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Newsletter 42

By Alexander Samson, on 15 October 2013

 

  1. Lecture series on Shakespeare and the Classical Tradition by Professor Jonathan Bate FBA CBE, Provost of Worcester College, Oxford,  to be held at the Warburg Institute.
  2. 400 anniversary Heythrop  College Conference to be held at Senate House in June 2014. Jesuit Educational Tradition, 19 – 20th June, 2014. CFP and further details click on link.
  3. Call for Papers – Rites and Rituals. Papers must be between 3,000 – 5,000 words in length, formatted according to MLA guidelines. Please email your paper, a short abstract and your academic CV in separate, clearly labelled DOC(X). files to editors@forumjournal.org by Monday 16th September 2013. All eligible articles will be peer reviewed prior to publication. Only one submission per author per issue is permissible. FORUM journal is a postgraduate journal for arts and culture based at the University of Edinburgh. For more information and style guidelines, visit www.forumjournal.org
  4. CFP Warwick University. ‘Laughter & Satire in Europe 1500-1800’ is an interdisciplinary conference to be held 26-27th May 2014 in Venice. The deadline for submitting paper proposals (up to 300 words) is 13th January 2014. Proposals should be submitted to Adam.Morton@warwick.ac.uk.
  5. Call for Papers for a conference on ‘Early Modern Women, Religion and the Body’ at Loughborough University on 22-23 July 2014. 300 word abstracts to Rachel Adcock, Sara Read and Anna Ziomek at emwomen@lboro.ac.uk by 31st January 2014.
  6. Call for Papers: early modern soundscapes Early Modern Soundscapes Thursday 24th – Friday 25th April 2014 Bangor University. We welcome abstracts of not more than 250 words for twenty-minute papers, or proposals for panels comprising three papers, to be sent to Rachel Willie (r.willie@bangor.ac.uk) by December 1st 2013.
  7. Call for Articles for Journal of Northern Renaissance: Numbers in Early Modern Writing. Submission deadline: 1 December 2013  Estimated date of publication: September 2014. This issue will be guest-edited by Dr Katherine Hunt and Rebecca Tomlin. Enquiries regarding possible contributions can be sent to northernrenaissance+numbers@gmail.com.
  8. Low Countries History Seminars, IHR, 2013 – 14.
  9. Essex: The cultural impact of an Elizabethan courtier. One-Day Symposium Saturday 26th October, 12-4.30pm Sheffield Hallam University, Room 9003, Cantor Building, City Campus. There is no registration fee and refreshments will be provided, but we do require you to e-mail us in advance to book a place: A.F.Connolly@shu.ac.uk

  10. 12th ESSE Conference in Kosice, Slovakia, Friday 29 August – Tuesday 2 September, 2014. Seminar on English manuscript studies. Please send your proposals to: Carlo Bajetta (Università della Valle d’Aosta, Italy) carlo.bajetta@univda.it and Guillaume Coatalen (Université de Cergy-Pontoise, France) guillaumecoatalen@hotmail.com.
  11. The Women’s Studies Group 1558-1837 seminar series for the 2013-14 at www.womenstudiesgroup.org.uk
  12. Early Modern Rome 2″ in celebration of the 10th anniversary of the UCEAP “Rome Through the Ages” program, will be held from October 10-12, 2013, full details: conference.eapitaly.it
  13. The London Renaissance Seminar will meet on Saturday 19th October to discuss: Creating Early Modern Memory. 1-5pm, 43 Gordon Square, School of Arts, Birkbeck. All welcome, no registration necessary.
  14. Emma Dillon – Remembering to Forget: Music, Conversion, and the Early Cistercian Experience Tuesday 1st October 2013 5pm, ArtsTwo Room 3.16, Queen Mary, University of London. Centre for Renaissance and Early Modern Studies. Attendance is free; all welcome.
  15. Horace in Renaissance France: Poetry and Scholarship The Warburg Institute, November 29th 2013 (organizers: Daniel Andersson, Ariane Schwartz)
  16. UCL’s Interdisciplinary Medieval and Renaissance Seminars http://www.ucl.ac.uk/mars/seminars-lectures/imars_13_14
  17. Coming soon to The Courtauld Gallery  The Young Dürer: Drawing the Figure  17 October 2013 – 12 January 2014
  18. Reading Conference in Early Modern Studies, 7-9 July 2014: call for papers. Proposals for either papers or panels should be sent by email to the chair of the Conference Committee, Dr. Rebecca Bullard, by 6 January 2014, r.bullard@reading.ac.uk
  19. Text and Book in the Age of Swift. A day conference on 23 November 2013, St Peter’s College Oxford.
  20. Call for Papers for the Second Annual Postgraduate Renaissance Symposium: The Visual Arts and Music in Renaissance Europe c.1400 – 1650, which will take place at The Courtauld on Saturday 18 January 2014 Please send proposals of no more than 250 words and your academic CV by 4 November 2013 to renaissanceartandmusic@gmail.com
  21. Warburg Institute complete Annual Programme available at: http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/fileadmin/images/events/AnnualProgramme2013_14.pdf
  22. Two Calleva Centre three-year Postdoctoral Research Associates developing experimental and text-based research on the psychology of the audience, with particular reference to classical Greek and early modern English drama, Magdalen College (University of Oxford). Application forms and further particulars, which include information on how to apply, are available at www.magd.ox.ac.uk/vacancies/ . The deadline for applications is UK time 12 noon on 1 November 2013.
  23. CFP. British Branch of the International Courtly Literature Society (ICLS) University of Exeter, Monday 14th and Tuesday 15th April, 2014. Proposals for papers of 25 minutes in length in any area of the Society’s interests are invited from the membership. Please send these to Dr Emma Cayley by email (e.j.cayley@exeter.ac.uk) or hard copy by 15th December 2013.

  24. History of Pre-Modern Medicine seminar series returns this autumn.  The 2013-14 series is organised by a group of historians of medicine based at London universities and hosted by the Wellcome Library.
  25. The Gothic Ivories team is delighted to announce that 700 ‘new’ ivory carvings from over 60 different collections are now available online as part of the Gothic Ivories website! (www.gothicivories.courtauld.ac.uk)
  26. INSTITUTE OF HISTORICAL RESEARCH Society, Culture and Belief, 1500-1800, Seminar Series 2013 – 14.

  27. Call for book proposals: Literary & Scientific Cultures of Early Modernity, details here: http://www.ashgate.com/LITSCI. To submit a proposal, or for more information, please contact: Erika Gaffney, Publishing Manager,egaffney@ashgate.com.
  28. Centre for Editing Lives and Letters Director’s Seminar schedule: http://www.livesandletters.ac.uk/?q=content/directors-seminar
  29. Hugh Trevor-Roper Centenary Conference 11 January 2014: Update.
  30. Collegial Communities in Exile Conference: New histories of the Irish, English, Scots, Dutch and other colleges founded on the continent in the early modern period. Mary Immaculate College, University of Limerick, Ireland ― 19-20 June 2014. For more information: http://colleges2014.wordpress.com/
  31. One day colloquium being hosted at Queen Mary, University of London on Saturday 7 December, 2013: ‘Reading, Writing and Religion, 1660-1830′. See colloquium website for further details: http://writingandreligion.wordpress.com/
  32. Lewis as Critic, 23rd November, 2013, Cripps Court, Magdalene College, Cambridge. In this one-day conference we will discuss the significance of C.S. Lewis’ contribution to the practice of criticism and commemorate the 50th anniversary of his death. For more information, and to register, please visit: lewisascritic.wordpress.com
  33. Please find attached and at this link details of the fifth Early Modern Symposium at the Courtauld Institute of Art on Saturday 26 October.http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/researchforum/events/2013/autumn/oct26_FifthEarlyModernSymposium.shtml
  34. Classical Philosophers in Seventeenth Century English Thought 28 May 2014, CREMS, University of York. A day symposium – abstracts by 15th December (c. 250 words). Contact: Kevin Killeen, kevin.killeen@york.ac.uk
  35. Tradescant Lecture with Karen Hearn and Jennifer Potter, 17th October 2013, Garden Museum.
  36. The Keith Walker Memorial Lecture 2013 will take place at 6.30pm on Thursday 14th November, in the Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre, UCL, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT. Professor Sir Brian Vickers (Honorary Research Professor of UCL English) will speak on “The One King Lear“.
  37. Courtauld Institute of Art 2013 autumn term programmeAll seminars are free /open to all and taking place at Somerset House, Strand, WC2R 0RN London.
  38. NEW Cultures of Knowledge Lunchtime Seminar Series: Negotiating Networks. Theme: early modern letters, networks and the digital humanities. Thursdays 1pm, 31st Oct – 5th Dec: Conference Room, Oxford e-Research Centre, Keble Road http://www.culturesofknowledge.org/?page_id=1270
  39. ‘Renaissance Loves’, London Renaissance Seminar, 9 November, 2.00pm-6.00pm, Room 124, Birkbeck College, 43 Gordon Square, London WC1.
  40. CFP. “REVISITING EARLY MODERN PROPHECIES (c.1500-c.1815)” 26–28 June, 2014  Goldsmiths, London. Proposals for 20-minute papers in English (maximum 300 words) with a short bio are invited, and should be sent by 31 October 2013 to either of the conference organisers: Dr Ariel Hessayon  a.hessayon(@gold.ac.uk) or Dr Lionel Laborie  l.laborie(@gold.ac.uk)
  41. Society for Neo-Latin Studies: Annual Lecture November 8th 5 p.m. King’s College London, Classics Department, Room B6. emeritus professor Roger p.h. Green (University of Glasgow), The Poetry of George Buchanan  1973-2023.

