Seminar: DAMOS – Database of Mycenaean at Oslo

By Simon Mahony, on 28 July 2015

digiclas

Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2015

Friday July 31 at 16:30 in room G21A, Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU

Federico Aurora (Oslo): ‘DAMOS – Database of Mycenaean at Oslo’

DĀMOS is an annotated corpus of all the published Mycenaean texts, allowing for a corpus linguistics approach to the study of the earliest attested Greek dialect. Text files, reproducing the most updated editions of the texts, have been imported into a relational database (MySql) and are now being annotated for morphology, syntax and lexical information. Noteworthy is that DĀMOS allows for storing multiple, competing analyses of a given linguistic unity (e.g. a word). A rich set of metadata, including – automatically imported – detailed epigraphical information, is also available for searches and can, thus, be crossed with linguistic data. Online edition.

2MY Oi 704 (Mycenae)

ALL WELCOME

The seminar will be followed by wine and refreshments.

The full abstract is available on the seminar programme page.

The full 2015 programme is available on the Digital Classicist London seminar page.

Seminar: A Collection of Greek Ritual Norms (CGRN)

By Simon Mahony, on 21 July 2015

Digital Classicist seminar logo

Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2015

Friday July 24 at 16:30 in room G21A, Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU

Saskia Peels (Liège): ‘A Collection of Greek Ritual Norms Project (CGRN)’

This talk presents the project A Collection of Greek Ritual Norms, abbreviated CGRN (University of Liège). The CGRN is an online collection and database of over 200 Greek inscriptions with a religious subject matter, notably normative texts concerning sacrifice and purification. Using the EpiDoc XML standard, we have lemmatized the inscriptions and encoded geographic, chronological and thematic information, so that this corpus will be searchable in many different ways. Thus, our website serves not only scholars wanting to study individual inscriptions, but we hope that our tool may further our understanding of what are usually called ‘sacred laws’ more generally.

CGRN-project

As always the seminar will be followed by discussion over wine and refrshments.

ALL WELCOME

The full abstract is available on the seminar programme page.

The full 2015 programme is available on the Digital Classicist London seminar page.

 

Digital Classicist seminar: Integrating Digital Epigraphies (IDEs)

By Simon Mahony, on 14 July 2015

Digital Classicist seminar logoDigital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2015

Friday July 17th at 16:30, in Room G21A, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU

Hugh Cayless (Duke)

‘Integrating Digital Epigraphies (IDEs)’

 

Integrating Digital Epigraphies (IDEs) is being developed as a Linked Data platform for digital epigraphy. The first round of development leverages data from partner projects including the PHI’s Searchable Greek Inscriptions project, the SEG, the Claros concordance of epigraphical publication data, and epigraphy articles in JSTOR to develop a set of web services. Identifiers from any of the projects may be used to retrieve related data from any of the others. The goal of IDEs is not to be a portal or aggregator superseding partner projects, but a data hub that allows all of them to leverage each other’s work.

500x375

As always the seminar will be followed by discussion over wine and refrshments.

ALL WELCOME

The full abstract is available on the seminar programme page.

The full 2015 programme is available on the Digital Classicist London seminar page.

UCLDH academic promotions

By Sarah Davenport, on 10 July 2015

We’re very pleased to announce that many of our UCLDH team members have been successful in the 2014-15 round of academic promotions!

– Tim Weyrich, Deputy Director of UCLDH, has been promoted to Professor of Visual Computing

– Julianne Nyhan, Oliver Duke Williams and Antonis Bikakis have all been promoted to Senior Lecturer

Many congratulations to all, very well deserved. All positions are effective as of 1st October 2015

 

Seminar:

By Simon Mahony, on 7 July 2015

Digital Classicist seminar logoDigital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2015

Friday July 10th at 16:30 in room G21A, Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU

Monica Berti (Leipzig), Gregory R. Crane (Tufts & Leipzig), Kenny Morrell (Center for Hellenic Studies)

‘Sunoikisis DC – An International Consortium of Digital Classics Programs’Berti_Image

Sunoikisis DC is an international consortium of Digital Classics programs developed by the Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities at the University of Leipzig in collaboration with the Harvard’s Center for Hellenic Studies. Sunoikisis DC aims at reaching a global audience and offers collaborative courses that foster interdisciplinary paradigms of learning and allow students of both the humanities and computer science to work together by contributing to digital classics projects in a collaborative environment. The goal of this talk is to present the activities of the consortium and its results.

As always the seminar will be followed by discussion over wine and refrshments.

ALL WELCOME

The full abstract is available on the seminar programme page.

The full 2015 programme is available on the Digital Classicist London seminar page.

How well do Google image results represent reality?

By Oliver W Duke-Williams, on 23 June 2015

Much has been written about Sir Tim Hunt’s remarks at the World Conference of Science Journalists in Seoul earlier this month. The debate has developed in a number of directions, including a discussion about the gender representation in images returned by Google’s image search, with a specific example being made of the male-dominated results when using the search term ‘professor’. Writing in The Guardian, Dame Athene Donald observed:

If you think that doesn’t matter, imagine you are a 12-year-old girl trying to get a sense of what the adult professional world is like. If the only images that appear against the search term of “professor” are either elderly white males or cartoons of men in white coats with sticking-up hair, as a girl you are hardly likely to think it is the sort of career aspiration you should be considering.

