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Newsletter 50

By Alexander Samson, on 2 December 2014

  1. Between Heaven and Earth: Ecclesiastical Patronage in Europe, 1400-1600. Third Annual Renaissance Postgraduate Symposium. Saturday 9 May 2015 at the Courtauld Institute. Call for papers: Abstracts for 15-20 minute papers, not exceeding 250 words, should be sent with a brief academic CV (100 words) to Lydia Hansell lydia.hansell@courtauld.ac.uk and Joost Joustra joost.joustra@courtauld.ac.uk no later than 2 February 2015.
  2. The Beaumont and Fletcher Project seeks to organise script-in-hand performances of the entire dramatic works of Beaumont & Fletcher. Instigated and coordinated by Dr Steve Orman (Canterbury Christ Church University), the plan is to stage 4 plays a year (tentatively, March, June, September, December), in a variety of performance spaces around Canterbury with a whole host of different directors and different actors, each bringing something new to each play. A website is now live http://thebeaumontandfletcherproject.wordpress.com/ If you would like any further information, please get in touch with Steve at: thebeaumontandfletcherproject@gmail.com Steve will also be tweeting about the project: @Steve_Orman and you can get involved with the conversation by using the hashtag #beaumontandfletcherlive
  3. Early Modern Fiction Seminar, Thursday, December 4th, 6.00 pm, Warburg Institute, Woburn Square, London. Outreach Evening: Early Modern Fiction & the Emotions. Katherine Ibbett (SELCS, University College London) will reconstruct an early modern literary salon – ‘Playing the Game of Love: A Salon Evening’. Please register: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/playing-the-game-of-love-a-salon-evening-tickets-14041296897
    For more info: http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/events/seminars/early-modern-fiction/
  4. Early Modern Forum, Wednesday, 3 December 2014, 1.00 pm, KCL Strand 8.08. ‘Sickness & Melancholy.’ Alice Marples: Managing Sickness in Eighteenth-Century Medical Correspondence. Matthew Bell: What is Early Modern Melancholia? Come and meet your Early Modernist colleagues! Everyone welcome, especially postgraduate students. Feel free to bring your own lunch. Tea & coffee will be provided (first come, first served).
  5. Early Modern Women on Metaphysics, Religion and Science, Conference on 21-23 March 2016, University of Groningen. Call for papers, please email an abstract – maximum 800 words – to Emily Thomas a.e.e.thomas@rug.nl The abstract should be anonymised for blind review, and the email should contain the author¹s details (name, position, affiliation, contact details). The deadline for abstract submission is 20th October 2015. More info: http://www.rug.nl/ggw/news/events/2016/early-modern-women-on-metaphysics-religion-and-science
  6. Open University / Institute of English Studies Book History Research Group seminars at Senate House, London. The topic is Paper, Pen and Ink 2: Manuscript Cultures in the Age of Print. Sessions are at 5.30 on Monday evenings. For further details about this year’s programme, see http://www.open.ac.uk/arts/research/book-history/research-seminar-series/paper-pen-and-ink-2For queries, please contact the organiser, Dr Jonathan Gibson jonathan.gibson@open.ac.uk
  7. 2014 Barry Coward Memorial Lecture on 12 December, Malet Street room B36, 6.30 pm: Professor Bernard Capp, University of Warwick, ‘My Brother¹s Keeper?: siblings and their families in early modern England’. For more information on Professor Capp please see http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/history/people/staff_index/bcapp/
  8. Birkbeck Early Modern Society’s 8th Student Conference: Call for Papers: ‘Feast or Famine in the Early Modern Period.’ Saturday 21 February 2015. Please email your abstract to Dr Laura Jacobs, Birkbeck Early Modern Society bbkems@gmail.comby 5pm on Friday 5 December 2014.
  9. Global and Local Marlowes: A Symposium sponsored by the London Shakespeare Centre and the Marlowe Society of America, 6 December 2014, 09.45-18:00. Old Anatomy Lecture Theatre, King’s College London. For further information visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/ahri/eventrecords/2014-2015/LSC/marlowes.aspx  To register visit: http://estore.kcl.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&deptid=18&catid=36&prodid=462
  10. Teaching Digital Humanities: Wednesday, 10 December 2014, 11am-4pm, Room 111, Palmer Building, University of Reading. To reserve a place or for further information, contact:  Michelle O¹Callaghan m.f.ocallaghan@reading.ac.uk
  11. Making Knowledge in the Renaissance, Thursday 19th March 2015 University of Liverpool. We welcome proposals for 20-minute papers on any aspect of ‘making knowledge’ in the Renaissance, and would welcome contributions from any relevant discipline. Please send 200-word abstracts and 150-word bios to Maria Shmygol maria.shmygol@liverpool.ac.uk and Jonathan Day jonathanjmday@gmail.com by 10th January 2015.
  12. Call for papers: Festschrift Special Edition for Janet Todd. Editors: Ros Ballaster, Mansfield College, University of Oxford and Ruth Perry, MIT, USA, emails: ros.ballaster@mansfield.ox.ac.uk and rperry@mit.edu Please submit for consideration abstracts of at least 250 words by January 5. Finished articles of between 4,000-7000 words must be received by 1 September 2015.
  13. International Academic Conference, Shakespeare and Scandinavia, Kingston University at the Rose Theatre, Kingston-upon-Thames 8-11 October, 2015. Call for Panels and Papers Proposals, with abstracts (200 words) and brief cvs, should be sent by before March 31 2015 to Anne Sophie Refskou and Richard Wilson: shakespeareandscandinavia2015@gmail.com
  14. Travel and Writing in the Global Renaissance: Revisiting the Peregrination
    of Fernão Mendes Pinto (1614-2014.) December 5-6, 2014 (UCL & King’s College London.) A two-day conference bringing together experts in the cultures, literature
    and history of the early-modern Portuguese world to discuss the text of the
    Peregrination of Fernão Mendes Pinto (1614) from a multidisciplinary
    approach. Attendance is free. http://www.academia.edu/9128310/Travel_and_Writing_in_the_Global_Renaissance_Revisiting_the_Peregrination_of_Fern%C3%A3o_Mendes_Pinto_1614-2014_
  15. The deadline for submitting workshop applications for Attending to Women 2015 is approaching, and there are still a few ideas for workshops that have not yet found co-organizers. They are listed below. All of these are wonderful possibilities, and it would be great if they jelled as workshops. You could certainly have some extra time to get them together. If you do work on a topic that fits, and like the sharing of ideas that Attending to Women facilitates, please contact the co-organizer listed here: http://www4.uwm.edu/letsci/conferences/atw2015/workshopideas.cfm
  16. Kingston Shakespeare Seminar, Call for papers: Jan Kott Our Contemporary: Contexts, Legacies, New Perspectives. An international one-day conference, Rose Theatre, Kingston-upon-Thames. Thursday 19 February 2015. If you are interested in participating in Jan Kott Our Contemporary, please send a 200-word abstract with a 50-word cv by December 5 2014 to Aneta Mancewicz and Richard Wilson: kott.london2015@gmail.com
  17. Call for paper proposals: ‘Beyond Leeches and Lepers: Medieval and Early Modern Medicine Conference.’ Anatomy Lecture Theatre, The University of Edinburgh. Saturday 2nd May, 2015. Possible topics for exploration include: anatomy and dissection; plagues, pandemics and diseases; disability and impairment; hospitals and healthcare; surgery, physicians and medical manuscripts; bloodletting, and the bodily humors. Papers should be prepared with a non-expert audience in mind. Please send proposals up to 250 words for 15-20 minutes papers to Helen F. Smith and Jessica Legacy at beyondleechesconference@outlook.comby January 15th, 2015.​
  18. Call for papers: ‘Domestic Devotions in the Early Modern World, 1400-1800’ An Interdisciplinary Conference. July 9-11, 2015. University of Cambridge. Please email abstracts of no more than 300 words to Maya Corry at mc878@cam.ac.uk, Marco Faini at mf531@cam.ac.ukand Alessia Meneghin at am2253@cam.ac.ukby 31 December 2014. Along with your abstract please include your name, institution, paper title and a brief biography. Further details can be found on the project website: http://domesticdevotions.lib.cam.ac.uk/?page_id=3D809
  19. Johnson and Shakespeare, Pembroke College, Oxford, 7-9 August 2015.
    Final Call for Papers. This conference marks the two hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the publication of Samuel Johnson’s The Plays of William Shakespeare. Further information: http://www.pmb.ox.ac.uk/content/johnson-and-shakespeare
  20. British Milton Seminar, 14 March 2015: Call for Papers. The British Milton Seminar will be held on Saturday 14 March 2015. Venue: The Birmingham and Midland Institute on 14 March 2015. There will be two sessions, from 11.00 am to 12.30 pm and from 2.00 pm to 4.00 pm. We currently intend that each session will have two papers (of approx. 25-30 minutes each), for which proposals are invited. Please send proposals to Dr Sarah Knight sk218@leicester.ac.uk and/or Dr Hugh Adlington h.c.adlington@bham.ac.ukby no later than 16 January 2015. For more info: http://britishmiltonseminar.wordpress.com/
  21. Call for Papers: Travel and Conflict in the Medieval and Early Modern World. Institute for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (IMEMS) Aberystwyth-Bangor. Biennial conference, 3rd-5th September 2015, Bangor University. We invite abstracts of 200-250 words for individual papers of twenty minutes, or of up to 850 words for panels comprising no more than three papers, to be sent to travelandconflict@gmail.com by 25th January 2015. Please send your abstract in the text of your message, and not in an attached file. Further details are available via the conference website: travelandconflict.wordpress.com, or you can follow us on Twitter @Travel_Conflict
  22. John Fletcher: A Critical Reappraisal. Friday 26th and Saturday 27th June 2015
    Canterbury Christ Church University. Call for papers: Please send proposals of no more than 300 words for papers lasting 20 minutes in length to Dr Steve Orman (Canterbury Christ Church University) and José A. Pérez Díez (Shakespeare Institute), conference conveners, at the following email address: johnfletcherconference@gmail.com The deadline for sending proposals is Friday 9th January 2015.

Newsletter 49

By Alexander Samson, on 5 November 2014

1. Cambridge Spanish Seminars: http://www.mml.cam.ac.uk/spanish/news/seminars.html

https://www.facebook.com/camhispanic?fref=ts

 

2. The RSA is pleased to announce that the 2015 Research Grant competition is now open. For the 2015 grant cycle, the RSA will award thirty-three (33) individual grants to scholars working in the field of Renaissance Studies. The average grant is $3,000 for one month of research or travel. During the past five years, the RSA has awarded grants to more than 100 scholars working on topics from the fourteenth to the seventeenth century; a list of previous award winners is posted on the RSA website. Additional details about the application process, eligibility, residential awards, non-residential awards, publication subventions, and more are all available at the RSA website: http://www.rsa.org/Grants

 

3. Call for papers for the forthcoming conference, entitled ‘Sister Act: Female Monasticism and the Arts across Europe ca. 1250-1550’, which will take place on Friday 13 March and Saturday 14 March 2015 at The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN. Please send your abstracts of 250 – 300 words and a short biography of 100 words to Laura Llewellyn laura.llewellyn@courtauld.ac.uk and Michaela Zöschg michaela.zoschg@courtauld.ac.uk by 10 December 2014 at the latest.

