Archive for the 'Digital Humanities' Category

Digital Classicist seminar: dissertation special

By Simon Mahony, on 23 June 2015

Digital Classicist seminar logoDigital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2015

Friday June 26th at 16:30, in Room G31, Foster Court, Malet Place, WC1E 6BT

The seminar this week features Digital Humanities / Digital Classics MA and MSc students from both UCL and KCL giving short presentations on their dissertation research. Two are on the MA/MSc DH programme and one on MSc IS.

Note the different location as this week’s seminar is in room G31 at Foster Court.

As always this will be followed by wine and refreshments and all are welcome.

Emma King (KCL): ‘Strand Lane Baths 1776-1778: 3D modelling historic spaces’

Lauren Knight (KCL): ‘The City of London as a Museum’

Ioanna Kyvernitou (UCL): ‘Reconstructing a historical knowledge representation of “Women” on the Semantic Web’

Argula Rublack (KCL): ‘Digitally interlinking manuscripts of the twelfth-century Arabic-Latin translation movement’

Katherine Steiner (UCL): ‘Digital methods in classical research: an EpiDoc case study’

Lucia Vannini (UCL): ‘Virtual reunification of papyrus fragments’

Abstracts are available on the programme page.

The full 2015 programme is available on the Digital Classicist London seminar page.

Hangeul and hanja in domain names

By Chris J Dillon, on 17 June 2015

King Sejong

King Sejong stands in the middle of Sejong St in front of the Sejong Cultural Center in Seoul. Obviously a key historical figure, then. He was behind the creation of the Korean “hangeul” script in the mid-15th Century. It was done scientifically, so that many consonants were pictures of where they are articulated and are systematically related to similar consonants. So ㄱ, g is related to ㅋ, k with the additional dash and to ㄲ, kk by duplication. ㄲ, incidentally, represents a tense k sound which may be unique to the Korean language. The vowels are a system of dots and dashes, and so ㅣ is i and ㅏ is a.

I was in Seoul for the ICANN Variant Issues Project meeting on the Chinese, Japanese and Korean Label Generation Rules (i.e. which characters should be allowed in Top Level labels). China made huge progress early on and Japan has caught up. Korea has not used Chinese characters, “hanja”, much for several decades but is keen to be able to use them for business reasons – .現代 “Hyundai” would be a lot more widely understood in East Asia than the hangeul way of writing it: .현대.

Just before the meeting I had decided to read through the proposed Japanese table and found various things I shan’t trouble you with – I learnt at an early age that linguists’ ideas of “interesting” don’t necessarily correspond with those of non-linguists’. Then I found something of rather greater interest: 卍 and the reverse form. Currently there is no mechanism to stop the use of the reverse form in a domain name. However, it has been referred for a policy decision. The solution may be that it is removed from the table, or an evaluation panel takes on this sort of role.

I’m back from Seoul keen to do a Korean project and have set up a Korean wiki with a colleague at SOAS: Korean Wiki

If you speak or are learning Korean and are based at UCL, I’d love to hear from you.

Pelagios and Recogito: an annotation platform for joining a linked data world

By Simon Mahony, on 12 June 2015

Digital Classicist seminar logo

This week’s Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar:

Friday June 12th at 16:30 in Room G34, Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU

Leif Isaksen, Pau de Soto (Southampton), Elton Barker (Open
University) and Rainer Simon (Vienna):
‘Pelagios and Recogito: an annotation platform for joining a linked data world.’

This session will also be live-cast to our YouTube channel

One of the primary obstacles to conducting geospatial analysis of relevant documents (both maps and texts) is identifying the places to which they refer. Recogito is a user-friendly Web-based tool developed to enable: first the “geotagging” of place names either on maps or in digital texts; then the “georesolving” of those places to an appropriate gazetteer. Not only does this step provide geographical coordinates; by mapping to an authority file (a gazetteer), the documents are also connected to the Pelagios linked data network. All metadata are free and downloadable to the public as CSV files or maps.

The full abstract is available on the programme page.

The full 2015 programme is available on the Digital Classicist London seminar page.

Digital Classicist London 2015 seminar series

By Simon Mahony, on 4 June 2015

Digital Classicist seminar logoThe Digital Classicist London summer seminar series starts this Friday with a PhD student from UCL Ancient History.

As in previous years, the seminars will be recorded with video, audio and slides made available on the DC seminar pages. See last year’s programme. In addition the video recordings are also uploaded to the Digital Classicist London YouTube channel.

This year the seminars will also be live streamed and the link will be available on the programme page.

Seminar: From lost archives to digital databases

Friday June 5 at 16:30 in room G21A, Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU

Jen Hicks (UCL)
From lost archives to digital databases

Of the leather documents used by the administration and individuals of the Seleukid empire (ca 312- 63 BC), all that remains are the small pieces of clay that were used to seal them; these however survive in their tens of thousands in Mesopotamia and the Levant. In this paper I will consider the potential and limitations of using these lumps of mud, through the construction of digital databases and statistical analysis, to reconstruct these lost archives, and to understand the imperial structures of the Seleukid power.

The full abstract is available on the programme page.
The seminar will be followed by wine and refreshments.

ALL WELCOME

The full 2015 programme is available on the Digital Classicist London seminar page.

Digital Classicist London seminars 2015

By Simon Mahony, on 12 May 2015

digiclas

The programme for the Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Summer 2015 seminar series is now published.

Meetings are on Fridays at 16:30 in room G21A (except where otherwise specified), Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU.

Full listings together with abstracts are available on the Digital Classicist seminar page.

All are welcome and no registration is needed.

