of Ancient Greek and Latin Epigraphy (EAGLE) and Linked Open Data’.

Friday July 4th at 16:30 in room 102 (Athlone), Senate House, Malet Street, WC1E 7HU

The Europeana network of Ancient Greek and Latin Epigraphy aims to provide historians and the general public with a curated online multi-text edition which has high quality contents and related contents as well as high quality data in multiple interoperable formats. Linked Open Data principles aim at bringing things together so we have tried to follow those guidelines. EAGLE considered two standards: TEI – EpiDoc and CIDOC CRM and we work towards tools to facilitate wilful alignment as well as coordinated linking via third parties annotations or through the alignment to common vocabularies (of contents), gazetteers and bibliographies.

Full abstract is available.

The seminar will be followed by wine and refreshments.

ALL WELCOME

The full 2014 programme is at the Digital Classicist.

Seminar: The Leipzig Open Fragmentary Texts Series and Digital Fragmenta Historicorum Graecorum Projects

By Simon Mahony, on 23 June 2014

digiclas

Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2014

Monica Berti, Greta Franzini & Simona Stoyanova (Leipzig)
‘The Leipzig Open Fragmentary Texts Series and Digital Fragmenta Historicorum Graecorum Projects’

Friday June 27 at 16:30 in room G37, Senate House, Malet Street, WC1E 7HU

The Leipzig Open Fragmentary Texts Series (LOFTS) is a new collaborative project that seeks to create open electronic editions of ancient works that survive only through quotations and text re-uses in later texts. The large diversity and dispersion of these materials entreats a dynamic infrastructure which fully supports and represents the relationships between sources, citations and annotations. LOFTS links fragments to the source text from which they are drawn, and aligns them to multiple editions and translations, thus providing an enhanced understanding of the fragmentary textual heritage it showcases.

Full abstract

The seminar will be followed by wine and refreshments.

ALL WELCOME

The full 2014 programme is available on the Digital Classicist website.

Seminars: Digital Epigraphy and Archaeology; A Catalogue of Digital Editions

By Simon Mahony, on 10 July 2013

digiclas

This week’s Digital Classicist seminar has a double bill with one of the speakers being a UCLDH PhD student at DIS.

Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2013
16:30 Friday July 12 in room STB2, Stewart House (the far side of the courtyard towards Russell Square), Senate House.

—————————————————————————

16:30
Eleni Bozia (University of Florida)
The Digital Epigraphy and Archaeology Project

This presentation will introduce the Digital Epigraphy and Archaeology Project, a digital toolbox meant to assist individual epigraphists, archaeologists, institutions, and museums. Our project is an open-source, cross-platform web-application designed to facilitate the digital preservation, study, and electronic dissemination of ancient inscriptions and other archaeological artifacts. It allows epigraphists to digitize in 3D their squeezes using our novel cost-effective technique, which overcomes the limitations of the current methods. Also, it gives users the option to perform automatic morphological analysis and comparison between archaeological artifacts digitized in 3D, such as statues, coins, lamps, and vases.
——————————————————————-
17:30
Greta Franzini (University College London)
A Catalogue of Digital Editions:
Towards a digital edition of Augustine’s De Civitate Dei

The oldest surviving manuscript of St Augustine’s De Civitate Dei dates back to the early fifth century, and most research on it predates the 1950s. Its much debated provenance and authorship, due to being contemporary with Augustine himself, are as intriguing as its rare palaeographical features and marginalia. I am creating a detailed catalogue of extant digital editions to examine best practice in the field of digital editions. Lessons from this catalogue will be presented to help scholars better understand the field of electronic editing, and further to inform the production of my electronic edition of De Civitate Dei.

—————————————————————-

All are welcome

The seminars will be followed by wine and refreshments.

For more information, see the seminar website.