 

4. EMPHASIS 2014: For the most up-to-date information on the seminar please consult the seminar website: http://events.sas.ac.uk/ies/seminars/180/EMPHASIS+%28Early+Modern+Philosophy+and+the+Scientific+Imagination%29

 

5. The Department of English at the University of Kentucky invites applications for a tenure-track assistant professor in Early Modern literature and culture, 1550-1700. We seek candidates who, regardless of precise areas of specialization, can teach a dynamic lecture course in Shakespeare or a related area and also teach across genres. Publications and/or evidence of scholarly promise are desired, as well as evidence of strong teaching. Applicants should provide: cover letter, CV, writing sample (20-30 pages), teaching statement, and at least three confidential letters of recommendation. Review begins November 15, 2014. https://www.as.uky.edu/faculty-positions

 

6. UCL IMARS Seminar of 2014-15. Please visit: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/mars/seminars-lectures/imars_13_14

 

7. NEW Cultures of Knowledge Seminar Series: The Digital Humanist: Open Resources, Shared Standards, Virtual Communities. Please visit: http://www.culturesofknowledge.org/?page_id=4861

 

8. Birkbeck Early Modern Society’s 8th Student Conference: Call for Papers: ‘Feast or Famine in the Early Modern Period’. We are interested in notions of feasting or famine during the Early Modern Period, 1500-1800. Please send your abstract as a Microsoft word document.Please put your name, programme of study and institution at the top of your abstract. The abstract should be no more than 250 words for papers lasting 20-25 minutes (about 2,000-2,500 words). Please email your abstract to Dr Laura Jacobs, Secretary, Birkbeck Early Modern Society, bbkems@gmail.com by 5pm on Friday 5 December 2014. We will be holding a selection meeting shortly after the deadline and may not be able to consider late submissions.

For details of our aims and events please see http://www.bbk.ac.uk/history/about-us/societies-student-groups/early-modern-society

 

9. The University of Warwick and Queen Mary University of London warmly invite you to the launch of their joint venture Global Shakespeare:

http://www.globalshakespeare.ac.uk

Thursday 13th November, 18.00-20.00, The Barbican, London. This event is an opportunity to come and find out more about Global Shakespeare. Guests will be addressed by Professor Jonathan Bate, Provost of Worcester College, Oxford and renowned Shakespeare scholar and Professor David Schalkwyk, Academic Director of Global Shakespeare, as well as be treated to a short reading from Matthew Hahn’s play The Robben Island Shakespeare by professional actors. We anticipate a high demand for this event so please register your place using the following link. http://bit.ly/1pM2BXS

 

10. The Centro Historia Aquem e Alem-Mar may be of interest. They have quite an active programme that can be followed via their facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/CHAM/1412931452308394?ref=hl Or by requesting an email update via: http://www.cham.fcsh.unl.pt/

 

11. Montevideana IX, International Conference, Cervantes, Shakespeare. Latin American prism, refracted readings. For further information and reception of proposals (before 28/02/15): montevideana2015@gmail.com or visit: www.fhuce.edu.uy/montevideanaIX

 

12. Early Modern Research Events at Keele, Semester 1, 2014/2015. All are welcome. All events take place in CM0.12, Claus Moser Research Centre, Keele University:
http://northwestseminar.wordpress.com/about/ For further details please contact Dr Ian Atherton, i.j.atherton@keele.ac.uk

 

13. The directors’ seminar of the Centre for Early Modern Mapping, News and Networks: http://www.cemmn.net/events/

 

14. Call for papers: Colonial Christian missions and their legacies. An international conference to be held at the University of Copenhagen, 27-29 April 2015. http://australianstudies.ku.dk/staff/claire_mclisky/postdoctoral_project/

 

15. Call for Contributors: Queenship and Counsel in the Early Modern World. Editors: Helen Graham-Matheson (UCL) and Joanne Paul (NCH). This collection attempts to highlight the ways in which queenship and counsel were negotiated and represented throughout the early modern age (1400-1800). Chapter proposals of 500 words, accompanied by a short summary of biography and research interests (maximum of 250 words), must be submitted to queenshipandcounsel@gmail.com by 15 January 2015 to be considered. Accepted authors will be notified by March 2015, and final submissions due Dec 2015.

 

16. AHRC Network ‘Voices and Books 1500-1800’. Public Workshop, Tuesday 11 November, 2014, British Library, convenor Dr Arnold Hunt. This event is free and open to anyone who would like to come. If you are interested in attending, however, please contact the Network Co-ordinator: Helen.Stark@ncl.ac.uk

 

17. Call for Proposals: Attending to Early Modern Women: It’s About Time
June 18-20, 2015 Milwaukee, Wisconsin. A detailed description of the conference and the call for proposals is now available at: www.atw2015.uwm.edu Proposals for workshops that address the conference themes may now be submitted, to atw-15@uwm.edu NEW Deadline: November 15, 2014.

 

18. From 2015, the Hakluyt Society will award an annual essay prize (or more than one, if the judges so decide) of up to a total of £750. Winners will be invited to publish their essays in the online Journal of the Hakluyt Society www.hakluyt.com if they wish to do so. The prize or prizes for 2015 will be presented at the Hakluyt Society’s Annual General Meeting in London in June 2015, where winners will be invited to attend as the Society’s guests; travel expenses within the UK will be reimbursed. Winners will also receive a one-year membership of the Hakluyt Society.

 

19. Seventeenth-Century Journalism in the Digital Age, Saturday 22 November, 10AM – 5.30 PM, University of Sheffield, Jessop West Building. Places at this conference can be reserved online at: http://onlineshop.shef.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&deptid=5&catid=16&prodid=296

 

20. Call for papers: Scrutinizing Surfaces in Early Modern Thought: The Second Northern Renaissance Roses Seminar, 8-9 May 2015. Please send abstracts (c. 250 words) and a brief CV to Kevin Killeen kevin.killeen@york.ac.uk and Liz Oakley-Brown e.oakley-brown@lancaster.ac.uk by 30 November 2014.

 

21. Call for papers: Social Networks 1450-1850, 16/17 July 2015, University of Sheffield. Proposals for 20-minute papers or panels of three speakers are welcome from a wide chronological and geographical reach, exploring social network concepts, methodologies and findings. Deadline for submission of proposals: 31 January 2015. For individual paper proposals, please submit a title and 200-word abstract, along with contact details. For panel proposals, please include a title and 200-word abstract for each paper and contact details for one speaker on the panel. For more information, please contact the conference organizer, Kate Davison kate.davison@sheffield.ac.uk

 

22. The Warburg’s complete Annual Programme is available at

http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/fileadmin/images/events/AnnualProgramme2014_15.pdf

 

23. Registration is now open for the second conference of the ‘Dissenting Experience’ programme at Dr Williams’s Library, on Saturday 8th November 2014. The 2014 conference focuses on the forms of dissenting expression available to dissenters and their congregations, on both sides of the Atlantic, throughout the seventeenth century, and examines the wealth and variety of written materials, both in print and from archival sources, related to the experience of dissent across a wide spectrum of genres. More information and registration on http://dissent.hypotheses.org

 

24. A new publication: Women and Healthcare in Early Modern Europe, a special issue of Renaissance Studies, Vol. 28, no. 4, September 2014; Guest editor: Sharon T. Strocchia, is now available online at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/rest.2014.28.issue-4/issuetoc

 

25. Call for papers: Femmes à la cour de France. Statuts et fonctions (Moyen Âge – XIXe siècle.) Colloque international organisé par Cour de France.fr avec le soutien de l’Institut Émilie du Châtelet, l’Université américaine de Paris et l’Institut d’études avancées de Paris. 8-9 octobre 2015. Nous vous prions de nous faire parvenir un dossier de 2 à 3 pages qui présente la thématique de votre intervention (avec quelques informations sur les archives/sources utilisées) et une courte présentation de vous-même avant le 31 janvier 2015 à zumkolk@cour-de-france.fr et kathleen.wilson-chevalier@wanadoo.fr

 

26. Call for papers: Early Modern Women’s Libraries: Collections, Habits, Experiences. Proposals are sought for panels to be proposed for the annual meeting of Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences to take place at the University of Ottawa, Canada, from 30 May-2 June, 2015. The panels will be jointly sponsored by ACCUTE and the Canadian Society for Renaissance Studies. By Nov. 1, 2014, please send to lknight@brocku.ca, micheline.white@carleton.ca, and esauer@brocku.ca the following: A 300- to 500-word proposal (with NO identifying marks of any kind). A 100 word abstract. A 50 word bio. A 2015 Proposal submission information sheet (required by ACCUTE). The information sheet can be found at http://accute.ca/accute-conference/accute-cfp-jointly-sponsored-sessions/

 

27. Winterthur Research Fellowship Program, 2015–16. Wilmington, Delaware; applications due by 15 January 2015. Winterthur, a public museum, library, and garden supporting the advanced study of American art, culture, and history, announces its Research Fellowship Program for 2015–16. Winterthur offers an extensive program of short- and long-term residential fellowships open to academic, independent, and museum scholars, including advanced graduate students, to support research in material culture, architecture, decorative arts, design, consumer culture, garden and landscape studies, Shaker studies, travel and tourism, the Atlantic World, childhood, literary culture, and many other areas of social and cultural history. Fellowships include 4–9 month NEH fellowships, 1–2 semester dissertation fellowships, and short-term fellowships, which are normally one month. Fellowship applications are due January 15, 2015. For more details and to apply, visitwinterthur.org/fellowship or e-mail Rosemary Krill at rkrill@winterthur.org.

 

28. The International Christopher Marlowe. A 2-day conference at the University of Exeter, 7th – 8th September 2015. We invite proposals for papers of up to 30 minutes on any aspect of the “international” content or contexts of Marlowe and his work. Please send an abstract of no more than 300 words by 14th November 2014 to InternationalMarlowe@exeter.ac.uk

 

29. Poly-Olbion and The Writing of Britain, 10-11 September 2015, Royal Geographical Society, London. Hosted by the Poly-Olbion Project, the conference will explore Michael Drayton’s Poly-Olbion within the wider context of early modern British discourses of space, place, nationhood, and regional identity. The conference will coincide with the opening of a major exhibition and series of public-facing events devoted to Poly-Olbion, derived from the AHRC-funded project and the associated HLF-funded‘Children’s Poly-Olbion’. Papers dealing with aspects of Michael Drayton’s poem, John Selden’s commentary, William Hole’s maps, or the wider context of chorography and cartography in early modern Britain will be welcome. Please send abstracts or full papers to Andrew McRae a.mcrae@exeter.ac.uk and Philip Schwyzer p.a.schwyzer@exeter.ac.uk by 5 January 2015.