  42. *British Milton Seminar, 19 October 2013: Programme*. Venue: In the Birmingham and Midland Institute [**PLEASE NOTE**]. There will be two sessions, from 11.00 am to 12.30 pm and from 2.00 pm to 4.00 pm. You can follow the British Milton Seminar at: http://britishmiltonseminar
  43. The first SOAS Research Seminar in Islamic Art of this year takes place on Thursday 24th October, at 5.30 in B111 (as usual). I am pleased to welcome Dr Martínez-de-Castilla-Muñoz, visiting fellow from the University Complutense of Madrid. Looking forward to seeing you there. SIXTEENTH CENTURY BINDINGS IN THE WESTERN ISLAMIC WORLD.
  44. ‘Death in Scotland, from the medieval to the modern: beliefs, attitudes and practices’ (CFP, Conference, Edinburgh, 31 Jan–2 Feb 2014)
  45. Free study days being held sponsored by the Who Were the Nuns? Project: This Saturday (19th October) in Brentwood, Essex then Saturday 2 November a second event will be held in central Manchester.
  46. Seminar Series 2013-14: Travel: Bodies and Objects in Motion. Seminars will take place at Royal Holloway, 11 Bedford Square, on Wednesdays at 5pm.

 

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1.

Princeton University Press and The Warburg Institute, School of Advanced Study, University of London
E. H. GOMBRICH LECTURES ON THE CLASSICAL TRADITION 2013

ANCIENT STRENGTH
Professor Jonathan Bate FBA CBE, Provost of Worcester College, Oxford

The E. H. Gombrich Lectures is an annual series of Lectures on Aspects of the Classical Tradition, named in honour of Professor Sir Ernst Gombrich FBA OM, former Director of the Warburg Institute and Professor of the History of the Classical Tradition, University of London. The Lectures will be held at the Warburg Institute and will be published by Princeton University Press.

The inaugural series of lectures on Shakespeare and the Classical Tradition will be given by Professor Jonathan Bate, FBA CBE, Editor of Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus, co-editor of The Complete Works, The RSC Shakespeare, author of Shakespeare and OvidThe Genius of ShakespeareSoul of the Age (and many other books) and co-organiser of the 2012 British Museum Exhibition, Shakespeare: Staging the World.

Thursday 10 October 2013, 5pm - Tragical Comical Historical Pastoral: Shakespeare and Classical Genre

Thursday 17 October 2013, 5pm - The Madness of Hercules: Shakespeare and Classical Psychology

Thursday 24 October 2013, 5pm - ‘I will read politic authors’: Shakespeare and Classical Political Thought

Each Lecture will be followed by a Reception.

Attendance is free of charge and pre-registration is not required.

 

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2.

A Celebration of the 400th Anniversary of the Foundation of Heythrop College and of the Jesuit Educational Tradition

19 – 20 June 2014

‘For the Greater Glory of God and the More Universal Good’: A Celebration of the 400th Anniversary of the Foundation of  Heythrop College and of the Jesuit Educational Tradition

Institute of English Studies, Senate House, University of London

CALL FOR PAPERS

During the academic year 2013-2014, Heythrop College will celebrate the 400th anniversary of its foundation by the English Jesuits in Louvain in 1614.  To commemorate this notable anniversary, Heythrop College and the Institute of English Studies of the University of London are organising a conference which will explore the character and significance of the Jesuit educational tradition, with respect both to the study of theology and philosophy and to science, letters and the arts.

Abstracts of no more than 350 words should be submitted by Friday 15 November 2013. Acceptances will be sent out by Friday 29 November 2013.

Please email abstracts and a cover sheet including your name, university, contact information, plus a brief biographical paragraph about your academic interests to  Dr Thomas M. McCoog  (tmmccoog@gmail.com)  and Dr Francesca Bugliani Knox (f.knox@heythrop.ac.uk).

 

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3.

FORUM Journal: Issue 17

Call for Papers – Rites and Rituals

Rituals exist as a result of the actions of specific people or institutions; we recognise those rituals because they are engrained in our cultural customs as much as they are ordained by law. The resulting rituals not only reinforce the beliefs or values of these specific communities, but simultaneously define these group identities. Victor Turner describes  rituals  as  ‘social  dramas’  that allow  any  given culture to maintain a balance between structurally enforced norms and personal autonomy; the medieval carnival with its Lord of Misrule, for example, permitted a short period of topsy-turvy, upside-down role-play in popular culture, to ensure social hierarchies and authority were obeyed and enforced during the rest of the year.

Mary Ann McGrath states that there are four basic factors that form the ritual arena: the ritual artefacts (costumes, food, or decorations), the ritual script (written or oral), the ritual norm (a model or an example), and the ritual meaning (the reason or importance). However, where one or more of these basic factors are missing, questions arise as to the efficacy and stability of the ritual, leading to the subversion of the old ritual and invention of the new. This has led Stanley J. Tambiah and Richard Schechner –amongst others – to consider the performativity of rituals; the circumstances of the creation of ritual, the intent of the ritual performers, and the behaviour of the ritual witnesses. As the melancholy Jacques  declares,  “All  the  world’s  a  stage/  And  all  the  men  and  women  merely  players;/   They  have  their  exits  and  their  entrances;/  And  one  man  in  his  time  plays  many  parts”  (AYLI  2:7).

We are seeking submissions from a range of disciplines relating to the arts, culture or social sciences that consider the topic of RITES & RITUALS for issue 17 of FORUM. Submissions may relate to, but are not limited to:

- literary and film representations of rituals
- performance and performativity of rituals
- subversive ritual in cultural and aesthetic theory
- national vs. parochial identity and rituals
- construction and innovation of new ritual forms
- primitive vs. modern ritual
- ethics of ritual destruction or enforcement
- the sacred and secular ritual divide
- ritual and gender

Papers must be between 3,000 – 5,000 words in length, formatted according to MLA guidelines. Please email your paper, a short abstract and your academic CV in separate, clearly labelled DOC(X). files to editors@forumjournal.org by Monday 16th September 2013. All eligible articles will be peer reviewed prior to publication. Only one submission per author per issue is permissible.

FORUM journal is a postgraduate journal for arts and culture based at the University of Edinburgh. For more information and style guidelines, visit www.forumjournal.org.

 Victoria Anker and Laura Chapot, Co-Editors
Forum: Postgraduate Journal of Culture & the Arts
The University of Edinburghhttp://www.forumjournal.org/

The current issue of Forum on ‘Un/Natural Histories’ is available on our website now!

 

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4.

CFP ‘Laughter & Satire in Europe 1500-1800’ is an interdisciplinary conference to be held 26-27th May 2014. The conference is being organized by the Department of History at the University of Warwick (by Dr. Adam Morton and Prof. Mark Knights) and will take place in Venice at the Palazzo Persaro-Papafava:

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/international/world/venice/

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/emforum/events/laughterconference

The deadline for submitting paper proposals (up to 300 words) is 13th January 2014. Proposals should be submitted to Adam.Morton@warwick.ac.uk.

 

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5.

Call for Papers for a conference on ‘Early Modern Women, Religion and the Body’ at Loughborough University on 22-23 July 2014.

300 word abstracts to Rachel Adcock, Sara Read and Anna Ziomek at emwomen@lboro.ac.uk by 31st January 2014.

 

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 6.

Call for Papers: early modern soundscapes

Early Modern Soundscapes

Thursday 24th – Friday 25th April 2014

Bangor University

To include the Society for Renaissance Studies Annual Welsh Lecture, given by Professor Jennifer Richards (Newcastle University) and Professor Richard Wistreich (Royal Northern College of Music)

The Difficulty of that language is not to bee conceived, and the reasons thereof are especially two:

First, because it hath no affinitie with any other that ever I heard.

Secondly, because it consisteth not so much of words and Letters, as of tunes and uncouth sounds, that no letters can expresse.

