A A A

E-Resource of the month – The Cochrane Library

By Abir Mukherjee, on 10 April 2014

cclogo70x82With recent medical interest in topical Cochrane Reviews, this month’s timely E-Resource of the Month post is about the Cochrane Library. As with the other e-resources described, the database can be accessed on site or remotely by UCL Students and Staff via the Library Homepage and Explore by choosing ”Find Databases” at the top of the page.

What is it?

The Cochrane Library is a source of full-text information on the effects of interventions in health care. As a key evidence-based medicine resource, it comprises of  six databases of different types of high-quality, independent evidence to inform healthcare decision-making, and a seventh database that provides information about groups in The Cochrane Collaboration.

Search guides are available here or via the Cruciform Wiki.

How do I access it?

Via the UCL Library webpages and Explore either through UCL desktops or remotely (UCL computer ID and password required when prompted if accessing remotely). From the Library homepage, “Finding databases” can be selected from the tabs at the top. Cochrane Library can be then be found alphabetically or by choosing it from the “Biomedicine and Health” options from the drop-down list.

Citations and why they matter

By Abir Mukherjee, on 8 April 2014

120864373This blog post is a very abbreviated introduction to bibliometrics to support biomedical researchers at UCL.

As a basic concept, bibliometrics involves taking a closer look at the number of citations an article may have. It can be used to measure the impact of

 

 

  • individual articles
  • groups of articles (eg. the work of a particular author or institution)
  • particular publications (eg. journals)

Applications include seeing if an article has gained much attention or who is citing your own research:

  • Assess the impact and activity of other researchers
  • How many papers have been published and are they cited?
  • Have they been publishing recently?
  • Output and impact of an institution or research group

Some tools for bibliometrics, available through UCL Library Services include:

  • Web of Science (including Journal Citation Reports, Essential Science Indicators, Biosis)
  • SCOPUS
  • OrcID

Future posts will look at bibliometrics in more detail and using some of the tools described above. Comprehensive support for UCL researchers from UCL Library Services is also available at http://www.ucl.ac.uk/library/research-support.

Finding the right biomedical database

By Abir Mukherjee, on 28 March 2014

LineDrawingManComputer

As our “7 Databases in 7 days” lunch-time sessions draw to a close, and whilst some Cruciform Library users will already be familiar with the range of  databases available via UCL,  this blog post aims to provide an overview of some key biomedical databases and their main area of focus.

PubMed /  Medline – the starting point for most biomedical searches, covering medicine, nursing,dentistry, veterinary medicine, the health care system, and the preclinical sciences.

Embase - comprehensive pharmacological and biomedical database renowned for extensive indexing of drug information.

PsycInfo – resources in the field of psychology.

CINAHL –  nursing and allied health.

AMED – complementary medicine.

Web of Science – sciences, social sciences, and arts and humanities.

Scopus – biomedical, sciences, social sciences.

Cochrane Library – collection of medical databases including systematic reviews and clinical trials.

How do I access these databases?

As with other e-resorces at UCL, access for UCL Students and Staff is through the Library pages > Electronic resources > Databases and choosing the title from the alphabetical list. Remote access for UCL students and staff may require entering in ISD login details when prompted whilst NHS/UCLH users can access these resources via Explore machines at UCL library sites.

7 databases in 7 days

By Abir Mukherjee, on 19 March 2014

7databasesIn7daysFrom Thursday 20 March to Friday 28 March the Cruciform Library will be hosting “7 Databases in 7 days” – a series of lunch-time 15 minute drop-in sessions as well as guides to pick up for some of our popular biomedical e-Resources.

Broadly speaking, the sessions will highlight familiar (and not-so-familiar)  biomedical databases as well as more general online clinical resources and online point of care tools. Come and pick up a leaflet, free pen or find out more about further help with e-Resources:-

Thursday 20 March  -  Web of Science  -  12.30

Friday 21 March  -  Scopus  -  12.30

Monday 24 March  -  Clinical Key  -  12.00

Tuesday 25 March  -  Health Talk Online  -  13.30

Wednesday 26 March  -  BMJ Best Practice -  12.30

Thursday 27 March  -  UpToDate  -  12.30

Friday 28 March  -  PubMed / Medline  -  12.30

The sessions will take place at the Cruciform Enquiry Desk area (subject to numbers) on the second floor of UCL Science Library.

 

 

 

 

 

Drop-in iSkills lunch-time sessions

By Abir Mukherjee, on 13 March 2014

Wordle: Cruci_Skills

For UCL researchers and students in a rush with looming deadlines or busy lecture timetables,  as well as the advertised Cruciform training schedule, viewable at  www.ucl.ac.uk/cruciwik -  why not come to the drop-in lunch-time sessions for help with refining biomedical literature searches or eResources.

The trial lunch-time mini drop-in iSkills sessions (about 20 mins) are available every Thursday between 12.30 and 14:00! No need to book – just ask at the Cruciform Enquiry Desk (in the office next to the Cruciform Reading Room in the temporary location on the second floor of UCL Science Library) for ad hoc help with literature searches or arrange a suitable time (or email lib-crucienq@ucl.ac.uk ) if you feel that you need to book a longer session or attend one of the more comprehensive advertised sessions.

Patient information sources for medical students

By Abir Mukherjee, on 12 March 2014

Picture1

This month some of the resources that will be focused on in the Cruciform library iSkills blog are sources of patient information that UCL Medical Students may recall from their MBBS Year 2 Information Skills lectures as part of their Vertical Modules. Shared decision-making is very high on the government agenda at the moment as it benefits the patient and the health organisation in terms of well-being, service improvement, and cost efficiency.