 

30. The Third Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies invites proposals for papers, complete sessions, and roundtables. Any topics regarding the scholarly investigation of the medieval and early modern world are welcome. Papers are normally twenty minutes each and sessions are scheduled for ninety minutes. Scholarly organizations are especially encouraged to sponsor proposals for complete sessions. The deadline for all submissions is December 31. Decisions will be made in January and the final program will be published in February. For more information or to submit your proposal online go to http://smrs.slu.edu

 

31. ABOPublic Has Launched: http://www.aphrabehn.org/ABO/ Join the conversation–comment and submit work!

 

32. Call for Papers – Shakespeare Jahrbuch / Yearbook of the German Shakespeare Society. The 2016 volume of Shakespeare Jahrbuch will be a special issue devoted to “Heroes and Heroines”. Papers to be published in the Shakespeare Jahrbuch should be formatted according to our style sheet, which can be downloaded from the website of the German Shakespeare Society at http://shakespeare-gesellschaft.de/en/jahrbuch/note-on-submission.html Please send your manuscripts (of not more than 6,000 words) to the editor of the Shakespeare Jahrbuch, Prof. Dr. Sabine Schülting sabine.schuelting@fu-berlin.de by 31 March 2015.

 

33. CFP for the fifth RefoRC conference is now up. It is held in Leuven, 7-9 May 2015, and deadline for paper proposals is 15 February 2015. The overall theme of plenary lectures is transregional reformations, and communications are encouraged to think about this topic, but not confined to it. The line-up of plenary speakers is spectacular, with amongst others Barbara Diefendorf talking about her current research project on religious orders, Alex Walsham talking about translations, and Grazyna Jurkowlaniec discussing international circulation of printed images. For more information, see: http://bit.ly/1ooelUo

 

34. Call for papers: The Eleventh International Margaret Cavendish Society Conference: 18 to 21 June, 2015. Venue: Nicosia Museum (Centre for Visual Arts and Research), Cyprus. Host: Centre for Visual Arts and Research (CVAR) with the support of the Cornaro Institute, Cyprus College of Art. We will begin considering abstracts on the 1st of September, 2014. Registration form due by November 15th, 2014. Early modernists and modernists from all disciplines (e.g. history of science, literature, philosophy, history, political theory, etc.) are invited to submit proposals for papers related to the theme of the conference. PAPER PROPOSALS: 20-minute papers are invited on topics related directly or indirectly to the theme of the conference. ABSTRACTS of 150 to 200 words should be emailed to the conference
organizers:
Lisa Walters: Elizabeth.walters@ugent.be (President, MCS)
Sara Mendelson: Mendelso@univmail.cis.mcmaster.ca
Brandie Siegfried: Brandie_Siegfried@byu.edu
Jim Fitzmaurice: j.fitzmaurice@sheffield.ac.uk
Alexandra G. Bennett: abennet1@niu.edu

 

35. Difficult Women in the Long Eighteenth Century: 1680-1830, Saturday 28th November, 2015. University of York. Please send abstracts/panel proposals of no more than 500 words todifficultwomenconference@gmail.com by July 1st 2015. Panel proposal submissions should include the full name, affiliation, and email addresses of all participants. http://difficultwomenconference.wordpress.com/call-for-papers/

 

36. ‘Early Modern Catholics in the British Isles and Europe: Integration or Separation?’ 1-3 July 2015, Ushaw College, Durham. Call for Papers: We invite proposals for 20 minute communications on any related theme from any field. The organziers plan to publish a volume of essays drawn from the conference papers. Please send proposals (c. 200 words) by email to James Kelly james.kelly3@durham.ac.uk by 16 January 2015 at the latest.

 

37. The 2015 Queen Elizabeth I Society Annual Meeting will be held in Raleigh, North Carolina, March 12-14, 2015, in conjunction with the South Central Renaissance Conference. Scholars of sixteenth-century history and culture are encouraged to submit a 400–500 word abstract by December 1, 2014. All abstracts must be submitted via the South Central Renaissance Conference website. When asked, “Submit abstract to which organization,” choose QEIS from the pull-down menu, and fill out the form. Then immediately send a brief email giving the title of the paper and the date you submitted the abstract to the President of QEIS, Brandie Siegfried brandie_siegfried@byu.edu

 

38. Visualising and Annotating Hagiographical Material. Joint Workshop sponsored by Northumbria University and Newcastle University. Friday 21 November 2014, 11am–4pm, Venue: Northumbria University, LIP231, Lipman Building. Registration is necessary. Please contact anja-silvia.goeing@northumbria.ac.uk for details. The one-day event offers researchers who work in this thriving field of study to present their research, exchange ideas and discuss current and planned projects. It provides space to launch ideas towards planning an international network of scholars working on commentaries and annotated books. Lunch and coffee will be provided for all. The updated programme is at http://mem2northumbria.wordpress.com/21-november-workshop-on-hagiography-and-commentaries/

 

39. Post-doctoral opportunity: Shakespeare¹s Globe. Globe Education is seeking a short-term Post-doctoral Research Fellow to work on its Global Audiences Research Project related to the Globe Theatre¹s World Hamlet Tour 2014-2016. http://globetoglobe.shakespearesglobe.com/hamlet/research The successful candidate will travel to Eastern and Southern Africa to follow the Globe Tour into each venue and research the audiences in the region. The appointment is from 2 February- 1 July 2015. The tour dates (are not finalised) but currently are scheduled for 1 March- 1 May. The Post-doctoral Research Fellow would return to London and spend four-five months writing up the analysis. Essential to the success of applications will be a Ph.D. in Shakespeare and Performance, and the ability to speak 1 or more African languages. To apply, please send CV, two references and a cover letter outlining qualifications, experience and why you are most suitable for the appointment to Dr Farah Karim-Cooper farah.k@shakespearesglobe.com

 

40. The halved heart: SHAKESPEARE & FRIENDSHIP, 17 – 19 April 2015

Call for Papers: For men and women in Shakespeare’s England, friendship was a relation that spanned the exquisite virtue of amicitia perfecta and the everyday exchanges of neighbourliness and commerce. A friend might be ‘another self’, but it was essential to be wary of false friends or flatterers. The complex nature of early modern friendship was a rich source of inspiration for early modern dramatists.

The conference will conclude on Sunday 19 April with a staged reading by a company of Globe actors of The Faithful Friends (Anon., King’s Men, c.1614).

Proposals of no more than 300 words for papers (or panels of up to three papers) may be submitted to Dr Will Tosh on will.t@shakespearesglobe.com. The deadline for submissions is Friday 12 December 2014. The conference is for scholars and students but is open to all members of the public who are interested in debates about early modern theatre and friendship. shakespearesglobe.com/education

 

41. Society for Neo-Latin Studies: Annual Lecture, November 28th 5 p.m. Warwick in London premises, The Shard (32 London Bridge St, London SE1 9SG) Due to security policy at The Shard, all visitors need to sign in: please contact Dr. Andrew Taylor awt24@cam.ac.uk before November 20th if you would like to attend the lecture. For more info: http://neolatin.lbg.ac.at/conferences/society-neo-latin-studies-annual-general-meeting-and-annual-lecture-2014

 

42. Portrait of a Lady, Friday 14 November 2014, 9.15am – 6.00pm, to be held at the Bath Royal Literary and Scientific Institution (BRLSI), 16-18 Queen Square, Bath BA1 2HN. For more information: https://gallery.mailchimp.com/e5a68f4cdbb6169e536838179/files/Symposium_Programme.pdf

 

43.Dr John Wall, Professor of English at NC State and leader of the Virtual Paul’s Cross project, will be presenting and discussing his work at a free lecture at St Paul’s Cathedral on Saturday 22nd of November 2014. The project has seen literature and architecture researchers collaborating to create a script and build a visual and acoustic model to simulate how John Donne’s 1622 Gunpowder Day sermon would have sounded from different vantage points within the Courtyard of pre-Fire St Paul’s. Please visit the website http://goo.gl/8mjFR0 if you would like to book a place.

 

44.Shakespeare’s Unsung Heroes and Heroines. Call for Statements: Shakespeare Seminar at the Annual Conference of the German Shakespeare Society, Berlin, 23-26 April 2015. Please send your proposals (abstracts of 300 words) and all further questions by 30 November 2014 to the seminar convenors:
Felix Sprang, Humboldt University, Berlin: felix.sprang@hu-berlin.de
Christina Wald, University of Konstanz: christina.wald@uni-konstanz.de

See also: http://shakespeare-gesellschaft.de/publikationen/seminar.html

 

45. Cardiff University’s School of History, Archaeology & Religion is pleased to announce a three-year PhD studentship in early modern history.  The start date of the studentship is 1 January 2015. This studentship is one of two (the other of which will be held at the University of Glasgow) attached to an Arts & Humanities Research Council funded project on ŒWomen negotiating the boundaries of justice: Britain and Ireland, c.1100 ­ c.1750. Full details at: http://courses.cardiff.ac.uk/funding/R2343.html

 

46. Call for Papers: Literature and Philosophy 1500-1700 The Centre for Early Modern and Medieval Studies, CEMMS: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/cems/ at the University of Sussex is pleased to announce its forthcoming Postgraduate Conference on the theme of ‘Literature and Philosophy 1500-1700’, which will take place on the 14th-16th July 2015. Please submit your abstract along with your institution, paper title and a brief biography to litphilconference@sussex.ac.uk by 15th January 2015.

 

47. EDiT/MIMSS Colloquium, Magdalen College Auditorium, Oxford
14th-15th November 2014. For more info: http://estoria.bham.ac.uk/blog/

 

48. VOICES AND BOOKS 1500-1800, July 16th-18th 2015, Newcastle University and City Library, Newcastle. We invite proposals (in English) that address the relationship between orality and literacy in any genre in print or manuscript in any European language. The genres might be literary, religious, musical, medical, scientific, or educational. We encourage proposals that recover diverse communities and readers/hearers. We also welcome papers that consider problems of evidence: e.g. manuscript marginalia; print paratexts; visual representations; as well as non-material evidence (voice; gesture). We will be particularly pleased to receive suggestions for presentations that include practical illustrations, performances or demonstrations. 200-word abstracts for 20-minute papers from individuals and panels (3 speakers) to be sent to voicesandbooks15001800@gmail.com The DEADLINE for abstracts is: Friday 16th January 2015.