For you have few words, but they signifie divers and severall things, and they are distinguished onely by their tunes that are as it were sung in the utterance of them, yet many words there are consisteth of tunes onely, so as if they like they will utter their mindes by tunes without wordes

Francis Godwin, The Man in the Moone (1638)

Early modern culture was awash with sounds.  From psalm singing to tavern songs to the reading of the riot act or town criers announcing noteworthy news, we are presented with an image of oral culture forming the basis of perpetual interaction between individuals and their communities.  Music, in particular, forms a backdrop to the soundscape, negotiating abstract sounds and speech.  This two-day symposium will interrogate ways of conceiving the early modern soundscape.   Topics might include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Sounds and space
  • Sounds sacred
  • Sounds profane
  • Civic noise
  • Imagined soundscapes
  • Interaction between sound and speech communities
  • Oral and literate cultures
  • Music and performance culture
  • Sounds and medicine
  • Sounds and the senses
  • The relationship between words and music

We welcome abstracts of not more than 250 words for twenty-minute papers, or proposals for panels comprising three papers, to be sent to Rachel Willie (r.willie@bangor.ac.uk) by December 1st 2013.

 

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 7.

Call for Papers: Numbers in Early Modern Writing

Submission deadline: 1 December 2013  Estimated date of publication: September 2014

Early modern books are full of numbers, representing both practicality and mystery. The Journal of the Northern Renaissanceinvites contributions for a special issue exploring numbers in early modern literature and textual culture. How were numbers and numerical techniques used in drama, dance, and music? What were the practical issues arising from printing numerical texts, and how were numbers represented on the page? How were the index and the cross-reference created and used? To what extent would an early modern audience recognize mathematical references in literary texts and performance? Who would buy an arithmetic book and how might they use it? Articles are invited on, but not confined to, the following subject areas:

-     Ways of counting and things to count: inventories and accounts; time and tempo; feet and metre.

-       Numbers in print: reference tables, logarithms, cross-referencing, indices.

-       Books on arithmetic, double-entry book-keeping and merchants’ handbooks.

-       Ciphering and deciphering.

-       The use of zero and other mathematical symbols in literature and drama.

-       Dance, music and other numerical art forms.

-       Making a reckoning: performing numbers on stage.

-       Numbers in the material text: ways of using numerical books, and their owners.

-       Mystical numbers, kaballah, numerology.

-       Mathematical methodologies; measuring, mapping and quantifying.

This issue will be guest-edited by Dr Katherine Hunt and Rebecca Tomlin, organisers of a conference on the topic held at Birkbeck, University of London, in May 2013, from which some of the papers are expected to be taken. Potential contributors are advised to consult the JNR web page for details of the submissions procedure and style guidelines:http://www.northernrenaissance.org/information. We also welcome initial enquiries regarding possible contributions, which can be sent to northernrenaissance+numbers@gmail.com.

 

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 8.

Seminar on Low Countries History, 2013-14 session

Convenors: Anne Goldgar (King’s College London), Ben Kaplan (UCL), Ulrich Tiedau (UCL)

Meetings: Fridays at 5:15 pm.  PLEASE NOTE: due to refurbishment work at the IHR, seminars this year meet in alternative locations – see schedule – and 15 mins later than previously.  SH Athlone = the University of London’s Senate House on Malet Street, Athlone Room, located in the South Block on the 1st floor, room 102.  SH Bedford = Senate House, Bedford Room, South Block on the ground floor, room G37.  STB 9 = Stewart House, adjacent to Senate House, at 32 Russell Square, room 9 in the basement.

Autumn Term

October 18        Timon Screech (SOAS), ‘The Dutch, the English and the Northeast

SH Athlone        Passage to Japan, 1600-1615′  (co-sponsored with Japan400)

Nov 1                 Hugh Dunthorne (Swansea), `The Revolt of the Netherlands and its

SH Athlone        impact on early modern Britain’

Nov 15               Joris van Eijnatten (Utrecht), `Willem Bilderdijk, Lord of Teisterbant:

STB 9                Metaphysics, Religion and Politics in the Age of Revolutions’

Nov 29               Guido van Meersbergen (UCL), `Diplomatic Encounters between East

SH Athlone        and West: Dutch Envoys at the Mughal Court (1648-1713)’

Spring Term

Jan 24                 Jesse Spohnholz (Washington State), `Seeing Like a Church: Solving a

SH Athlone        450-Year-Old Mystery and Rethinking the Dutch Reformation’

Feb 7                  Adrian Armstrong (Queen Mary), `Translating poetic capital in 15th-

SH Bedford        century Brussels: from Amé de Montgesoie’s Pas de la Mort to Colijn

Caillieu’s Dal sonder Wederkeeren’

Mar 7                 Martine Gosselink (Rijksmuseum), `The Rijksmuseum and its art and

SH Athlone        historical collections: a peaceful wedding?’

March 21           Mark Hay (King’s College London), `Revolutionary ideas on taxation:

SH Bedford       The Dutch fiscal policy of the period 1795-1814’

Summer Term

May 9                Liesbeth Corens (Cambridge), `Religious Coexistence in a Low

SH Athlone       Countries Health Resort: Protestants and Catholics at Spa’

June 6                Claudia Swan (Northwestern), `Piracy, Porcelain, Profit: Exotic Negoti-

SH Athlone       ations and Early Seventeenth-Century Global Politics’

 

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9.

Essex: The cultural impact of an Elizabethan courtier

One-Day Symposium

Saturday 26th October, 12-4.30pm

Sheffield Hallam University, Room 9003, Cantor Building, City Campus

This one-day symposium marks the publication of a new collection of essays about the life and cultural impact of Robert Devereux, second earl of Essex.  It brings together scholars who have been involved with the collection and whose research continues to engage with some of the issues and questions raised by their work for the volume.  The papers will consider a selection of the diverse visual and textual manifestations of Essex and his circle in poetry and portraiture, as well as in texts produced by the earl himself.

There is no registration fee and refreshments will be provided, but we do require you to e-mail us in advance to book a place: A.F.Connolly@shu.ac.uk

12 noon Arrival and Coffee

12.15 –1.15  Session One

12.15 – Welcome and Opening Remarks – Lisa Hopkins (Sheffield Hallam University)

12.30 ‘”Mine excuse must only be the worthiness of former precedents”: Gervase Markham’s English Arcadia and the Earl of Essex’s Sidneian Inheritance’. Richard Wood (Sheffield Hallam University)

1.15 Lunch 

2.15 – 3.15pm – Session Two

‘More Poetry by the Earl of Essex?’ Hugh Gazzard (St. Hugh’s College, Oxford)

‘From Imitation to Counterfeit: Essex’s hand in correspondence’. Andrew Gordon (University of Aberdeen).

3.15-3.30pm – Coffee

3.30-4.30pm

 ‘”Still renewing wronges”: Gheeraert’s Persian Lady Revealed’. Chris Laoutaris (Shakespeare Institute, University of Birmingham) and Yasmin Arshad (University College London

4.30pm Closing Remarks and conclusion of Symposium

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10.

 

12th ESSE CONFERENCE
in KOŠICE, SLOVAKIA
UPJS FF UPJS
Friday 29 August – Tuesday 2 September, 2014

Seminar on English manuscript studies

The focus is on editing manuscripts from all periods, whether they be strictly literary or not. The seminar is particularly interested in unpublished material in manuscript. Research topics include, and are not restricted to, finding manuscripts and archival work, manuscript collections, scribal work, paleography, manuscripts as books, the coexistence of manuscripts and printed books, what manuscripts tell us on reading habits, editing manuscripts, electronic versus printed editions, manuscript studies and digital humanities. Manuscript studies have been on the cutting edge of literary theory and papers on authorship, the constitution of the text or hermeneutics are welcome.

Please send your proposals to: Carlo Bajetta (Università della Valle d’Aosta, Italy)

carlo.bajetta@univda.it and Guillaume Coatalen (Université de Cergy-Pontoise, France)

guillaumecoatalen@hotmail.com

 

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 11.

The Women’s Studies Group 1558-1837 is an informal and friendly society that meets regularly at the University of London, UK.

We’re delighted to announce that our seminar series for the 2013-14 academic year begins on September 28; all those visiting or based in the UK are welcome to attend.

VENUE: Room 234 in the Senate House, Malet Street, University of London. 2pm-5pm 

Alison Winch: ’Drinking a dish of tea with Sapho’: The Sexual Fantasies of Lady Mary Wortley Montagu and Lord Byron.

Eleonora Capra: Jane Austen in Italy Now and Then (2007).

Kathryn Lowerre: Catholicism, Music, and Money in the Life of an English Opera Singer: Anastasia Robinson.

Corrina Connor: Did Bluestockings play the violin? Music, morals and masculinity in the intellectual societies of eighteenth-century London.

Please share this e-mail with friends and colleagues.

Our full 2013/14 programme is available on our website (link below), with subsequent sessions taking place on 30 November and 25 January.

Any questions, don’t hesitate to contact me.

We hope you can join us.

Kind regards

Louise Duckling (e: louise@philipmarksav.co.uk)

On behalf of the Women’s Studies Group 1558-1837

www.womenstudiesgroup.org.uk

 

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 12.