The representation of ‘professor’ is of course problematic in a number of ways: as well as being shown as male, professors are also shown as sterotypically balding and bespectacled. Similarly stereotype-driven images are de rigeur in children’s literature, as documented by Professor Melissa Terras. A natural response to this observation is to wonder what the gender representation of other jobs looks like through the prism of Google Images. Are they similarly one-sided? For example, although the Women’s World Cup is under way at the time of writing, searching for ‘footballer’ returns an entirely male set of results. As with the case for professors, this would not encourage a girl to think that football is a sport for all.

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Digital Classicist seminar: dissertation special

By Simon Mahony, on 23 June 2015

Digital Classicist seminar logoDigital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2015

Friday June 26th at 16:30, in Room G31, Foster Court, Malet Place, WC1E 6BT

The seminar this week features Digital Humanities / Digital Classics MA and MSc students from both UCL and KCL giving short presentations on their dissertation research. Two are on the MA/MSc DH programme and one on MSc IS.

Note the different location as this week’s seminar is in room G31 at Foster Court.

As always this will be followed by wine and refreshments and all are welcome.

Emma King (KCL): ‘Strand Lane Baths 1776-1778: 3D modelling historic spaces’

Lauren Knight (KCL): ‘The City of London as a Museum’

Ioanna Kyvernitou (UCL): ‘Reconstructing a historical knowledge representation of “Women” on the Semantic Web’

Argula Rublack (KCL): ‘Digitally interlinking manuscripts of the twelfth-century Arabic-Latin translation movement’

Katherine Steiner (UCL): ‘Digital methods in classical research: an EpiDoc case study’

Lucia Vannini (UCL): ‘Virtual reunification of papyrus fragments’

Abstracts are available on the programme page.

The full 2015 programme is available on the Digital Classicist London seminar page.

Seminar: Digital comparison of 19th century plaster casts and original classical sculptures.

By Simon Mahony, on 17 June 2015

Digital Classicist seminar logoDigital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2015

Friday June 19th at 16:30 in room G21A, Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU

Emma Payne (UCL Institute of Archaeology)
‘Digital comparison of 19th century plaster casts and original classical sculptures.’

The seminar will be streamed live to our YouTube Channel

Historical casts of classical sculptures can now function as important archaeological records, sometimes containing archaeological information now lost from originals. However, it was not unknown for 19th century plaster craftsmen to doctor their moulds, such that when cast, a damaged sculpture would appear more complete. To determine the type and usefulness of information present in casts, 3D scanning has been conducted at the British Museum and Acropolis Museum of casts and their corresponding originals, of sections of the Parthenon sculptures. The resulting 3D images are now being produced and digitally compared to facilitate interpretation of these objects and their significances.

As always the seminar will be followed by discussion over wine and refrshments.

ALL WELCOME

The full abstract is available on the programme page.

The full 2015 programme is available on the Digital Classicist London seminar page.

Hangeul and hanja in domain names

By Chris J Dillon, on 17 June 2015

King Sejong

King Sejong stands in the middle of Sejong St in front of the Sejong Cultural Center in Seoul. Obviously a key historical figure, then. He was behind the creation of the Korean “hangeul” script in the mid-15th Century. It was done scientifically, so that many consonants were pictures of where they are articulated and are systematically related to similar consonants. So ㄱ, g is related to ㅋ, k with the additional dash and to ㄲ, kk by duplication. ㄲ, incidentally, represents a tense k sound which may be unique to the Korean language. The vowels are a system of dots and dashes, and so ㅣ is i and ㅏ is a.

I was in Seoul for the ICANN Variant Issues Project meeting on the Chinese, Japanese and Korean Label Generation Rules (i.e. which characters should be allowed in Top Level labels). China made huge progress early on and Japan has caught up. Korea has not used Chinese characters, “hanja”, much for several decades but is keen to be able to use them for business reasons – .現代 “Hyundai” would be a lot more widely understood in East Asia than the hangeul way of writing it: .현대.

Just before the meeting I had decided to read through the proposed Japanese table and found various things I shan’t trouble you with – I learnt at an early age that linguists’ ideas of “interesting” don’t necessarily correspond with those of non-linguists’. Then I found something of rather greater interest: 卍 and the reverse form. Currently there is no mechanism to stop the use of the reverse form in a domain name. However, it has been referred for a policy decision. The solution may be that it is removed from the table, or an evaluation panel takes on this sort of role.

I’m back from Seoul keen to do a Korean project and have set up a Korean wiki with a colleague at SOAS: Korean Wiki

If you speak or are learning Korean and are based at UCL, I’d love to hear from you.

Pelagios and Recogito: an annotation platform for joining a linked data world

By Simon Mahony, on 12 June 2015

Digital Classicist seminar logo

This week’s Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar:

Friday June 12th at 16:30 in Room G34, Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU

Leif Isaksen, Pau de Soto (Southampton), Elton Barker (Open
University) and Rainer Simon (Vienna):
‘Pelagios and Recogito: an annotation platform for joining a linked data world.’

This session will also be live-cast to our YouTube channel

One of the primary obstacles to conducting geospatial analysis of relevant documents (both maps and texts) is identifying the places to which they refer. Recogito is a user-friendly Web-based tool developed to enable: first the “geotagging” of place names either on maps or in digital texts; then the “georesolving” of those places to an appropriate gazetteer. Not only does this step provide geographical coordinates; by mapping to an authority file (a gazetteer), the documents are also connected to the Pelagios linked data network. All metadata are free and downloadable to the public as CSV files or maps.

The full abstract is available on the programme page.

The full 2015 programme is available on the Digital Classicist London seminar page.