 

49. Moveable Types Conference: People, Ideas, and Objects. Cultural Exchanges in early modern Europe. Thursday 27th – Saturday 29th November 2014, University of Kent. Registration: https://kenthospitality.kent.ac.uk/Register/Registration/Welcome.aspx?e=02A7E51490B4F412A6D45A3D0BBC13D8

Deadline for registration is 31st October. For registration after the deadline, please email: moveabletypesconference@gmail.com For more info: http://moveabletypes.wordpress.com/

 

50. Ad Vivum?, which will take place on Friday 21 November 2014, 14.00 – 19.30 (with registration from 13.30)  in the Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre at The Courtauld Institute of Art, and Saturday 22 November 2014, 09.30 – 18.15 (with registration from 09.00), in the Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre at The Courtauld Institute of Art. Ticket/entry details: £25 (£15 students, Courtauld staff/students and concessions) BOOK ONLINE: http://ci.tesseras.com/internet/shop Or send a cheque made payable to ‘Courtauld Institute of Art’ to: Research Forum Events Co-ordinator, Research Forum, The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN, stating the event title, ‘Ad Vivum’. For further information, email ResearchForumEvents@courtauld.ac.uk

 

51. The Intelligent Hand, 1500 – 1800, which will take place on Saturday 8 November 2014, 10.00 – 17.45 (with registration from 9.30) in the Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre at The Courtauld Institute of Art. Ticket/entry details: £16 (£11 students, Courtauld staff/students and concessions) BOOK ONLINE: http://ci.tesseras.com/internet/shop  Or send a cheque made payable to ‘The Courtauld Institute of Art’ to: Research Forum Events Co-ordinator, Research Forum, The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN, stating ‘Sixth Early Modern Symposium’. For further information, email ResearchForumEvents@courtauld.ac.uk

 

52. CALL FOR PAPERS To be presented at the XLI International Symposium of Hispanic Literature. In honor of the 400th anniversary of the publication of the second part of Don Quixote, California State University Dominguez Hills, in conjunction with ILCH, is pleased to announce that on April 15th, 16th, and 17th, 2015 it will host the XLI International Symposium of Hispanic Literature 400 Years with Don Quixote: The Influence of Don Quixote in the Humanities. Spaces are limited. Please, submit your title and 100-word abstracts electronically and as soon as possible (Deadline: February 25th, 2015) to: bgomez@csudh.edu

 

53. Material Culture and Agency, Autumn 2014, 11 Bedford Square, Wednesdays  5.30pm. For more details about the Centre, see our webpage: https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/history/research/researchcentres/csbmc/home.aspx#ad-image-0

 

 

Newsletter 48

By Alexander Samson, on 8 October 2014

1. AHRC Network ‘Voices and Books 1500-1800’ Public Workshop

Tuesday 11 November, 2014 at The Conference Centre at the British Library. This event is free and open to anyone who would like to come. If you are interested in attending, however, please contact the Network Co-ordinator: Helen.Stark@ncl.ac.uk.

 

2. The Afterlife of Classical Latin Satire 10 October 2014

A conference organised by the Department of Greek and Latin and the Department of English at UCL and the Warburg Institute. The conference will be held at the Warburg Institute.  To register: http://store.london.ac.uk/browse/department.asp?compid=1&modid=5&deptid=179

 

3. Call for Proposals: Attending to Early Modern Women: It’s About Time
June 18-20, 2015, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Please send in your workshop proposals! The conference website has a list of people seeking co-organizers for workshops. Check there if you are looking for a possible workshop. If you are seeking a co-organizer, send a message with your idea and contact info to the conference e-mail address and it will be posted there. A detailed description of the conference and the call for proposals is now available at: www.atw2015.uwm.edu

 

4. Hakluyt Society Essay Prize

From 2015, the Hakluyt Society will award an annual essay prize (or more than one, if the judges so decide) of up to a total of £750. Winners will be invited to publish their essays in the online Journal of the Hakluyt Society (www.hakluyt.com) if they wish to do so. For a conspectus of the Society’s history, aims and publications, visit www.hakluyt.com. Submission procedures and deadline: Essays should be submitted as email attachments in Word.doc format to Dr Surekha Davies, Chair of the Essay Prize Committee, at surekha.davies@gmail.comand to Richard Bateman, Administrator of the Hakluyt Society, at office@hakluyt.com by 1 November 2014. The entrant’s name, address (including preferred email address), institutional affiliation (if any, with date of admission), and degrees (if any, with dates of conferment) should appear within the body of the email, together with a note of the title of the submitted essay. The subject line of the email should include the words ‘HAKLUYT SOCIETY ESSAY PRIZE’ and the author’s name. By submitting an essay, an entrant certifies that it is the entrant’s own original work.

 

5. Seventeenth-Century Journalism in the Digital Age.

Saturday 22 November, 10AM – 5.30 PM, University of Sheffield, Jessop West Building. This one-day conference brings together scholars from the Digital Humanities, English Literature, History and Linguistics to reflect upon their research into early printed news (their results, their methods and search practices) and interrogate the ways in which current digital search interfaces might be thought to shape, enhance or constrain research in this area. This conference is part of Sheffield’s ‘Participating in Search Design’ AHRC project http://hridigital.shef.ac.uk/newsbooks-project. Places at this conference can be reserved online at: http://onlineshop.shef.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&deptid=5&catid=16&prodid=296

 

6. CFP: Magic and Intellectual History.

Thursday 5th March 2015 – CREMS, University of York. This symposium will explore the place of magic in the intellectual culture of early modern England and Europe. It will focus on how magic was perceived and understood in philosophical, religious and scientific thought, and the ambivalence that surrounded it as topics of scholarship. Abstracts by 15th October (c. 250 words). Contact: Kevin Killeen, kevin.killeen@york.ac.uk. This symposium is part of a diffuse and ongoing Thomas Browne Seminar that has digressed quite far:  http://www.york.ac.uk/english/news-events/browne/

 

7. Scrutinizing Surfaces in Early Modern Thought: The Second Northern Renaissance Roses Seminar.

May 8th and 9th, 2015. Run jointly by the universities of Lancaster and York, this interdisciplinary seminar takes up and develops Joseph Amato’s trans-historical investigation of how ‘humans, ourselves a body of surfaces, meet and interact with a world dressed in surfaces’ (2013: xv) in the early modern period. Please send abstracts (c. 250 words) and a brief CV to Kevin Killeen (kevin.killeen@york.ac.uk) and Liz Oakley-Brown (e.oakley-brown@lancaster.ac.uk): deadline 30 November 2014).

 

8. Call for papers: Social Networks 1450-1850.

16/17 July 2015, University of Sheffield. Proposals for 20-minute papers or panels of three speakers are welcome from a wide chronological and geographical reach, exploring social network concepts, methodologies and findings. Deadline for submission of proposals: 31 January 2015. For individual paper proposals, please submit a title and 200-word abstract, along with contact details. For panel proposals, please include a title and 200-word abstract for each paper and contact details for one speaker on the panel. For more information, please contact the conference organizer, Kate Davison (kate.davison@sheffield.ac.uk)

 

9. The Warburg’s complete Annual Programme is now available at: http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/fileadmin/images/events/AnnualProgramme2014_15.pdf

Further details about all our events are available on our website at: http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/nc/events/

 

10. Registration is now open for the second conference of the ‘Dissenting Experience’ programme at Dr Williams’s Library, on Saturday 8th November 2014. The 2014 conference focuses on the forms of dissenting expression available to dissenters and their congregations, on both sides of the Atlantic, throughout the seventeenth century, and examines the wealth and variety of written materials, both in print and from archival sources, related to the experience of dissent across a wide spectrum of genres. More information and registration on: http://dissent.hypotheses.org

 

11. Women and Healthcare in Early Modern Europe, a special issue of Renaissance Studies (Vol. 28, no. 4, September 2014; Guest editor: Sharon T. Strocchia), is
now available online at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/rest.2014.28.issue-4/issuetoc

 

12. CFP: Femmes à la cour de France. Statuts et fonctions (Moyen Âge-XIXe siècle).

Institut d’études avancées, Paris, 8–9 October 2015. Proposals due by 31 January 2015. Ce colloque international, pluridisciplinaire et transchronologique a pour objet le statut et les fonctions des femmes de la cour de France : les dames des suites d’honneur, les épouses des grands officiers et ministres, les officiers féminins des maisons royales, les marchandes et autres femmes qui ont séjourné de manière régulière ou irrégulière à la cour. Nous vous prions de nous faire parvenir un dossier de 2 à 3 pages qui présente la thématique de votre intervention (avec quelques informations sur les archives/sources utilisées) et une courte présentation de vous-même avant le 31 janvier 2015 à : zumkolk@cour-de-france.fr ou kathleen.wilson-chevalier@wanadoo.fr

 

13. CFP: Early Modern Women and the Book: Ownership, Circulation, and Collecting.

Proposals are sought for a panel to be proposed for the annual meeting of the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing (SHARP) in Montreal and Longueuil, Quebec, July 6-11, 2015. By Oct. 1, 2014, please send a file containing a 350 word abstract and a 50-word biographical statement to Leah Knight (lknight@brocku.ca), Micheline White (micheline.white@carleton.ca), and Elizabeth Sauer (esauer@brocku.ca) for consideration.

 

14. CFP: Early Modern Women’s Libraries: Collections, Habits, Experiences

Proposals are sought for panels to be proposed for the annual meeting of Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences to take place at the University of Ottawa, Canada, from 30 May-2 June, 2015. The panels will be jointly sponsored by ACCUTE and the Canadian Society for Renaissance Studies.  By Nov. 1, 2014, please send to lknight@brocku.ca, micheline.white@carleton.ca, and esauer@brocku.ca the following: A 300- to 500-word proposal (with NO identifying marks of any kind), a 100-word abstract, a 50-word bio, a 2015 Proposal submission information sheet (required by ACCUTE).  The information sheet can be found at http://accute.ca/accute-conference/accute-cfp-jointly-sponsored-sessions/

 

15. Winterthur Research Fellowship Program, 2015–16.

Wilmington, Delaware; applications due by 15 January 2015. Fellowship applications are due January 15, 2015. For more details and to apply visit: winterthur.org/fellowship or e-mail Rosemary Krill at rkrill@winterthur.org.

 

16. Seventeenth-Century Journalism in the Digital Age

Saturday 22 November, 10AM – 5.30 PM, University of Sheffield, Jessop West Building. This conference is part of Sheffield’s ‘Participating in Search Design’ AHRC project (http://hridigital.shef.ac.uk/newsbooks-project). Places at this conference can be reserved online at: http://onlineshop.shef.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&deptid=5&catid=16&prodid=296

For further information contact Marcus Nevitt m.nevitt@shef.ac.uk

 

17. The International Christopher Marlowe

A 2-day conference at the University of Exeter, 7th – 8th September 2015. We invite proposals for papers of up to 30 minutes on any aspect of the “international” content or contexts of Marlowe and his work. Please send an abstract of no more than 300 words by 14th November 2014 toInternationalMarlowe@exeter.ac.uk. We are also happy to answer any queries relating to the conference.