For information on the upcoming conference “Early Modern Rome 2″ in celebration of the 10th anniversary of the UCEAP “Rome Through the Ages” program, organized by the University of California, Rome Study Center with ACCENT, and in collaboration with the Istituto storico italiano per il Medioevo, the Biblioteca Vallicelliana, the Archivio Storico Capitolino, and the Castello Orsini-Odescalchi di Bracciano, see:
The conference (free and open to the public) will be held from October 10-12, 2013, but all attendees need to register on the conference website.

 

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 13.

The London Renaissance Seminar will meet on Saturday 19th October to discuss:

Creating Early Modern Memory

Speakers include Johanna Harris, University of Exeter; Kate Hodgkin, University of East London; Alexandra Walsham, University of Cambridge; Gillian Woods, Birkbeck, University of London

Saturday 19th October 2013

1-5pm, 43 Gordon Square, School of Arts, Birkbeck

All welcome, no registration necessary.

Any queries to elizabeth.scott-bauman@kcl.ac.uk

 

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 14.

Emma Dillon – Remembering to Forget: Music, Conversion, and the Early Cistercian Experience

Tuesday 1st October 2013
5pm, ArtsTwo Room 3.16
Queen Mary, University of London
Mile End Road E1 4NS

Please join Queen Mary’s Centre for Renaissance and Early Modern Studies and QM Music and Sound for the first event of the academic year. Followed by wine and discussion. Attendance is free; all welcome.

Remembering to Forget: Music, Conversion, and the Early Cistercian Experience

The Cistercian order emerged at the end of the eleventh century, purportedly as a reaction against the decadent excesses associated with the Cluniac tradition. According to the foundational theological and administrative writings of the order, to be Cistercian was to convert; and to convert was to actively forget the trappings of a former religious or secular life. The narrative of conversion and reform appears to correspond to other evidence that early Cistercian houses promoted a reactionary austerity, eschewing decadent material trappings of devotion in favor of a simpler and less distracting devotional environment. That impulse was seemingly true of music: Cistercian liturgy is well-known in the history of medieval chant for its reforms, manifest, for example, in an expunging of melodic ornament and a ban on polyphony.

This paper takes a closer look at the evidence of contemporary writers, music theory and extant liturgical manuscripts and suggests that reforming chant was less an act of erasure or displacement of past traditions. Instead, it argues that there was potentially a virtue in remembering what one was supposed to forget.

Professor Emma Dillon (King’s College London) studied music at Oxford, where completed a DPhil in 1998. She was a Lecturer at the University of Bristol, and Assistant Professor and Professor at the University of Pennsylvania, where she also served as Chair of the Department. She has been a Visiting Professor at the University of California at Berkeley, a Member and Visitor at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton, and a Visiting Scholar at Corpus Christi College, Oxford. She joined the Music Department at King’s in 2013.

Her research focuses on European musical culture from the twelfth to fourteenth centuries. Her work ranges widely in terms of repertories, sources, and methodology, and falls at the intersection of musicology, sound studies, medieval studies, and the history of material texts. She is the author of Medieval Music-Making and the Roman de Fauvel (Cambridge University Press, 2002) and The Sense of Sound: Musical Meaning in France, 1260-1330 (Oxford University Press in 2012).

 

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 15.

Horace in Renaissance France: Poetry and Scholarship
The Warburg Institute, November 29th 2013
(organizers: Daniel Andersson, Ariane Schwartz)
This colloquium will examine both the scholarly and the literary Horace in Renaissance France. Although the works of Horace may have been a relatively late arrival on the educational scene in France (compared to Vergil or Seneca), his influence was crucial in the formation of both the identity of ‘the Poet’ and ideas of philosophical liberty. The publication of the great commentary by the Denys Lambin acted as a sort of fillip to the securer presence of Horace in France, and encouraged a raft of translations. Furthermore his commentary, especially the second edition, marked a sort of coronation of Lambin as a pre-eminent Parisian philologus. Horace turns out to be a crucial part of the story of how France’s identity was fashioned as a second Rome, with a second Augustus and a second Maecenas. Yet much remains to be done. The  nuts and bolts of marginalia and commentaries have still not been subjected to the kind of scrutiny that they reward; the regional stories and the impact of the Italian vernacular literature has yet to be assessed; and finally, it is hoped that all participants will come away from the conference with a clearer idea of the disciplinary boundaries that cluster around and between ‘reception’ and ‘reading’. Post-graduate students are, in particular, warmly invited to attend. Presentations will be in both French and English.

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 16.

UCL IMARS Seminars

Full schedule for this year’s seminar, please follow the link:

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/mars/seminars-lectures/imars_13_14

Best Regards,

Alison Ray

Email: alison.ray09@ucl.ac.uk

Co-convenor and PhD Student in Medieval History, UCL

 

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 17.

Coming soon to The Courtauld Gallery

The Young Dürer: Drawing the Figure

17 October 2013 – 12 January 2014

 

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 18.

The Early Modern Research Centre, University of Reading

Reading Conference in Early Modern Studies, 7-9 July 2014: call for papers

The Reading Early Modern Conference continues to establish itself as the place where early modernists meet each July for stimulation, conversation and debate. As in previous years, proposals of individual papers and panels are invited on research in any aspect of early modern studies relating to Britain, Europe and the wider world. This year, the plenary speakers are Randall McLeod (Toronto) and Tony Claydon (Bangor).

We would welcome proposals for individual papers and panels on any aspect of early modern literature, history, art, music and culture. Panels have been proposed on the following themes and further panels or individual papers are also invited on these topics or any other aspect of early modern studies:

  • 1714: the death of Queen Anne, the last of the Stuarts; succession in a British and European context.
  • Material texts: technologies of paper, pen and print; binding and unbinding books; compilation, collection, anthologising; modern technologies and early modern texts.
  • Writers’ career choices: poetry versus plays; theatre history; plague closures; history of printing; debates over authorship.
  • Knowledge, method, practice; mechanic arts; guilds and mysteries; tacit knowledge; statecraft andarcana imperii; how-to manuals; thinking about thinking.

Proposals for panels should consist of a minimum of two and a maximum of four papers.

Each panel proposal should contain the names of the session chair, the names and affiliations of the speakers and short abstracts (200 word abstracts) of the papers together with email contacts for all participants. A proposal for an individual paper should consist of a 200 word abstract of the paper with brief details of affiliation and career.

Proposals for either papers or panels should be sent by email to the chair of the Conference Committee, Dr. Rebecca Bullard, by 6 January 2014, r.bullard@reading.ac.uk

We welcome proposals from postgraduates, and the conference hopes to make some money available for postgraduate bursaries. Anyone for whom some financial assistance is a prerequisite for their attendance should mention this when submitting their proposal.

 

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19.

Text and Book in the Age of Swift

We would be very grateful if you would share the information about this conference with members of your department.

Text and Book in the Age of Swift

A day conference on 23 November 2013

St Peter’s College Oxford

Speakers include

Paddy Bullard (University of Kent)

Pat Rogers (University of South Florida)

Valerie Rumbold (University of Birmingham)

Abigail Williams (University of Oxford)

In a period when the English and Irish book trades were increasing their political and commercial importance, no one had a sharper eye for print’s expressive and satirical potential than Swift. Papers at this conference will review his relationship to books, query his literary and book-trade contexts, detail new research on eighteenth-century editions of Shakespeare and Spenser, and reflect on the editing of volumes in the Cambridge Swift.

Registration

There will be conference fee of £20 which will cover lunch, coffee, and tea. Participants will be invited to a reception at St Peter’s to celebrate the publication of the Cambridge edition of Swift’s Journal to Stella, edited by Abigail Williams, and a collection supplementary to the edition, Swift and the Eighteenth-Century Book, edited by Paddy Bullard and James McLaverty.

The registration form can be downloaded at

http://www.spc.ox.ac.uk/event/22/331/text_and_book_in_the_age_of_swift.html

Please return the form by email to alison.wiblin@spc.ox.ac.uk or by post to Alison Wiblin, St Peter’s College, Oxford, OX1 2DL. Payment should be in the form a cheque made out to Abigail Williams, or money can be paid in directly to the appropriate bank account.

Academic enquiries should be addressed to the Conference Coordinators, Abigail Williams and James McLaverty, atswift@spc.ox.ac.uk

Jonathan Swift and the Eighteenth-Century Book

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 20.

Please find below the Call for Papers for the Second Annual Postgraduate Renaissance Symposium:

-       The Visual Arts and Music in Renaissance Europe c.1400 – 1650, which will take place at The Courtauld on Saturday 18 January 2014

Please send proposals of no more than 250 words and your academic CV by 4 November 2013 torenaissanceartandmusic@gmail.com

For further information:http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/researchforum/events/2013/autumn/jan18_RenaissanceArtsMusicSymposium.shtml

With best wishes

Research Forum

The Courtauld Institute of Art

Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN

www.courtauld.ac.uk

 

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 21.