HealthTalkOnline is a collection of patient experiences systematically collated by the Health Experiences Research Group at the University of Oxford. The high quality evidence-based resource that has been awarded a Dept of Health Information Standard,  covers patient experience of more than fifty conditions as well as qualitative research and patient feedback and follows a consistent structure. The patient experiences include video and audio media clips.

The accompanying website is Youth HealthTalk Online http://www.youthhealthtalk.org   with experiences of young people and health.

Easter opening hours at the Cruciform Library

By Abir Mukherjee, on 12 March 2014

A quick reminder for Cruciform readers of our opening hours over Easter 2014.

Throughout Easter, normal 24 hour opening applies, except for the following:
Dates Details
Thursday 17th April Close at 21:00 (Issue Desk 11:00-17:45, self-service until 20:45)
Friday 18th – Monday 21st April LIBRARY CLOSED
Tuesday 22nd April Re-open 08:45, resume 24 hour opening (Issue Desk 11:00-17:45)

The UCL Library pages also contain up to date opening hours for all the Library sites over the Easter period (including  Library sites services on Thursday 17th and Tuesday 22nd April ) at: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/library/opening.shtml

  • Several libraries will maintain their normal ‘out of hours’ reference access for already-registered users, across the Easter period; and
  • On the central campus the JBR, Graduate Hub, Research Grid and Medical Students’ Hub learning spaces will all stay open for 24 hours throughout the whole of Easter, without closing at all.

Study spaces during the Cruciform Hub building works

By Abir Mukherjee, on 5 March 2014

This month, as well as our usual features on resources, we have a summary reminding Cruciform readers of alternative venues where they can study or work during the continued Cruciform Hub building works.

proxy UCL medical students, postgraduate students and staff are welcome to study at any of the UCL libraries. Addresses and opening hours  can be found at www.ucl.ac.uk/library/sites . For Cruciform Library users in Bloomsbury there are additional, alternative locations - www.ucl.ac.uk/library/cruciform-hub/study .

Specific locations for UCL medical  students include:

  • Science Library, DMS Watson Building, Malet Place. Cruciform Library collections and staff support are temporarily located on the 2nd floor
  • Medical Student Hub, Lower ground floor, South Wing, Wilkins Building. Study spaces with IT facilities, UCL Medical Students only.
  • JBS Haldane Hub, Anatomy Building, Gower Street. Social study space with IT facilities
  • Jeremy Bentham Room, Ground Floor, Wilkins Building. Social study space
  • Bloomsbury Healthcare Library, Bonham Carter House, 52 Gower Street. Available for reference use weekdays 10:00-17:30 by UCL Medical Students until the Cruciform Hub opens

UCL Postgraduate students and Staff are reminded of the following locations as well:

  • Science Library, DMS Watson Building, Malet Place. Cruciform Library collections and dedicated staff support are located on the 2nd floor
  • Research Grid, South Junction, Wilkins Building. Access for UCL post-graduate students only
  • JBS Haldane Hub, Ground Floor, Anatomy building, Gower Street. Social study space with IT facilities
  • Jeremy Bentham Room, Ground Floor, Wilkins Building. Social study space

 We appreciate our readers’ continued patience during the building works. If you have any questions or concerns about the works, please don’t hesitate to email us at lib-crucienq@ucl.ac.uk.

CLINICAL KEY – TRIAL VERSION until 1st August 2014.

By Abir Mukherjee, on 20 February 2014

clinical_key  Clinical Key is described by Elsevier as a “clinical insight engine,” designed specifically to help doctors, healthcare professionals and medical students access health information efficiently from a large, comprehensive range of published material from all specialties within medicine and surgery.

As with UpToDate and DynaMed, and other clinical support tools, the content is designed to help clinicians whether they are treating and diagnosing patients, staying current in their field, or preparing patient care plans. To access full features, an individual account needs to be created (see http://blogs.ucl.ac.uk/library-ejournal/files/2014/01/ClinicalKey.pdf ) – allowing searches to be saved; reading lists /saved images for presentations and the ClincalKey  app for mobile devices.

Key features include:-

  • related content suggestions from original search query
  • filtering results by subcategory (e.g. content type, specialty, publication date, study type such as systematic reviews or randomized control trials).
  •  ‘First Consult’ point-of-care  & ‘Procedures Consult’ video resources
  • ‘Vitals’ content from review articles in the Medical and Surgical Clinics of North America.
  • Over 3,000 Clinical Pharmacology drug monographs from Gold Standard.
  • More than 20 million Medline abstracts from PubMed.

Additional features include a collection of images; guidelines; clinical trials info; training videos and patient education leaflets. Subscription to this trial version is until 1st August 2014 and as with other eResources it can be accessed from the Find Databases page via UCL Libraries / Explore.

e-Resource of the Month – Scopus

By Abir Mukherjee, on 10 February 2014

The Cruciform Library’s recommendation for E-Resource of the Month for February  is the Scopus database, which has recently undergone a redesign of its user interface, hopefully making it easier to use.  As with the other e-resources described, the database can be accessed on site or remotely by UCL Students and Staff via the Library Homepage and Explore by choosing ”Find Databases” at the top of the page.

 What is it?

Similar in function to Web of Science,  Elsevier’s website defines Scopus as the ‘largest abstract and citation database of peer-reviewed literature with bibliometric tools to track, analyze and visualize research.” Whilst still combining biomedical journal articles with social science articles and citation analysis, new features include one-click export to Mendeley and updated Author profiles. A video guide for searching on the new interface can be found here .

 How do I access it?

Via the UCL Library webpages and Explore either through UCL desktops or remotely (UCL computer ID and password required when prompted if accessing remotely). From the Library homepage, “Finding databases” can be selected from the tabs at the top. Scopus can be then be found alphabetically or by choosing it from the “Biomedicine and Health” options from the drop-down list.