 

18. Poly-Olbion and the Writing of Britain

10-11 September 2015, Royal Geographical Society, London. Hosted by the Poly-Olbion Project, the conference will explore Michael Drayton’s Poly-Olbion within the wider context of early modern British discourses of space, place, nationhood, and regional identity. The conference will coincide with the opening of a major exhibition and series of public-facing events devoted to Poly-Olbion, derived from the AHRC-funded project and the associated HLF-funded‘Children’s Poly-Olbion’. Papers dealing with aspects of Michael Drayton’s poem, John Selden’s commentary, William Hole’s maps, or the wider context of chorography and cartography in early modern Britain will be welcome.  Please send abstracts or full papers to Andrew McRae (a.mcrae@exeter.ac.uk) and Philip Schwyzer (p.a.schwyzer@exeter.ac.uk) by 5 January 2015.

 

19. The Oxford Traherne: Research Assistant in Early Modern European Bibliography.

The closing date for applications is 1 October 2014. There is no application form; please send applications, including a CV, an account of relevant experience, and the name of one referee to Dr Julia Smith at julia.smith@ell.ox.ac.uk. Applicants should also arrange for their referee to submit a reference by the closing date. Interviews will be held in Oxford, probably in the week beginning 13 October 2014, and shortlisted candidates will be asked to complete a short bibliographical exercise in preparation for the interview. For further information, please contact Dr Julia Smith at julia.smith@ell.ox.ac.uk or Dr Sarah Apetrei at sarah.apetrei@keble.ox.ac.uk.

 

20. The Third Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies invites proposals for papers, complete sessions, and roundtables. Any topics regarding the scholarly investigation of the medieval and early modern world are welcome. Papers are normally twenty minutes each and sessions are scheduled for ninety minutes. Scholarly organizations are especially encouraged to sponsor proposals for complete sessions. The deadline for all submissions is December 31. Decisions will be made in January and the final program will be published in February. For more information or to submit your proposal online go to: http://smrs.slu.edu

 

21. ABOPublic Has Launched: http://www.aphrabehn.org/ABO/

ABO: Interactive Journal for Women in the Arts, 1640-1830 (ISSN 2157-7129) is an open access, interactive, scholarly journal, launched in 2011 by the Aphra Behn Society. The journal is supported by the University of South Florida Tampa Library. The journal focuses on gender and women¹s issues, and all aspects of women in the arts in the long eighteenth century, especially literature, visual arts, music, performance art, film criticism, and production arts. Its public scholarship blog, ABOPublic, publishes shorter articles and interactive content geared toward a public audience. It also houses Ask Aphra, a professional advice column.

 

22. CFP: UNL Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program Conference

The Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln is holding a conference on material culture in the Middle Ages and Renaissance October 1-3, 2015 on the UNL City Campus to celebrate twenty years of our major. We welcome 250 word abstracts on any aspect of this topic. Please send abstracts by October 15 via e-mail to Carole Levin clevin2@unl.edu and Andrea Nicholsandrea.nichols@huskers.unl.edu

 

23. Call for Papers – Shakespeare Jahrbuch / Yearbook of the German Shakespeare Society
The 2016 volume of Shakespeare Jahrbuch will be a special issue devoted to “Heroes and Heroines”. Papers to be published in the Shakespeare Jahrbuch should be formatted according to our style sheet, which can be downloaded from the website of the German Shakespeare Society at http://shakespeare-gesellschaft.de/en/jahrbuch/note-on-submission.html.
Please send your manuscripts (of not more than 6,000 words) to the editor of the Shakespeare Jahrbuch, Prof. Dr. Sabine Schülting, email: sabine.schuelting@fu-berlin.de, by 31 March 2015.

 

24. The Oxford-Globe Forum for Medicine and Drama in Practice

4 October 2014 at the University of Oxford, 10.00am-4.30pm. The theme for October 2014 is Anatomy and Dissection. Papers are informal and are limited to 12-15 minutes; the aim is to enable discussion among different constituencies of interest. To register, go to the calendar at www.gtc.ox.ac.uk/whats-on-calendar.

 

25. CFP: Anglo-Iberian Relations, 1500-1850

Mértola, Portugal, 9-11 April 2015. We are now accepting individual papers, panels, and roundtables by academics and heritage professionals for what is hoped to be the first of a biennial conference in this vibrant field of European History. The conference will also launch a new, interdisciplinary academic-heritage network: ‘Anglo-Iberian Relations, from the Medieval to the Modern.’ Papers should be 20 minutes in length. English is the preferred language of the conference, but papers will be considered in Portuguese and Spanish if a detailed summary can be provided in English. Panelists may talk only on England or Portugal or Spain if so desired; organisers will team them up with panelists covering the other countries on a similar timeframe or topic. Abstracts of up to 300 words for individual papers, and panel/roundtable descriptions, together with details of affiliation and career, should be sent to: anglo.iberian2015@gmail.com no later than 30 October 2014.

 

26. CFP for the fifth RefoRC.

Leuven, 7-9 May 2015, and deadline for paper proposals is 15 February 2015. The overall theme of plenary lectures is transregional reformations, and communications are encouraged to think about this topic, but not confined to it. The line-up of plenary speakers is spectacular, with amongst others Barbara Diefendorf talking about her current research project on religious orders, Alex Walsham talking about translations, and Grazyna Jurkowlaniec discussing international circulation of printed images. For more information, see: http://bit.ly/1ooelUo.

 

27. CFP: The 11th International Margaret Cavendish Society Conference

18 TO 21 June, 2015, Nicosia Museum (Centre for Visual Arts and Research), Cyprus
Host: Centre for Visual Arts and Research (CVAR) with the support of the Cornaro Institute, Cyprus College of Art. Theme: Mediterranean and cross-cultural influences upon Cavendish’s writings. Registration form due by November 15th, 2014. Paper proposals: 20-minute papers are invited on topics related directly or indirectly to the theme of the conference. Abstracts of 150 to 200 words should be emailed to the conference organizers.

Lisa Walters: Elizabeth.walters@ugent.be (President, MCS)
Sara Mendelson: Mendelso@univmail.cis.mcmaster.ca
Brandie Siegfried: Brandie_Siegfried@byu.edu
Jim Fitzmaurice: j.fitzmaurice@sheffield.ac.uk
Alexandra G. Bennett: abennet1@niu.edu

 

28. CFP: Difficult Women in the Long Eighteenth Century: 1680-1830

Saturday 28th November, 2015, University of York, Berrick Saul Building.

http://difficultwomenconference.wordpress.com/call-for-papers/

Please send abstracts/panel proposals of no more than 500 words todifficultwomenconference@gmail.com by July 1st 2015.
Panel proposal submissions should include the full name,
affiliation, and email addresses of all participants.

 

29. Radical Women: 50 Years of Feminism at Kent “Austerity, Gender and Household Finances” University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent. 27-28 June 2015

Submission of abstracts: Interested scholars are kindly asked to send an abstract of 200-300 words to: Kentausterityconference@kent.ac.uk by 15 October 2014. Notifications of acceptance will be sent in mid-November 2014.

 

30. CFP ‘Early Modern Catholics in the British Isles and Europe: Integration or Separation?’ 1-3 July 2015 Ushaw College, Durham

We invite proposals for 20 minute communications on any related theme from any field. The organziers plan to publish a volume of essays drawn from the conference papers. Please send proposals (c. 200 words) by email to James Kelly (james.kelly3@durham.ac.uk) by 16 January 2015 at the latest.

 

31. Criminal Law and Emotions in European Legal Cultures: From 16th Century to the Present 21-22 MAY 2015
Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin, Center for the History of Emotions. If you are interested in participating in this conference, please send us a proposal of no more than 300 words and a short CV by 1 October 2014 to cfp-emotions@mpib-berlin.mpg.de. Papers should be no longer than 20 minutes, in order to allow time for questions and discussion.

 

32. The 2015 Queen Elizabeth I Society Annual Meeting will be held in Raleigh, North Carolina, March 12-14, 2015, in conjunction with the South Central Renaissance Conference. Scholars of sixteenth-century history and culture are encouraged to submit a 400–500 word abstract by December 1, 2014. For more info, please visit: http://www.scrc.us.com/

 

33. Memory, Emotion and Nationalism, Friday October 10th, 5.30-7.30, Institute of Historical Research, Wolfson Room I

Naomi McAreavey:  ‘The Border between Memory and Forgetting: Northern Ireland and the 1641 depositions project’ Respondents: Rosalind Carr, on Scottish nationalism and the early modern; Katharine Hodgkin, on history and trauma

Conversations and Disputations

Raphael Samuel History Centre/ Memory and Community in Early Modern Britain event

Newsletter 47

By Alexander Samson, on 30 July 2014

 

 

1. Call for book manuscripts, MAPS, SPACES, CULTURES. Authors are cordially invited to write to either of the series editors, Surekha Davies (surekha.davies@gmail.com) and Asa Simon Mittman (asmittman@mail.csuchico.edu), or to the publisher at Brill, Arjan van Dijk (dijk@brill.com), to discuss the submission of proposals and/or full manuscripts.

2. Registration is now open for the conference of the international Leverhulme Network ‘Cartography between Europe and the Islamic World, 1100–1600’. The conference aims to promote comparative, cross-disciplinary scholarship on Islamic and European cartography by bringing together experts in these two fields. For further information and to register, see http://www.cartography.qmul.ac.uk/.

3. CALL FOR PAPERS: Fourteenth Round Table on Tudor Theatre: Folly’s Family, Folly’s Children (Centre d’Études Supérieures de la Renaissance, Université de Tours); 3-4 September 2015. Proposals (200 words) for thirty-minute papers in English should be directed to Richard Hillman (rhillman@sfr.fr) by 15 September 2014.    

4. The Women’s Studies in Religion Program at Harvard Divinity School announces its 2015-16 search.  Five scholars will be appointed to spend a year working on a book-length research project advancing our knowledge of religion and gender.  Please email nominations to Tracy Wall, WSRP Program Coordinator, atwsrp@hds.harvard.edu or feel free to forward the link to the online application (http://wsrp.hds.harvard.edu/apply). 