We are writing to let you know about the exciting and varied range of events taking place at the Warburg Institute during 2013/14.

The complete Annual Programme is available at: http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/fileadmin/images/events/AnnualProgramme2013_14.pdf

Listed below are just a few of the events taking  place during the Autumn term:

Public Lectures

  • 9 October – Love and Pastoral: Constructing a History of Arcadia – Dr Paul Holberton
  • 10, 17 and 24 October – E H Gombrich Lecture Series on the Classical Tradition – Ancient Strength by Professor Jonathan Bate, Provost, Worcester College, University of Oxford

Colloquia

  • 25 October – Sculpture in Rome: Rethinking Classicism and Questioning Materiality
  • 7 – 8 November – Platonism after Plato in the Renaissance
  • 16 December – The Afterlife of the Kulturwissenschaftliche Bibliothek. Hamburg and London Traditions in the Development of the Warburg Institute. A Commemoration of the Migration in December 1933

Further details about all our events are available on our website at: http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/nc/events/

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 22.

Two Calleva Centre three-year Postdoctoral Research Associates
 
Magdalen College (University of Oxford) proposes to appoint two postdoctoral research associates in connection with a collaborative project entitled Adults at Play(s). Both posts are for three years from 1 October 2014. Candidates must have a doctorate in hand by that date. They will already have demonstrated outstanding promise either in the study of dramatic literature or in experimental psychology, and will have an aptitude and enthusiasm for interdisciplinary work across these areas. The postholders will collaborate with three fellows of the college (Felix Budelmann, Robin Dunbar and Laurie Maguire) in developing experimental and text-based research on the psychology of the audience, with particular reference to classical Greek and early modern English drama. Informal enquiries should be directed to felix.budelmann@magd.ox.ac.uk,robin.dunbar@magd.ox.ac.uk or laurie.maguire@magd.ox.ac.uk.
Both appointments will be made at points 29-31 on the University Salary Scale 7, currently £29,541-£31,331 p.a.; plus benefits.
Application forms and further particulars, which include information on how to apply, are available at www.magd.ox.ac.uk/vacancies/ . The deadline for applications is UK time 12 noon on 1 November 2013.
Magdalen College is an Equal Opportunities Employer.

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 23.

British Branch of the International Courtly Literature Society (ICLS)

University of Exeter, Monday 14th and Tuesday 15th April, 2014

Call for Papers:

The next meeting of the British Branch of the International Courtly Literature Society will take place on 14th/15th April 2014 at the University of Exeter, hosted by Dr Emma Cayley and Dr Thomas Hinton (Dept of Modern Languages: French)http://humanities.exeter.ac.uk/modernlanguages/

For those who are able to stay on Tuesday afternoon, a tour of Exeter Cathedral and the historic medieval centre of Exeter is planned. We will see the famous tenth-century Exeter Book (Codex Exoniensis) and other treasures of the Cathedral Library. http://www.exeter-cathedral.org.uk/

Proposals for papers of 25 minutes in length in any area of the Society’s interests are invited from the membership. Please send these to Dr Emma Cayley by email (e.j.cayley@exeter.ac.uk) or hard copy by 15th December 2013 to:

Dr Emma Cayley

Head of Modern Languages

College of Humanities

University of Exeter

Queen’s Building

Exeter EX4 4QH

Please include any particular AV requests with your proposal. All conference rooms are equipped with extensive AV facilities including fixed PC, powerpoint projection and screens.

 The conference will run from approx 11am on Monday 14th April to 2pm on Tuesday 15th April. All sessions will take place in the Margaret Rooms, located in the well-equipped Queen’s Building on the lovely Streatham Campus.

http://www.exeter.ac.uk/visit/directions/googlestreathammap/

B&B accommodation will be available for all delegates at the very comfortable Holland Hall, just a five to ten-minute walk from Queen’s Building on both Sunday and Monday nights if required. All rooms are en-suite with double beds, and many have unparalleled views over the Exwick Hills. Parking is available for residents.http://www.exeter.ac.uk/eventexeter/ourvenues/hollandhall/

Rates (approx):

Non-residential: Standard, £120; PG/unwaged, £95.

Residential (incl. Monday night B&B and Dinner at Holland Hall: Standard £200; PG/unwaged, £175.

Extra night B&B on Sunday available at £45 for single occupancy.  Double occupancy available for all B&B bookings.

Monday dinner at Holland Hall for non-residents: £35

Day delegate: Standard £65; PG/unwaged, £50.

All rates include tea/coffee/biscuits and buffet lunches.

 Registration forms will be available in due course from the conference website:http://humanities.exeter.ac.uk/modernlanguages/research/conferences/britishbranchoftheinternationalcourtlyliteraturesocietyicls/

 

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 24.

Following a successful first year, the History of Pre-Modern Medicine seminar series returns this autumn.  The 2013-14 series – organised by a group of historians of medicine based at London universities and hosted by the Wellcome Library – will commence with four seminars.

The series will be focused on pre-modern medicine, which we take to cover European and non-European history before the 20th century (antiquity, medieval and early modern history, some elements of 19th-century medicine). The seminars are open to all.

PROGRAMME FOR AUTUMN 2013

Tues 15th Oct, Anita Guerrini (Oregon State), ‘The Galenist as Mechanist: Claude Perrault and the Natural History of Animals’.

Tues 29th Oct, François-Olivier Touati (Tours), ‘Between the East and the West : transmission of diseases, connection of medical responses during the Middle Ages’.

Tues 5th Nov, Hannah Newton (Cambridge), ‘“O how sweet is ease!”: Recovering from Illness in Early Modern England, 1580-1720’.

Tues 19th Nov, Emilie Savage-Smith (Oxford) ‘“The Best Accounts of the Classes of Physicians”: A history of medicine throughout the known world, composed in Syria in the 13th century’.

All seminars will take place in the Wellcome Trust, Gibbs Building, 215 Euston Road, NW1 2BE.  Doors at 6pm prompt, seminars will start at 6.15.

The programme for January-March 2014 will follow in the new year.

Organising Committee: Elma Brenner (Wellcome Library), Sandra Cavallo (RHUL), John Henderson (BirkbeckUL) Colin Jones (QMUL), William MacLehose (UCL), Anna Maerker (KCL), Christelle Rabier (LSE), Patrick Wallis (LSE, convenor), Ronit Yoeli-Tlalim (Goldsmiths).

Enquiries to Ross MacFarlane (Wellcome Library: R.MacFarlane@wellcome.ac.uk) or Dr Patrick Wallis (LSE:p.h.wallis@lse.ac.uk).

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25.

The Gothic Ivories team is delighted to announce that 700 ‘new’ ivory carvings from over 60 different collections are now available online as part of the Gothic Ivories website! (www.gothicivories.courtauld.ac.uk)

Highlights include the Musei Vaticani in Rome, the Schnütgen Museum in CologneThe Burrell Collection in Glasgow, the Bonnefanten Museum in Maastricht, important collections in Madrid such as the Fundación Lázaro Galdiano and theInstituto Valencia de Don Juan, Scandinavian collections, from Copenhagen to Oslo, and from Stockholm to Lund, theMuseo di Capodimonte and Museo di Duca di Martina in Naples, the Czartoryski Museum in Cracow, the Museum of Applied Arts in Budapest, the Musée de l’Hôtel Sandelin in Saint-Omer, as well as many smaller and unexpected collections in Brie-Comte-RobertCapri, etc.!

The Gothic Ivories Project is also getting interested in so-called ‘fictile ivories’, i.e. casts of ivory sculptures made in the 19th century. As the Conway Library at the Courtauld Institute of Art has a small collection of such casts, we were able to add photographs of these to our corpus. For more details, see here:http://www.gothicivories.courtauld.ac.uk/stories/yvard_news.html

We wish to thank all collaborating institutions for their amazing support and all their work.

Happy browsing and, as always, spread the word!

Best wishes,

Catherine

Dr Catherine Yvard

Project Manager - Gothic Ivories Project

Witt Library

Courtauld Institute

Somerset House, Strand

London WC2R 0RN

Direct line: 00 44 (0) 20 7848 7657

The Gothic Ivories Website is now live! www.gothicivories.courtauld.ac.uk

 

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 26.

INSTITUTE OF HISTORICAL RESEARCH
Society, Culture and Belief, 1500-1800

Convenors: Laura Gowing (King’s College London), Kate Hodgkin (University of East London) Michael Hunter (Birkbeck) and Brodie Waddell (Birkbeck).

The academic year 2013-14 marks the 35th anniversary of the founding of this seminar in 1979, and this will be celebrated by a miscellany of papers by old and new friends of the seminar

 

Seminars will take place in the Bedford Room, G37, Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1, on the following Thursdays at 5.30 p.m. All are welcome!

10 October

Peter Burke (Emmanuel College, Cambridge)

 Generation: is this a useful category of analysis for early modern historians?