 

Seminar: An Ontology for 3D Visualisation in Cultural Heritage

By Simon Mahony, on 11 June 2013

digiclas

This week’s seminar in the Digital Classicist & Institute of Classical Studies Summer seminars for 2013:

Valeria Vitale (King’s College London)
‘An Ontology for 3D Visualisation in Cultural Heritage’

Time: Friday June 14th at 16:30
Place: Room G37, Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU

Behind each scholarly 3D visualisation is a thorough study of records, iconography, literary sources, artistic canons and precedents. However, this research process is seldom visible in the final outcome to either the general public or the academy. This paper suggests the use of an RDF ontology to describe 3D models, identify relationships, and connect them to their diverse related sources (photographs, GIS coordinates, academic literature, etc.). If such an ontology can be derived and applied it will optimise the documentation process, and further, allow 3D visualisations to join and enrich the growing network of linked digital resources to study the past.

The seminar will be followed by wine and refreshments.

All are welcome

The series is being recorder for audio and video which will be made available on the seminar webpage along with presentation slides.

The full 2013 programme is now online.

Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2013

By Simon Mahony, on 2 May 2013

Digital ClassicistThe programme for the Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2013 is now published (the abstracts will be added very soon). This year we will be recording video and so presentation slides, audio and video files will be available.

These seminars range far beyond an interest in the ancient world. Each paper must have an innovative digital component and incorporate Digital Humanities techniques and methodologies. The series seeks to accommodate broader theoretical considerations of the use of digital technology in Classical Studies. The content needs to be of interest both to classicists, ancient historians or archaeologists, and to information specialists or digital humanists, and have an academic research agenda relevant to at least one of those fields.

All seminars are on Fridays at 16:30 at Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU and the programme flyer can be downloaded as a PDF.

All are welcome; these are public events with no need to book.

eHumanities Seminar in Leipzig

By Simon Mahony, on 9 October 2012

I’m very pleased to have been invited to open the 2012 Leipzig e-Humanities Seminar series. Their new e-Humanities Centre is a collaborative venture between the computer scientists and humanities scholars there. My title for the talk is The Digital Classicist: building a Digital Humanities Community. I’ve been asked to analyze and present my experiences with helping to build this cross-disciplinary community and particularly as the organizers tell me that they have modeled their series on the long-running and successful Digital Classicist one. I’m very much looking forward to visiting Leipzig and regret that I will not be able to stay for longer.

Digital Classicist & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar, Summer 2012

By Simon Mahony, on 25 May 2012

Digital ClassicistThe full programme for the annual Digital Classicist & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar series is available on our 2012 seminar page. As always, abstracts are there in advance and the slides and audiocast will appear soon after each seminar. Previous seminars and other Digital Classicist events (conference panels etc) are on the main seminar page.

Looking through, you will see that most, if not all, range far beyond an interest in the ancient world. Each paper must have an innovative digital component and many incorporate Digital Humanities techniques and methodologies. The series seeks to accommodate broader theoretical consideration of the use of digital technology in Classical Studies. The content should be of interest both to classicists, ancient historians, or archaeologists, and to information scientists or digital humanists, as well as having an academic research agenda relevant to at least one of those fields.

All are welcome; these are public events with no need to book.

A trip to Durham for the Classical Association Conference

By Simon Mahony, on 7 April 2011

Durham is a great University town and I’m looking forward to a trip up there for the 2011 Classical Association Conference. The Digital Classicist community are presenting two panels there this year, one chaired by myself, Teaching and Publication of Classics in the Internet Age, and another, Ancient Space, Linked Data and Digital Research, by a friend and colleague Gabriel Bodard. In addition to the conference itself, Durham Classics and Ancient History are hosting a Digital Classicist Training Day where we will have a morning session looking at and playing with Generic Web Tools and an afternoon one introducing participants to the Papyrological Editor.

It’ll be good to visit the Venerable Bede, Binchester Roman Fort and of course to catch up with the friends and colleagues we only see at conferences.

I hope the weather holds!