5. AD VIVUM? Friday 21 and Saturday 22 November 2014 at the Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN. Please send proposals of no more than 250 words by 15 August 2014 to joanna.woodall@courtauld.ac.uk and thomas.balfe@courtauld.ac.uk

6. The Afterlife of Classical Latin Satire, 10 October 2014. A conference organised by the Department of Greek and Latin and the Department of English at UCL and the Warburg Institute. The conference will be held at the Warburg Institute. To register, please go to:
http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/events/colloquia-2014-15/satire-ancient-and-modern/

7. Collecting Texts & MSS, 1660-1860 is a scholarly conference covering all aspects of book collecting, manuscript and archive conservation, libraries and private collections, and associated areas of interest from the Restoration to the high Victorian period. It is hosted by Plymouth University and the Cottonian Collection.
More information can be found in the links below. Please do contact one of the organizers, Dr Bonnie Latimer (bonnie.latimer@plymouth.ac.uk) or Dr Annika Bautz (annika.bautz@plymouth.ac.uk<mailto:annika.bautz@plymouth.ac.uk>) with any queries. http://collectingbooks2015.wordpress.com/ and http://www1.plymouth.ac.uk/research/humpa/news/Pages/default.aspx

8. Hester Pulter, No longer ‘shut up in a country grange.’ Evening Talk, Thursday 23rd October. https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/hester-pulter-evening-talk-thursday-23rd-october-tickets-12088857097

9. Two Global Shakespeare Research Fellows through Warwick. http://bit.ly/1qKtTDkhttp://bit.ly/1qKtTDk

For more info: www.globalshakespeare.ac.uk 

10. Registration is now open for the Edinburgh Centre for the History of the Book’s one-day conference titled “Creativity and Commerce in the Age of Print”! The programme includes a range of papers from a very diverse group of postgraduates and early-career researchers on topics including authorship, publishing, and professionalisation from the Early Modern period to today, as well as keynotes by Dr. Jason Scott-Warren (Director of the Centre for Material Texts, University of Cambridge) and Professor Iain Stevenson (Centre for Publishing, UCL).

Full programme information can be found at our Eventbrite page, where you can register to attend:
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/creativity-and-commerce-in-the-age-of-print-tickets-12040963847

11. COLLOQUE INTERNATIONAL / INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE, 19-20 septembre 2014 / 19-20 September 2014. Institut du Monde Anglophone, 5 rue de l’Ecole de Médecine, 75006 Paris, Grand Amphi.
La nuit des sens: Rêves et illusions des sens en Angleterre et en Europe à  la période moderne. / The Night of the Senses : Dreams and Sensory Illusion  in Early-Modern England and Europe.
Contact: line.cottegnies@univ-paris3.fr miller-blaise.am@wanadoo.fr http://epistemeparis3.wordpress.com/

12. Diplomacy and Culture in the Early Modern World. The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities 31 July to 2 August 2014. For more info, please visit www.textualambassadors.org.

13. Call for papers from the Women’s Studies Group: 1558-1837 (London). The Women’s Studies Group: 1558-1837 is a small, informal multi-disciplinary group formed to promote women’s studies in the early modern period and the long eighteenth century. The group was established to enable those interested in women’s studies to keep in touch with each other, to hear about members’ interests and relevant publications, and to organise regular meetings and an annual workshop (see membership application form) where members can meet and discuss women’s studies topics. We can also offer advice and opportunities to engage in activities that increase opportunities for publication, or enhance professional profiles in other ways. The group meets in Senate House, Malet Street, University of London.

www.womensstudiesgroup.org.uk provides more information.

14. The Fifteenth Century Conference 2014. A draft programme is now available, as are links to travel information. Online registration will open shortly, closing on 31 July 2014. Please register early. We look forward to welcoming you to Aberdeen.

www.abdn.ac.uk/nsw/fifteenthcenturyconference

15. Early Modern Commons website: http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/

EMC is an aggregator for blogs covering the period c.1500-1800. It is intended as a resource to help readers to keep up with early modern blogging, and to connect with people who share their interests. There are several interesting sites dedicated to the early modern period and gender. If you visit the blogroll you will find a list of the sites:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/blogs And if you are a Twitter user, please come and follow us (@WSGUK)

16. Moveable Types: People, Ideas, and Objects. Cultural exchanges in early modern Europe, 27-29 November, 2014, University of Kent. Call for Papers Abstracts should be sent to moveabletypesconference@gmail.com before 1st of August 2014 and should not be longer than 300 words. Please include affiliation and contact information, as well as a short biographical note, on a separate document. For more information please visit http://moveabletypes.wordpress.com/ or e-mail moveabletypesconference@gmail.com.

17. Take part in the World Shakespeare Congress “Creating and Re-creating Shakespeare” from 31 July – 6 August 2016, London and Stratford-upon-Avon. Proposals of 500 words for seminars, panels, and workshops may be submitted towsc2016@contacts.bham.ac.uk by 30 September 2014. Click here to download further details http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/centres/lsc/Documents/World-Shakespeare-Conference-2016.pdf 

18. The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography has added entries of early modern nuns to their database. Links to all of the articles have been collected on one webpage:http://fdslive.oup.com/www.oup.com/academic/pdf/online_products/ODNB_May_Update_Flyer_FINAL.pdf

The religious women are: Joanne Berkely, Mary Browne, Anne Cary (and her sisters), Margaret Clement, Mary Dennett, Francis Dickinson, Catherine Gascoigne, Catherine Holland, Margaret and Elizabeth Mostyn, Elizabeth Sander, Margaret Throckmorton, Anne Worsley.

19. AHRC network meeting for ‘Voices and Books’ Monday 8 September, 2014, Strathclyde University, Glasgow. This event is free and open to anyone who would like to come. If you are interested in attending, however, please contact the Network Co-ordinator: Helen.Stark@ncl.ac.uk.

20. Renaissance Cardinals: Diplomats and Patrons in the Early-Modern World. Location: Saint Mary’s University, Twickenham, London Dates: 13-14 March 2015

Enquiries and Proposals for 20 minute papers or panels of 3-4 papers should be sent to Glenn.Richardson@smuc.ac.uk or Eugenia.Russell@smuc.ac.uk by 15 September 2014. Individual paper proposals should be no more than 300 words. Panel proposals should include abstracts of all papers (max 300 words) and a brief rationale (max 100 words) for the panel. All proposals should be accompanied by a short statement of affiliation and career. Delegates will be notified by 15 October 2014.

21. Conference: New Directions in Early Modern Women’s Letters. Conference to be held at History Faculty, Oxford University, Thursday 14 August – Friday 15 August 2014. Registration and programme details are available on the IHR events website: http://events.history.ac.uk/event/show/13038?ref=email

22. The Spiritual Geopolitics of the Early Modern World (1500-1800). March 13, 2015 – Service Historique de la Défense, Château de Vincennes (France). Proposals, which should not exceed 500 words, should be sent by September 15, 2014 to lauric.henneton@uvsq.fr. Papers, which will be precirculated, are due by Feb. 15, 2015. They may be in French or English. http://redehja.hypotheses.org/263

Newsletter 46

By Alexander Samson, on 23 May 2014

1. Romance and its Transformations, 1550-1750, June 30th and July 1st, 2014, Chawton House Library, UK. For further information, including a full programme of speakers and registration details, see: https://sites.google.com/a/morris.umn.edu/romance-transformations/

2. The University of Birmingham Institute of Advanced Studies (IAS). Wednesday 18th June 2014, Barber Institute of Fine Arts 4.30- 5.30pm. Challenges for Early Modern Women’s History. Professor Lisa Jardine in conversation with IAS Distinguished Visiting Fellow Dr Nadine Akkerman. There will be opportunities for questions and a networking reception. The event is free but booking is essential.

3. CFP Renaissance Society of America conference in Berlin 2015:  Early Modern Hybridity and Globalization: Artistic and Architectural Exchange in the Iberian World. Please send your proposals, an abstract of no more than 150 words, and a short CV, no longer than one side of an A4 sheet of paper, to the co-chairs, Laura Fernández-González, University of Edinburgh (laura.fernandez-gonzalez@ed.ac.uk / laura.fernandezgonzalez@gmail.com), and Marjorie Trusted, Victoria & Albert Museum (m.trusted@vam.ac.uk) before 2 June 2014. Link:  http://www.rsa.org/blogpost/1134779/187566/Early-Modern-Hybridity-and-Globalization-Artistic-and-Architectural-Exchange-in-the-Iberian-World

4. Women’s Scientific Travelling Before 1850: An Interdisciplinary Workshop Registration form and programme now available here:http://events.sas.ac.uk/imlr/events/view/16001/Women%27s+Scientific+Travelling

5. Two fully funded PhD studentships are available in the Department of English and Drama. For further details of the Department’s current research and information about how to apply please go to: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/english-drama/postgraduate-research/newphdstudentshipsannounced/
Please note that the deadline for applications is Monday 2 June 2014. Initial queries should be sent to Dr Jenny Fry (j.fry@lboro.ac.uk) or Mrs C.J. Flynn (C.J.Flynn-Ryan@lboro.ac.uk).

6. Society for the Study of Early Modern Women 86th annual conference in Atlanta, Georgia from November 7-9, 2014. Please visit our website for more information about the conference. We welcome you to submit a Call for Papers for us to publicize on our website list.

7. CFP for a panel at the Renaissance Society of America Conference, Berlin, 26-28 March 2015. Women Chroniclers and Historians in the Renaissance. Renaissance women, most of them nuns, wrote histories and memoirs.  This panel will explore convent chronicles and other forms of historical writing by women during the Renaissance and Early Modern Period.  In particular we hope to highlight women whose chronicles and histories pre-date the Reformation. Please send proposals (150-word abstracts), along with brief narrative CVs, to Kathleen Comerford, kcomerfo@georgiasouthern.edu.

8. Kluge Center Announces Call for Kluge Fellowship Applications—Dispatch May 2, 2014. The John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress is now accepting applications for Kluge Fellowships. The application deadline is July 15, 2014.

9. CFP SSEMW-sponsored session for the annual meeting of the College Art Association. The conference will be held in New York on Feb. 11-14, 2015. The Spectatrix in Early Modern Art. Society for the Study of Early Modern Women 2015 College Art Association. Please send paper proposals of 300-500 words to Maria Maurer at maria-maurer@utulsa.edu by May 23, 2014.

10. CFP for a forthcoming volume for Intersections, Yearbook for Early Modern Studies, entitled “The Global Republic of Sacred Things: The Circulation of Religious Art in the Early Modern World.” Please contact mia.mochizuki@nyu.edu or christine.goettler@ikg.unibe.ch

11. The Warburg Institute Public Lectures: http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/fileadmin/images/events/AnnualProgramme2013_14.pdf Further details about all our events are available on our website at: http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/nc/events/

12. Cultural Production in the Early Modern Household, a One-Day Colloquium. The University of Birmingham Centre for Reformation and Early Modern Studies (CREMS) 2014 Colloquium will take as its theme Cultural Production in the Early Modern Household, and will take place at the Shakespeare Institute, Stratford-upon-Avon, on Saturday 28 June 2014 (10.30 am – 5.45 pm). Please book by Friday 30 May, via the University of Birmingham online shop: http://shop.bham.ac.uk/College of Arts and Law/Cultural Production in the Early Modern Household. For further information, please email: Caroline Ashton (c.e.ashton@bham.ac.uk), CAL Events Manager.

13. Three fully-funded PhD studentships on ‘Cultures of Consumption in Early Modern Europe’, starting in autumn 2014. Closing date for applications: 5pm, Friday 13th June 2014. Further details about the doctoral training and opportunities offered by WRoCAH can be found at: www.arts-and-humanities.whiterose.ac.uk. Queries about the network should be directed to the network co-ordinator, Prof Cathy Shrank,c.shrank@shef.ac.uk.