7 November

Michael Hunter (Birkbeck)

Boyle’s legacy: second sight in English and Scottish thought in the long 18th century

Friday 22 November  Joint session with Women’s History Seminar, in Senate House G21A

Sarah Fox (Manchester)

 ’I do most sincerely wish you Dear Madam a Happy Minute’: the experience of childbirth in the long 18th century

5 December

Matt Phillpott (IHR),

 Tracing the reputation of Polydore Vergil: scholarly debates and cultural change during    the English Reformation

23 January

Lyndal Roper (Oriel College, Oxford)

 [Title to be confirmed]

20 February

Mark Knights (University of Warwick)

 Corruption in early modern Britain

20 March

Katherine Hunt (University of East Anglia)

 Shuffle and play, read and learn: early modern English didactic playing cards.

 

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 27.

Call for book proposals: Literary & Scientific Cultures of Early Modernity

For more than a decade now, Literary and Scientific Cultures of Early Modernity,http://www.ashgate.com/LITSCI, has provided a forum for groundbreaking work on the relations between literary and scientific discourses in Europe, during a period when both fields were in a crucial moment of historical formation. We welcome proposals that address the many overlaps between modes of imaginative writing typical of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries—poetics, rhetoric, prose narrative, dramatic production, utopia—and the vocabularies, conceptual models, and intellectual methods of newly emergent ‘scientific’ fields such as medicine, astronomy, astrology, alchemy, psychology, mapping, mathematics, or natural history. In order to reflect the nature of intellectual inquiry during the period, the series is interdisciplinary in orientation and publishes monographs, edited collections, and selected critical editions of primary texts relevant to an understanding of the mutual implication of literary and scientific epistemologies.

As the series continues to evolve, we particularly seek submissions to do with:

·         alchemy

·         science in the New World

·         meteorology

·         knowledge networks

·         global science

·         machines

·         poetics and science

·         navigation/mapmaking

To submit a proposal, or for more information, please contact: Erika Gaffney, Publishing Manager,egaffney@ashgate.com

 

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 28.

Centre for Editing Lives and Letters Director’s Seminar schedule: http://www.livesandletters.ac.uk/?q=content/directors-seminar

 

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 29.

CENTENARY CONFERENCE:

                                 HUGH TREVOR-ROPER 1914-2014

A series of papers and discussions to mark the centenary of his birth (on 15 January) and to appraise aspects of his thought and writing.

The programme is given below. Those who have seen this document in an earlier form should please note the change of venue and the

closing date for full pre-registration. Any further announcements about the conference will be made on

www.hughtrevorroper.co.uk.

If you have difficulty in accessing this site, please email Blair Worden as below.

The conference, which is arranged by the Dacre Trust in association with the Oxford History Faculty, will be held on 

                                               SATURDAY 11 JANUARY 2014                                                 

                                                                     in the

                                   OXFORD UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION SCHOOLS

                                           (OX1 4AS: FOR TRAVEL FROM LONDON SEE BELOW)

                                                              Programme

9.30 – 10.00 Arrival and Registration

 10.00 – 11.30 SESSION 1: MID-SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY REVOLUTIONS

Sir John Elliott, ‘Trevor-Roper and “The General Crisis of the Seventeenth Century”’

Blair Worden, ‘The Unpublished Book: The Puritan Revolution’

Mark Greengrass, ‘“Three Foreigners: The Philosophers of the Puritan Revolution”’

                                                               COFFEE

11.55 – 1.00 SESSION 2: ERASMIANISM AND ECUMENICALISM

Peter N. Miller, ‘Trevor-Roper and the Erasmian Tradition’

Noel Malcolm, ‘Another Unpublished Book: “The Ecumenical Movement and the Church of England, 1598-1618”’

                                                         BUFFET LUNCH 

2.00 – 3.55 SESSION 3: THE SECOND WORLD WAR

Richard Overy, ‘The Last Days of Hitler’

Sir Michael Howard, ‘Trevor-Roper and Wartime Intelligence’

Eberhard Jäckel, ‘Trevor-Roper and Hitler’

Gina Thomas, ‘Trevor-Roper and Himmler’s Masseur’

                                                              T EA

4.15 – 4.50 SESSION 4: THE PROSE

John Banville, ‘Trevor-Roper as Prose Stylist’

4.50 – 5.30 SESSION 5: CONCLUDING DISCUSSION

Brief remarks by a sequence of speakers will precede comments from the floor. Provisional list of speakers:

Peter Ghosh

Colin Kidd

Noel Malcolm

Scott Mandelbrote

John Robertson

Paul Rose

Blair Worden

5.30 – 7.15 RECEPTION -

to celebrate the centenary, and to mark the publication of ONE HUNDRED LETTERS FROM HUGH TREVOR-ROPER, a selection of letters to a variety of correspondents written between 1943 and 2001. The book is edited by Richard Davenport-Hines and Adam Sisman and will be published by Oxford University Press. Those who have attended part or all of the conference will be welcome at the reception.

ARRANGEMENTS FOR ATTENDANCE AND PRE-REGISTRATION

THE PAPERS AND DISCUSSIONS ARE OPEN TO ALL, AND THOSE WHO COME TO THEM ARE WELCOME TO DO SO FOR EITHER ALL OR PART OF THE PROCEEDINGS. THERE IS NO CHARGE FOR ATTENDANCE OR FOR LUNCH OR REFRESHMENTS, BUT THOSE WISHING TO ATTEND WILL NEED TO PRE-REGISTER. SPACE IS LIMITED AND PLACES WILL BE ALLOCATED FIRST-COME-FIRST SERVED.

IN ANY CASE IT MAY NOT BE POSSIBLE TO OFFER LUNCH OR REFRESHMENTS, OR ATTENDANCE AT THE RECEPTION, TO ANYONE PRE-REGISTERING LATER THAN

                                                      MONDAY 9 DECEMBER 

TO PRE-REGISTER PLEASE EMAIL BLAIR WORDEN (WHO WILL BE HAPPY TO ANSWER QUERIES) AT

blair.worden@history.ox.ac.uk

THOSE PRE-REGISTERING SHOULD PLEASE  SAY WHETHER I) THEY WILL TAKE LUNCH; (2) THEY WILL ATTEND THE RECEPTION; (3) THEY EXPECT TO ATTEND ALL THE SESSIONS OR, IF NOT, FOR WHICH OF THEM THEY PLAN TO BE PRESENT. THEY SHOULD PLEASE MENTION ANY DIETARY REQUIREMENTS FOR LUNCHTIME.

TRAVEL FROM LONDON

The Examination Schools, which are in the High Street, are by the Queen’s Lane bus stop, where London buses stop.

DACRE CENTENARY LECTURES

In the autumn of 2014 a series of Dacre Centenary Lectures will be held, in
association with the Oxford History Faculty, in the Examination Schools,
Oxford, on Fridays at 5 p.m., provisionally under the title ‘IDEAS AND SOCIETY
c. 1600-1800’. The speakers will be
 ANTHONY GRAFTON, MICHAEL HUNTER, JONATHAN ISRAEL, COLIN KIDD, NOEL MALCOLM, DAVID WOMERSLEY AND BRIAN YOUNG.

 

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 30.

For more information: http://colleges2014.wordpress.com/

Collegial Communities in Exile Conference: New histories of the Irish, English, Scots, Dutch and other colleges founded on the continent in the early modern period

Mary Immaculate College, University of Limerick, Ireland ― 19-20 June 2014

Early modern Europe witnessed the large-scale migration of peoples for religious, political, economic, social and other reasons. This important feature of European history has received sustained attention from scholars in recent decades as research has increasingly pointed to the transnational nature of early modern societies. One of the striking features of early modern Catholic migration, especially from Ireland, England and Scotland, was the establishment of national ‘colleges’ on the continent to facilitate the formation and education of clerical and lay students. William Allen’s foundation of an English College at Douai in 1568 was quickly followed by others, as well as by Scots Colleges (the Scots College in Paris was unusual: it pre-dated Allen’s Douai establishment) and more than forty Irish Colleges stretching from Leuven to Rome and Lisbon to Prague. This phenomenon was not confined to English, Scots and Irish Catholics: Leuven and other cities witnessed the foundation of Dutch Colleges, while Rome saw a dramatic increase in the number of colleges hosting foreign students. The importance of the colleges has long been recognised by historians, but their histories have too often been located within isolated national or confessional historiographical traditions. Far from exile outposts, the colleges were dynamic focal points of migrant communities. This conference seeks to re-conceptualise the colleges in a comparative framework by exploring the histories of Irish, English, Scots, Dutch, Roman and other colleges together and by drawing parallels with educational institutions established by other religious minorities and refugees.

The conference welcomes proposals for papers on any aspect of the Irish, English, Scots, Dutch, Roman or other colleges in the early modern period or in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We also welcome proposals for papers on individuals or groups associated with the colleges.