UCLDH5: The First Susan Hockey Lecture in Digital Humanities

By Sarah Davenport, on 25 February 2015

susan-hockey-lecture-darkpurpleThe UCL Centre for Digital Humanities was founded in 2010, and to celebrate the achievements of the centre over the last five years we are launching a named lecture series, The Susan Hockey Lecture in Digital Humanities. We are especially pleased to announce that Professor Susan Hockey will be giving the inaugural lecture.

Digital Humanities: Perspectives on Past, Present and Future

Wednesday 27 May, 6pm

Sir Ambrose Fleming Lecture Theare, Roberts Building, UCL

In our first installment of the series, Professor Susan Hockey discusses the trajectory of digital humanities from its many years on the fringes to its current position at the centre of the humanities scholarly arena, and its future challenges. Today, conferences, courses and publications in digital humanities abound, and jobs are advertised almost every week. The advent of the World Wide Web shifted emphasis from analytical software to communication and publication tools bringing humanities resources to a much wider audience in classrooms and in the home. The groundwork for many of these new ways of working is in place now. Some time in the future, humanities information sources will be mainly digital. What are the implications of a much broader user community for these resources, and for libraries and archives, the traditional custodians of humanities information sources? How can research in digital humanities contribute to future developments? And what should our students learn in order to build successfully on what has already been achieved?

All welcome, the lecture will be followed by a drinks reception in the Roberts Foyer.  Please note that registration is required.

 

Seminar: The Europeana network of Ancient Greek and Latin Epigraphy (EAGLE) and Linked Open Data

By Simon Mahony, on 30 June 2014

digiclas

This week’s Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar:Pietro Liuzzo (Heidelberg)

‘The Europeana network of Ancient Greek and Latin Epigraphy (EAGLE) and Linked Open Data’.

Friday July 4th at 16:30 in room 102 (Athlone), Senate House, Malet Street, WC1E 7HU

The Europeana network of Ancient Greek and Latin Epigraphy aims to provide historians and the general public with a curated online multi-text edition which has high quality contents and related contents as well as high quality data in multiple interoperable formats. Linked Open Data principles aim at bringing things together so we have tried to follow those guidelines. EAGLE considered two standards: TEI – EpiDoc and CIDOC CRM and we work towards tools to facilitate wilful alignment as well as coordinated linking via third parties annotations or through the alignment to common vocabularies (of contents), gazetteers and bibliographies.

Full abstract is available.

The seminar will be followed by wine and refreshments.

ALL WELCOME

The full 2014 programme is at the Digital Classicist.

Seminar: The Leipzig Open Fragmentary Texts Series and Digital Fragmenta Historicorum Graecorum Projects

By Simon Mahony, on 23 June 2014

digiclas

Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2014

Monica Berti, Greta Franzini & Simona Stoyanova (Leipzig)
‘The Leipzig Open Fragmentary Texts Series and Digital Fragmenta Historicorum Graecorum Projects’

Friday June 27 at 16:30 in room G37, Senate House, Malet Street, WC1E 7HU

The Leipzig Open Fragmentary Texts Series (LOFTS) is a new collaborative project that seeks to create open electronic editions of ancient works that survive only through quotations and text re-uses in later texts. The large diversity and dispersion of these materials entreats a dynamic infrastructure which fully supports and represents the relationships between sources, citations and annotations. LOFTS links fragments to the source text from which they are drawn, and aligns them to multiple editions and translations, thus providing an enhanced understanding of the fragmentary textual heritage it showcases.

Full abstract

The seminar will be followed by wine and refreshments.

ALL WELCOME

The full 2014 programme is available on the Digital Classicist website.

Digital Classicist London Seminars

By Simon Mahony, on 9 June 2014

digiclas

This week’s seminar in the 2014 Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies series.

Victoria Moul & Charlotte Tupman (King’s College London)
‘Neo-Latin poetry in English manuscripts, 1550-1700′

Friday June 13 at 16:30 in room 103 (Holden), Senate House, Malet Street, WC1E 7HU

This paper discusses a proposed project to examine the role and significance of the large quantities of neo-Latin poetry composed and circulated within the thriving manuscript culture of early modern England (c. 1550-1700). It will produce a searchable digital edition of representative examples of early modern Latin poetry in English manuscripts, and a body of print publications analysing this almost unstudied wealth of material. We address the typical genres and forms of neo-Latin poetry in manuscript and how they are used; the relationship between original Latin and English poetry in manuscript sources; and the political significance of such poetry.

Full abstract
The seminar will be followed by wine and refreshments.

ALL WELCOME

The full 2014 programme is on the Digital Classicist website.

Digital Classicist London Seminars

By Simon Mahony, on 2 June 2014

The first of this Summer’s Digital Classicist & Institute of Classical Studies seminars is this Friday.

Ségolène Tarte (Oxford)
‘On Cognition and the Digital in the Study of Ancient Textual Artefacts’
 
Friday June 6 at 16:30 in room 103 (Holden), Senate House, Malet Street, WC1E 7HU

Scholars studying Ancient Textual Artefacts endeavour to create knowledge through the decipherment, transcription, transliteration, edition, commentary, and contextualization of textual artefacts, thereby transforming data and information into knowledge and meaning.  Their task is hence intrinsically interpretative, and relies heavily on the mobilization of both perceptual and conceptual cognitive processes. This talk will present a number of conceptual and perceptual processes that were identified through ethnographic studies of scholars at work and linked to the cognitive sciences literature. Some show embodied cognition at work, others show the role of unconscious knowledge in the act of interpretation of Ancient Textual Artefacts.

Full abstract

The seminar will be followed by wine and refreshments.

ALL WELCOME

The full 2014 programme is available on the Digital Classicist website