14. There will be a 10-month Teaching Fellowship in early modern English literature at Bristol University http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AIQ500/teaching-fellow-in-early-modern-english-literature/

15. Friday, 23 May, Birkbeck, 6.30 pm. ‘How Happy’s the State where no Discord is Breeding?': the Politipop of Seventeenth Century England.’ This event is free to members (membership £7) and £4 for  non-members, refreshments will be provided. http://www.bbk.ac.uk/history/current-students/societies-student-groups/early-modern-society

16. A new series for the University of Nebraska Press on early modern cultural studies. The first book has just been published: Raymond Anselment, ed., Alice Thornton, My First Booke of My Life.  https://www.nebraskapress.unl.edu/product/My-First-Booke-of-My-Life,675837.aspx

17. Research in Action workshops at the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse, Shakespeare’s Globe. To book, please call 020 7401 9919, or visit shakespearesglobe.com/education

18. Scholarship, Science and Religion in the Age of Isaac Casaubon (1559-1614) and Henry Savile (1549-1622). Oxford’s Centre for Early Modern Studies 6th Annual Conference, T.S. Eliot Theatre, Merton College, Tuesday 1st – Thursday 3rd July 2014. Plenary speaker: Anthony Grafton (Princeton). To find out more, and to register, please follow the link to our conference site: http://www.cems-oxford.org/scholarship-science-religion

19. Centre for Renaissance & Early Modern Studies, Seminars, Conferences, Events in Summer 2014 www.york.ac.uk/crems crems-enquiries@york.ac.uk

20. Medieval and Renaissance Lost Libraries: 2014 LIHG Conference. For more info:  www.lihg.org/conference

21. Applications are now being accepted for two PhD Scholarships affiliated with the ERC-funded project, RECIRC: The Reception and Circulation of Early Modern Women’s Writing, 1550-1700, at the National University of Ireland, Galway. Both scholarships will commence in September 2014. For further information, see http://www.nuigalway.ie/english/recirc_phd_scholarship.html.

22. BRITISH ACADEMY SHAKESPEARE LECTURE ‘The two hours’ traffic of our stage’: Wednesday 21 May 2014, 6-7.15pm. Venue: Sam Wanamaker Playhouse, Shakespeare’s Globe, London. Admission to this event is Free but you are required to register on the British Academy website in order to book online: http://www.britac.ac.uk/events/2014/The_Two_Hours_Traffic_of_Our_Stage.cfm

23. Renaissance Events in Birkbeck Arts Week 2014. All events in School of Arts, 43 Gordon Square http://www.bbk.ac.uk/arts/about-us/events/arts-week

24. Registration is now open for the International Symposium on Sir David Lyndsay’s A Satire of the Three Estateswhich will take place at Pollock Halls of Residence, Edinburgh, on 6-8th June 2014. http://www.stagingthescottishcourt.org/ The full symposium programme along with links to registration can be found at this address: http://www.stagingthescottishcourt.org/events/international-symposium-on-sir-david-lyndsays-a-satire-of-the-three-estates/

25. Come and have some fun at the latest production for my company Mercurius (www.mercuriustheatre.co.uk), a little known Thomas Middleton City Comedy to be performed at The Rose Playhouse around the foundations of the oldest theatre in Bankside.  The Rose was built in 1587 and was home to Philip Henslow’s company, worth a visit in its own right www.rosetheatre.org.uk

26. On the evening of Wednesday, 4 June, there will be a panel debate on David Lyndsay’s 16th-century Scots play, “A Satire of the Three Estates,” taking place at the Scottish Parliament Building in Edinburgh. Featuring a cast of political, theatrical, and academic luminaries, it’s sure to be a fascinating discussion. Please email me by 19 May if you would like to attend, and do pass on the attached poster to anyone who might be interested.
N.Simonova@ed.ac.uk

27. Catholicism in Court and Country, c. 1558-1625. Saturday 20 September 2014 at the Department of History, University of Essex. To register, see: http://www.essex.ac.uk/history/news_and_seminars/catholicism.aspx

28. The fantastic early modern Catholicism network in Oxford has put up an exciting programme of speakers for this term’s seminar series -amongst other Alex Walsham, Tara Alberts, and our very own Victoria Van Hyning. Further information can be found here: http://emcoxford.wordpress.com/. The same network is also organising a workshop on Catholic life-writing on 31 May, for which attendance is free, but early registration is necessary: http://www.torch.ox.ac.uk/early-modern-catholic-life-writing.

29. Classical Philosophers in Seventeenth Century English Thought – York CREMS. 28 May 2014, Treehouse, Humanities Research Centre, University of York, 10.30-5.30. Open to all – entrance free and no registration required. Contact: kevin.killeen@york.ac.uk and http://www.york.ac.uk/english/news-events/browne/

30. Ben Jonson in Print and Online. Special Collections, The Brotherton Library, University of Leeds. Friday 30 May 2014, 12.00-6.30. This event will celebrate the publication of The Cambridge Edition of the Works of Ben Jonson. Members of the CWBJ team will be discussing the challenge of editing Jonson, and the opportunities provided by the dual format of 7-volume print edition and dynamic website. There is no charge for attendance. Refreshments will be provided, but please register in advance with Martin Butler (m.h.butler@leeds.ac.uk)

31. Nuns Literacies – 29-30 August 2014 University of Glasgow. The annual conference registration and programme are now available. To register follow the link below:www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/nuns-literacies-medieval-to-modern-registration-11289981639 Any questions, please contact the conference organisers: hwrbi.conference@gmail.com

32. Annual conference of IASEMS (Italian Association of Shakespearean and Early Modern Studies – http://www.maldura.unipd.it/iasems/). The conference this year is dedicated to “Maps and Borders” – it will take place at the end of May in Lecce, and our plenary speakers are Sonia Massai and Janet Clare. The programme (not complete yet) is available at http://www.studiumanistici.unisalento.it/web/6038738/100

33. The Elizabeth Montagu Project has been awarded an AHRC Collaborative PhD studentship. http://www.swansea.ac.uk/riah/graduate-centre/scholarshipsandbursaries/digitising-elizabeth-montagu’s-correspondence/

34. Dan Geffrey with the New Poete: Reading and Rereading Chaucer and Spenser. 11th-13th July 2014. Clifton Hill House, University of Bristol. http://www.bristol.ac.uk/arts/research/events/conferences/cspenser/

35. Journal of Early Modern Studies (JEMS),Instruments and Arts of Inquiry: Natural History, Natural Magic and the Production of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe, Editors Dana Jalobeanu, Cesare Pastorino.  You can find the table of contents of the latest issue at the following website: http://zetabooks.metapress.com/content/122758/

36. Book History in Global Context. A book history research network. Study Day on Print Culture in Global and Transnational Context. Centre for Urban History, University of Leicester, Friday, 23 May 2014.  Book History Research Network: http://www.bookhistory.org.uk Centre for Urban History: http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/urbanhistory

37. Dramatizing Penshurst: Site, Scripts, Sidneys conference to be held at Penshurst Place on 8-9 June, featuring a ‘Read not Dead’ staged reading of Lady Mary Wroth’s Love’s Victory by Globe Education. The conference website can be found at: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/dramatizing-penshurst/

38. Scholarship, Science and Religion in the Age of Isaac Casaubon (1559-1614) and Henry Savile (1549-1622) Oxford’s Centre for Early Modern Studies 6th Annual Conference. Tuesday 1st – Thursday 3rd July 2014 http://www.cems-oxford.org/scholarship-science-religion

39. Hester Pulter, Research, Teaching and Learning. Monday 23rd June 2014, 2pm – 6pm. The Postgraduate Hub, Senate House, University of Warwick. An afternoon conference to celebrate the launch of Poems, Emblems and The Unfortunate Florinda, edited by Alice Eardley. Refreshments will be provided. For more info: Hesterpulter2014@gmail.com

40. Early Modern Prophecies Conference (26-28 June, Goldsmiths, London) http://www.gold.ac.uk/history/research/panaceasociety/propheciesconference/

41. Post-doctoral fellowships in the early modern period. Further information at http://www.crassh.cam.ac.uk/applications/

42. Heather Wolfe will be talking about early modern writing paper at the next seminar in this year’s Open University Book History Research Group series. The seminar will take place on Monday 14 April at Senate House in London, at 5.30pm. The complete programme can be downloaded at http://www.open.ac.uk/arts/research/book-history/sites/www.open.ac.uk.arts.research.book-history/files/files/ecms/arts-bh-pr/web-content/paper-pen-ink.pdf

43. Six new Research Associate posts in the Early Modern period http://www.english.cam.ac.uk/jobs/crossroads-further-particulars.pdf and http://www.crassh.cam.ac.uk/about/news-press/announcing-eight-new-research-associate-posts-in-the-early-modern-period

44. Post-Graduate Travel Grants. David Nichol Smith Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Studies XV ‘Ideas and Enlightenment’ at the University of Sydney (10-13 December). Application forms are available to download from the conference webpage: http://sydney.edu.au/intellectual-history/news-events/dns-conference-2014.shtml.

45. Contributions are invited towards the first volume of essays on Sir John Denham (1615–1669), author of Cooper’s Hill and The Sophy, with publication timed to coincide with the 400th anniversary of his birth. Please contact Dr Philip Major at Birkbeck College, University of London, philip.major@bbk.ac.uk

46. Ars effectiva et methodus: the Body in early modern science and thought. Conference at the Herzog August Library Wolfenbüttel, 30 June – 1 July 2014 http://10times.com/ars-effectiva-et-methodus-body-in-early-modern-science-and-thought

47. Scholarship, Science & Religion in the Age of Isaac Casaubon (1559 – 1614) and Henry Savile (1549 – 1622). T.S. Eliot Theatre, Merton College, Tuesday 1st – Thursday 3rd July 2014. Oxford’s Centre for Early Modern Studies 6th Annual Conference: http://vimeo.com/94141243

48. Dr Angela McShane, V&A, ‘How Happy’s the State where no Discord is Breeding?': the Politipop of Seventeenth Century England. The event will take place on Friday 23 May at Birkbeck room MAL G16 at 6.30pm. For more info: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/history/current-students/societies-student-groups/early-modern-society

49. CFP for a panel at the Renaissance Society of America conference in Berlin 26-28 March 2015: Women’s Active Religious Communities in Early Modern Europe and Beyond. Please e-mail a title, abstract (150-word maximum), keywords, a one-page curriculum vitae (300-word maximum), and A-V requests (if any) to both Liise Lehtsalu (liise_lehtsalu@brown.edu) and Sarah Moran (Sarah.Moran@UAntwerpen.be) by May 31.  http://rsa.site-ym.com/blogpost/1134786/188213/Women-s-Active-Religious-Communities-in-Early-Modern-Europe-and-Beyond

50. University College London, Friday, July 11 2014 – Saturday, July 12 2014: Objects, Families, Homes: British Material Cultures in Global Contexts, is a two-day end-of-project conference organized by UCL History’s Leverhulme Trust-funded East India Company at Home team. Book here: http://onlinestore.ucl.ac.uk/browse/product.asp?compid=1&modid=2&catid=119.