Papers dealing with neglected issues are especially welcome, including: buildings, spaces and architecture; material culture; music; social and financial histories; relationships with migrant communities and networks; relationships with host societies (including state and municipal authorities; universities; churches; religious houses); political and intellectual engagements; self-fashioning and the colleges; the ‘afterlives’ of the colleges in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; the historiography of the colleges; parallel institutions established by other religious minorities and refugees in early modern Europe.

Proposals for 25-minute papers should be submitted by e-mail to Liam Chambers (Liam.Chambers@mic.ul.ie) before 17 January 2014. Proposals should include: name, institutional affiliation (if appropriate), paper title, and a 250-word abstract. We also welcome proposals for three-speaker panels. Postgraduate students are particularly encouraged to offer papers. Prospective speakers will be notified of a decision in February 2014 at the latest.

Plenary Speakers: Professor Willem Frijhoff (VU University, Amsterdam) on Dutch Colleges;Professor Michael Questier (Queen Mary, University of London) on English Colleges; Dr Thomas O’Connor (National University of Ireland, Maynooth) on Irish Colleges; ProfessorMícheál Mac Craith (St Isidore’s College, Rome) on the colleges of the Irish regular clergy; a speaker to be confirmed on Scots Colleges

 

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 31.

You may be interested in a one day colloquium being hosted at Queen Mary, University of London on Saturday 7 December, 2013. The event is ‘Reading, Writing and Religion, 1660-1830′. See the attached CFP and colloquium website for further details: http://writingandreligion.wordpress.com/
All best,

Victoria Van Hyning
PhD Candidate, University of Sheffield
Department of English Literature
‘Letters and Lives’ British Library studentship holder
MSt Oxford
www.pickeringchatto.com/convents

 

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 32.

‘Lewis as Critic’
23rd November, 2013
Cripps Court, Magdalene College, Cambridge
In this one-day conference we will discuss the significance of C.S.
Lewis’ contribution to the practice of criticism and commemorate the
50th anniversary of his death.
We have Rt. Rev Dr. Rowan Williams on Lewis’ Milton; Prof. Helen Cooper
on Lewis as Medievalist; Prof. Ad Putter on Lewis and Allegory; Rev. Dr.
Malcolm Guite on Lewis’ Abolition of Man; Prof. Stephen Prickett on
Criticism, Theology and Fiction and Dr. Stephen Logan on Lewis’ Soul.
Some of the issues we plan to discuss are how do we think of Lewis’
critical writing now; is he still on our reading lists; what do students
make of his views on literature?
Registration closes on 25th October, 2013
For more information, and to register, please visit:
lewisascritic.wordpress.com
For updates of conference news, ‘follow’ us on twitter @lewisascritic
To contact us, email lewisascritic@gmail.com

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 33.

Please find attached and at this link details of the fifth Early Modern Symposium at the Courtauld Institute of Art on Saturday 26 October.

http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/researchforum/events/2013/autumn/oct26_FifthEarlyModernSymposium.shtml

 

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 34.

Classical Philosophers in Seventeenth Century English Thought

28 May 2014, CREMS, University of York

A day symposium – Keynote speakers: Prof Jessica Wolfe (North Carolina) and Prof Sarah Hutton (Aberystwyth)

This one day symposium will look at the reception of classical philosophers in seventeenth century English thought and culture, in philosophy, religion, natural philosophy, poetry and literature, the university, or other areas of early modern intellectual life. The focus will be on England, but not on English, and we encourage papers on the Latin reception of classical philosophy.

We will take the term ‘classical philosophy’ broadly speaking, and with a generic latitude, so that Homer or Hesiod might be considered, as they certainly were in the early modern period, as contributors to the philosophical outlook of the ancients, and so that while Aristotle, Plato, Epicurus, Seneca or Cicero are central and protean in their seventeenth century reception, so too Virgil, Ovid and Lucretius were seen as containing an important philosophical core.  Of interest also might be the collations and compendia of classical thought that served as a digest of ancient ideas, whether those of the ancients themselves, such as Diogenes Laertius, or of the early modern writers, such as Thomas Stanley’s History of Philosophy. How did early modern writers accommodate, transpose or circumvent the pagan elements in ancient philosophy? How concerned were early modern thinkers with the systematic and with completeness in their use of classical philosophers? How was the pagan religion transposed to a Christian era?

Abstracts by 15th December (c. 250 words)

Contact: Kevin Killeen, kevin.killeen@york.ac.uk

This symposium is part of a diffuse and ongoing Thomas Browne Seminar that has digressed quite far: http://www.york.ac.uk/english/news-events/browne/

 

 

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The Keith Walker Memorial Lecture 2013 will take place at 6.30pm on Thursday 14th November, in the Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre, UCL, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT. There are maps and directions at http://www.ucl.ac.uk/maps. Please reserve your place by going to keithwalker.eventbrite.co.uk. All welcome.
 

Professor Sir Brian Vickers (Honorary Research Professor of UCL English) will speak on “The One King Lear“.

The Keith Walker Memorial Lecture is a biennial event to commemorate a much loved member of staff of UCL English Department who was a renowned editor of Rochester, Dryden, and Marvell. This year we look forward to an exciting and thought-provoking lecture by the distinguished scholar Sir Brian Vickers. Since the 1980s it has been generally accepted that Shakespeare revised King Lear in around 1610, and that the Quarto and Folio editions represent two substantially different plays, often printed separately in modern editions. Professor Vickers will present evidence to refute this view.

 

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 Please find below details of the 2013 autumn term programme for the Research Seminars. (All seminars are free /open to all and taking place at The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, WC2R 0RN London )EARLY MODERN

·          Monday, 14 October – Nick Grindle (University College London): Marginal Figures: A New Approach to George Morland. 6.00pm, Research Forum South Room

·          Monday, 28 October – Speaker TBC. 6.00pm, Research Forum South Room

  • Monday, 25 November – Meredith Gamer (Yale University): Hanged, Quartered, and Drawn: Visual cultures of the Criminal Body from Tyburn to the Academy. 6.00pm, Research Forum South Room

RENAISSANCE

·          Wednesday, 16 October – Cristina Terzaghi (Università degli Studi Roma Tre): Caravaggio and Copies: Art Market and the Birth of a Style. 5.30pm, Research Forum South Room

·          Wednesday, 6 November – Laura Teza (Università degli Studi di Perugia): Caravaggio’s The Boy Peeling Fruit and the Academy of the Insensati. 5.30pm, Research Forum South Room 

·          Thursday, 5 December – Denise Allen (Frick Collection, New York): Considering Antico after an Exhibition.6.00pm (note time), Research Forum South Room

All seminars are free and open to all

Further information : http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/researchforum/calendar.shtml

Research Forum

The Courtauld Institute of Art

Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN

 

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NEW Cultures of Knowledge Lunchtime Seminar Series: Negotiating Networks

Theme: early modern letters, networks and the digital humanities.

Thursdays 1pm, 31st Oct – 5th Dec: Conference Room, Oxford e-Research Centre, Keble Road

Lunch provided (first come, first served)

http://www.culturesofknowledge.org/?page_id=1270

All welcome!

NB: Nov 21st seminar will be held in Room 8, St Anne’s College, Woodstock Road

 

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‘Renaissance Loves’

London Renaissance Seminar

9 November, 2.00pm-6.00pm

Room 124

Birkbeck College,

43 Gordon Square,

London WC1.

Ms Linda Grant   (Birkbeck)‘“Loved as no woman shall ever be loved again”: Catullus and the shaping of sixteenth-century English love poetry.’

Professor Stephen Guy-Bray (Toronto) , ‘”Militat omnis amans”: Love as War in Renaissance Sonnets.’

Professor Ian Moulton (Arizona), ‘Love in Print: Romance and the Book Market.’

Professor Will Fisher (NYU) “Seignor Dildo’s Adventures in Britain”:Sexual Instruments and Women’s Erotic Agency in England, c.1600-1725.’

Organisers: Linda Grant, Judith Hudson, Sue Wiseman

Contact: s.wiseman@bbk.ac.uk

 

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“REVISITING EARLY MODERN PROPHECIES (c.1500-c.1815)”
26–28 June, 2014 
Goldsmiths, London
The Reformation dramatically changed Europe’s religious and political landscapes within a few decades. The Protestant emphasis on translating the Scriptures into the vernacular and the developments of the printing press rapidly gave increased visibility to the most obscure parts of the Bible. Similarly, Spanish and Italian mystics promoted a spiritual regeneration of the Catholic Church during the Counter-Reformation. Prophecies, whether of biblical, ancient or popular origin, as well as their interpretations gradually began reaching a wider audience, sparking controversies throughout all levels of society across Europe. In recent years, new research has eroded the long standing historiographical consensus of an increasing secularisation accelerated by the Enlightenment, which allegedly cast away beliefs in prophecies and miracles as outmoded. The multiplication of case studies on millenarian movements suggests a radically different picture, yet many questions remain. How did prophecies evolve with the politico-religious conjunctions of their time? Who read them? How seriously were they taken?This three-day, international conference will aim to answer these questions by bringing together scholars from around the world to reassess the importance of prophecies from the Reformation to the French Revolution and beyond. We therefore invite papers and panel proposals on prophecy in Europe and the Mediterranean world between approximately 1500 and 1800. Possible topics may include, but are not limited to: apocalyptic predictions, the Antichrist, millenarianism, irenicism, wonders and miracles, astrology and divination, ecumenical movements, religious utopias, mystical networks, enthusiasts and female mystics.‌Keynote speakers:Prof. Irena Backus (Geneva)
Prof. Nigel Smith (Princeton)
Prof. Christopher Rowland (Oxford)

Other confirmed speakers:Federico Barbierato
Jürgen Beyer
Vittoria Feola
David Finnegan
Mercedes García-Arenal
Crawford Gribben
Jacques Halbronn
Warren Johnston
Nick McDowell
Jo SpaansProposals for 20-minute papers in English (maximum 300 words) with a short bio are invited, and should be sent by 31 October 2013 to either of the conference organisers:Dr Ariel Hessayon  a.hessayon(@gold.ac.uk)
Dr Lionel Laborie  l.laborie(@gold.ac.uk)

 

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Society for Neo-Latin Studies:

Annual Lecture

November 8th 5 p.m.

 King’s College London, Classics Department, Room B6

emeritus professor roger p.h. green

(University of Glasgow)

The Poetry of George Buchanan  1973-2023

Professor Green’s lecture will review the remarkable surge in scholarly study of the poetry of George Buchanan (1506-82) over recent years, and also look forward to the next decade. He will concentrate in particular on Ian McFarlane’s biography of Buchanan (1981) and the work, sadly now truncated, of the late Philip Ford  (especially his George Buchanan, Prince of Poets, 1982), without forgetting Buchanan’s tragedies (Walsh and Sharratt, 1983) or John Durkan’s Bibliography of George Buchanan (1994).  Such fundamental works continue to stimulate and inform Buchanan research, as does more recent work, much of it benefiting from Philip Ford’s help and leadership. By 2023, perhaps, the surge will seem unique for a Neo-Latin poet.

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*British Milton Seminar, 19 October 2013: Programme* Saturday 19 October 2013

Venue: In the Birmingham and Midland Institute

[**PLEASE NOTE**]. There will be two sessions, from 11.00 am to 12.30 pm and from 2.00 pm to 4.00 pm

Programme: 11.00-12.30 John Coffey (Leicester), ‘Milton and Augustine revisited’; Nicholas McDowell (Exeter), ‘Milton and Pamela’s Prayer: Revisiting a Cold Case’.

2.00-4.00 Ivana Bičak (Leeds), ‘Gaudensque viam fecisse ruina: The Grotesque Mode in the Epic Poetry of Milton and Lucan’; Cedric Brown (Reading), ‘Milton and Cyriac Skinner revisited’.

The Birmingham and Midland Institute (BMI) was founded by Act of Parliament in 1854, for ‘the Diffusion and Advancement of Science, Literature and Art amongst all Classes of Persons resident in Birmingham and the Midland Counties,’ and continues to pursue these aims. The BMI is located in the heart of Birmingham’s city centre, just a few minutes’ walk from Birmingham New Street, Snow Hill and Moor Street railway stations: Birmingham and Midland Institute Margaret Street Birmingham B3 3BS

Please follow this link for a map of the BMI’s location, and for further information about the BMI and its Library: http://bmi.org.uk/location.html

For further information about the British Milton Seminar, please contact either: Professor Thomas N. Corns (els009@bangor.ac.uk), or Dr Hugh Adlington (h.c.adlington@bham.ac.uk). Thomas N. Corns and Hugh Adlington (Co-convenors)

You can follow the British Milton Seminar at: http://britishmiltonseminar

 

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The first SOAS Research Seminar in Islamic Art of this year takes place on Thursday 24th October, at 5.30 in B111 (as usual). I am pleased to welcome Dr Martínez-de-Castilla-Muñoz, visiting fellow from the University Complutense of Madrid. Looking forward to seeing you there.
 
SIXTEENTH CENTURY BINDINGS IN THE WESTERN ISLAMIC WORLD
Dr. Nuria Martínez-de-Castilla-Muñoz (UCM)

In 1502, the Muslims who lived in the Iberian Peninsula were obliged to convert to Christianity; however, from that date on, some crypto-Islamic communities, called Moriscos, remained in Spain until their final expulsion in 1609. Even if they were obliged to give up their religion, customs and language, they still copied Islamic texts in Spanish in Arabic script (aljamiado), or even in Arabic. When it came to binding their manuscripts, they did not follow the old Islamic techniques, but the Christian ones.

On the other hand, during the same century, Morocco went through a strained political relationship with the Ottoman empire. However, as far as their books were concerned, Moroccan binders tried to follow the Ottoman aesthetical models.

The aim of this presentation is to analyse the bindings among the Islamic communities of these two countries, from a double point of view –technical and aesthetic-, under the paradoxical cultural influence of Christians and Ottomans, respectively.

 

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‘Death in Scotland, from the medieval to the modern: beliefs, attitudes and practices’ (CFP, Conference, Edinburgh, 31 Jan–2 Feb 2014)

‘Death in Scotland, from the medieval to the modern: beliefs, attitudes and practices’

New College, University of Edinburgh,

Friday 31 January 2014 – Sunday 2 February 2014

Plenary speakers include:

• Professor Jane Dawson, John Laing Professor of Reformation History, Edinburgh University: “‘With one foot in the grave”: death in life and life in death in Reformation Scotland’.

• Professor Richard Fawcett, O.D.E., School of Art History, University of St Andrews: ‘The architectural setting of prayers for the dead in later medieval Scotland’.

• Dr Lizanne Henderson, Lecturer in History, School of Interdisciplinary Studies, University of Glasgow:‘Fairies, Angels and the Land of the Dead: Robert Kirk’s Lychnobious People’.

• Professor Sarah Tarlow, Director ofthe Centre for Historical Archaeology, University of Leicester: ‘Beliefs about bodies: contradictions and conundrums in early modern Scotland’.

A plenary panel will discuss childhood death.

This conference invites those who are researching death from whatever disciplinary perspective to offer papers. These will be particularly welcome on the subjects of:

• Death, grief and mourning; • Death, poverty, age gender and status; • Burial and cremation; • Legal and medical aspects of death; • Folklore, customs and rituals; • Death, urban and rural comparisons; • Violent death, including war; • Death in literature and the visual arts; • Plague pestilence and famine; • Theology, liturgy and funeral ministry; • Childhood death; • Architecture, landscape and monuments

Established research and work-in-progress welcomed,

Abstracts of 200 words maximum should be sent by 31 October 2013 to Peter Jupp or Susan Buckham.

For more information, click here.

 

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This Saturday (19th October) a free study day is being held sponsored by the Who Were the Nuns? Project in Brentwood, Essex. Please contact James Kelly on James.Kelly3@durham.ac.uk to find out if there are still places available.

On Saturday 2 November a second event will be held in central Manchester. I am attaching the flyer for the second event.  Please contact c.bowden@qmul.ac.uk if you would like to come. Find out how you can use the database to do Family History and more. All welcome.

 

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Seminar Series 2013-14

Travel: Bodies and Objects in Motion

Convenors: Sandra Cavallo, Jane Hamlett, Stella Moss, Weipin Tsai

Seminar co-ordinator: Charlotte Brown

Seminars will take place at Royal Holloway, 11 Bedford Square, on Wednesdays at 5pm.

 2013

23 October,  Giorgio Riello and Anne Gerritsen (Warwick),‘Spaces of Global Interactions: The Material Landscapes of Global History’

13 November, Ruth Livesey (RHUL), ‘Dickens and America: Transport and the Making of Place in the 1840s’

11 December, Aaron Moore (Manchester), ‘Physical Dimensions of Self: Diaries and Self-Discipline in East Asian Armies, 1937-1945′

2014

29 January, Carl Thompson (Nottingham Trent), ‘Gender and the Romanticization of Travel Writing; Maria Graham’s Journal of a Residence in Chile’

26 February, joint session on letters: Charlotte Brown (RHUL)  ‘The Objects of Men’s Affections in their Letters Home 1760-1830′; Weipin Tsai (RHUL), ‘‘’Bright is the Moon over my Home Village: the Family Letters of Chinese Merchants in Late Qing China’.

12 March, Ann Massey (Middlesex), ‘Bodies at sea: Colonial Discourses and Ocean Liner Design’.

ALL WELCOME!

If you are coming from outside RHUL please notify Charlotte Brown: charlotte.brown.2010 @live.rhul.ac.uk| in advance so that we can let security at Bedford Square know that you are coming.