51. Emotion, Embodiment and Death Symposium, 2-3 June 2014. Centre for the History of the Emotions
Queen Mary, University of London. If you wish to attend any of the sessions, please email: e.carrera@qmul.ac.uk

52. Platonic Commentaries in the Renaissance, 10.30-5.30, Wednesday 11 June 2014, Birkbeck, Malet Street, Room 351, University of London. Please email s.clucas@bbk.ac.uk or john.sellars@bbk.ac.uk if you would like to book a place.

53. The EMREM Symposium 2014 ‘Seen & Unseen: (De)Constructing Medieval and Early Modern Perceptions’ will take place on Thursday 22 and Friday 23 May at the University of Birmingham. Please note that we are also hosting a wine reception on the Thursday evening from 5pm in the Fage Library. If you are unable to attend during the day, please do feel free to join us for some networking over wine, juice and nibbles! For more info: http://emremforum.wordpress.com/2014/04/04/emrem-annual-postgraduate-symposium-2014/

54. SCEMS Visiting Speaker Series: Andrew Hadfield, ‘A Red Herring’ May 22nd, 5:30-7:30pm. Visiting Speaker Masterclass: Friday, May 23rd, 10am-12pm, Humanities Research Institute, Gell St., Sheffield, “Why Does Biography Matter?” For more info: http://www.scems.group.shef.ac.uk/ Please email  g.schwartzleeper@sheffield.ac.uk to sign up and make certain you have a place.

55. Scholarship, Science & Religion in the Age of Isaac Casaubon (1559 – 1614) and Henry Savile (1549 – 1622). T.S. Eliot Theatre, Merton College. Tuesday 1st – Thursday 3rd July 2014. Oxford’s Centre for Early Modern Studies 6th Annual Conference: http://vimeo.com/94141243

Newsletter 45

By Alexander Samson, on 3 April 2014

1. CECS Colloquium to celebrate the work of Harriet Guest: Saturday 17th May 2014 ‘Sound Words, Strange Tattoos and Unbounded Attachments: Celebrating the Works of Harriet Guest’ at the King’s Manor, organised by Emma Major.  For more info: http://www.york.ac.uk/eighteenth-century-studies/

2. Call for Proposals: Attending to Early Modern Women: It’s About Time. June 18-20, 2015, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. A detailed description of the conference and the call for proposals is now available at:www.atw2015.uwm.edu Proposals for workshops that address the conference themes may now be submitted, to atw-15@uwm.edu. Deadline: September 30, 2014.

 3. Kingston Shakespeare Seminar, Spring 2014, by Johann Gregory. SHAKESPEARE AND LAW. For more info: http://cardiffshakespeare.wordpress.com/2014/02/06/kingston-shakespeare-seminar-spring-2014/.

4. The Place of Spenser / Spenser’s Places, Dublin, 18-20 June 2015. The Fifth International Spenser Society Conference. The International Spenser Society invites proposals for their next International Conference, to be held in Dublin, Ireland. The conference will address Spenser’s places – domestic, urban, global, historical, colonial, rhetorical, geopolitical, etc. – but also the place of Spenser 
in Renaissance studies, in the literary tradition, in Britain, in Ireland, in the literary and political cultures of his own moment. Abstracts should be submitted directly to the conference website: 
www.spenser2015.com. The closing date for submissions is 15 September 2014. We also invite proposals for poster-board demonstrations of relevant digital and other projects. http://www.english.cam.ac.uk/spenseronline/iss/ 

5. CFP ‘Missionaries, Materials and the Making of the Modern World’ in Cambridge 15-17 September. For more information contact Dr Chris Wingfield cw543@cam.ac.uk, Senior Curator (Archaeology) Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology,University of Cambridge. To submit an abstract email, ga343@cam.ac.uk.

6. Applications are invited for one-month Visiting Fellowships at Chawton House Library (CHL) to be taken up between October 2014 and the end of August 2015. Deadline for applications: 7 April 2014. For more information please see www.chawtonhouse.org  

7. Registration is now open for our annual workshop, which will take place on Saturday 10 May 2014.  This year’s title is ‘Uncapable of her freedom': Trading as a woman in the late 17th-Century City of London.  We are delighted to announce that our keynote speaker is Professor Laura Gowing, Professor of Early Modern British History at King’s College, London. All queries should be directed to Yvonne Noble, workshop organiser, at : yn@noblesse.demon.co.uk  www.womensstudiesgroup.org.uk

8. Announcing the Fifth Annual FEMINIST ART HISTORY CONFERENCE at American University in Washington, DC, Friday, October 31 – Sunday, November 2, 2014. CFP on subjects spanning the chronological spectrum, from the ancient world through the present, to foster a broad dialogue on feminist art-historical practice. To be considered for participation, please provide a single document in Microsoft Word. It should consist of a one-page, single-spaced proposal of unpublished work up to 500 words for a 20-minute presentation, followed by a curriculum vitae of no more than two pages. Please name the document “[last name]-proposal” and submit with the subject line “[last name]-proposal” to fahc5papers@gmail.com. Submission Deadline: May 15, 2014. Invitations to participate will be sent by July 1.

9. Sixteenth Century Studies Conference in New Orleans, Oct 16-19, 2014: “Did Early Modern Women Have a Youth?” I would love to hear from others who would like to offer papers on girls and young women as yet unmarried to God or man, on their activities, their letters and other expressions, their aspirations, their senses of constraint or autonomy, their collaboration with other family members, female and male, and whatever else you may have discovered. I myself will propose a paper on the seduction of young women as these culpable efforts turn up in the criminal courts of Rome. Please respond to Libby Cohen at: ecohen@yorku.ca with a paper title, 150-word abstract and a one-page CV.

10. We are accordingly issuing a call for editors of NeoLatin texts to be included in the DLL. If you are interested in this prospect, please contact Dr. Michael Ullyot, RSA’s representative to the DLL, at ullyot@ucalgary.ca.

11. Call for Papers: 18th Century and Romantic Studies Graduate Conference: “Bending the mind”: Attention and Instruction in the Long Eighteenth Century 26th-27th April, 2014 Faculty of English, University of Cambridge. http://www.english.cam.ac.uk/research/eighteenth/?page_id=26

12. University of Sussex and British Academy: Early Career Research Network Symposium:  Editing April 11th, 2014 at the University of Sussex. contact Simon Davies (S.F.Davies@sussex.ac.uk) for more information. http://www.sussex.ac.uk/cems/newsandevents/events?id=23367

13. Call for papers – Teaching Shakespeare in Japan. Articles are short, 500-1000, words but we welcome a range of formats: interviews, vox pops, lesson plans, reviews and storyboards. Please do get in touch with ideas (approx. 150-word abstract) or questions ator sarah.olive@york.ac.uk by April 30th, It is envisaged that accepted articles would be submitted by August 30th 2014. Past issues are freely available to read online or download athttp ://www . britishshakespeare . ws/education/teaching-shakespeare/

14. Announcing a new series from Ashgate Publishing Company, Cultures of Play, 1300-1700. Series Editor:  Bret Rothstein, Indiana University. The series publishes original research written in English, including both single author volumes and collections of original essays. Proposals should take the form of either 1) a preliminary letter of inquiry, briefly describing the project; or 2) a formal prospectus including:  abstract; brief statement of critical methodology, table of contents; sample chapter; estimate of length; estimate of the number and type of illustrations to be included; a c.v. Please email your letter or proposal to the Ashgate contact for this series: Erika Gaffney, Publishing Manager, egaffney@ashgate.com

15. We invite proposals for papers that consider any aspect of the life, writings, and activities of Cheke and the other members of the group surrounding him at Cambridge and their impact on Tudor England. Topics might include (but are not limited to): art and architecture, communities and networks, education and universities, gender and society, government and political reform, humanism and scholarship, ancient and vernacular languages, mathematics and the natural sciences, religious controversy and reform, translation and rhetoric. We especially welcome proposals from PhD students and other early career academics and expect to have bursaries available to cover some of the expenses of attending the conference. Please send proposals (250 words) by 1 May 2014 to Alan Bryson (a.bryson@sheffield.ac.uk), John McDiarmid (diarmid@starpower.net), or Fred Schurink (fred.schurink@northumbria.ac.uk).

16. Keble College, Oxford is looking for a fellow to teach and research Reformation history and theology: http://bit.ly/1fZC2uW

17. The Place of Spenser / Spenser’s Places. Dublin, 18-20 June 2015. The Fifth International Spenser Society Conference  www.spenser2015.com

18. Heythrop College is celebrating its 400th anniversary with a two-day conference at the Institute of English Studies, Senate House, University of London. The conference will reflect on the history of the College and explore the nature and character of Jesuit education over the past 400 years. For further details, full programme and registration please see For the Greater Glory of God and the More Universal Good: http://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/Heythrop400. Early registration is essential to ensure a place.

19. Call for Papers: Special Issue of Shakespeare on “Shakespeare and Jonson”. Please send expressions of interest or abstracts for papers of 6500-7000 words to james.loxley@ed.ac.uk and fionnuala.oneill@soton.ac.uk by Friday 16th May 2014.

20. The long-standing Reformation Studies Colloquium will set up its tents in Cambridge in September. It always is an exciting event, and the lineup of keynote speakers this year is fantastic: Alec Ryrie, Ben Kaplan, and Mary Laven. If you wish to participate, please see the Call for Papers on the website (http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/research/conferences/reformation-studies), or don’t hesitate to email reformationstudies@hist.cam.ac.uk with any questions. Hoping to welcome many of you in Cambridge!

21. Lecturer in Shakespeare and Renaissance Literature at UCL. If you have any enquiries regarding the vacancy or the application process, please contact the Departmental Administrator, Mr. Stephen Cadywold, s.cadywold@ucl.ac.uk. Further information about the Department is available on www.ucl.ac.uk/english.

22. Eleventh International Milton Symposium. Call for Papers. The Eleventh International Milton Symposium will be held at the University of Exeter, England, 20-24 July, 2015. Proposals for papers (500 words maximum, preferably in the form of an email attachment) should be submitted by 10 June 2014 to Karen Edwards (k.l.edwards@exeter.ac.uk) and Philip Schwyzer (p.a.schwyzer@exeter.ac.uk), English Department, Queen’s Building, 
Exeter University, Exeter EX4 4QH, UK. 

23. Editing Tudor Literature. Newcastle University, 10-11 May 2014. If you would like to attend please contact Jennifer Richards (Jennifer.Richards@ncl.ac.uk) by May 1st at the very latest.

24. Liminal Time and Space in Medieval and Early Modern Performance: Call for Papers
5th-7th September 2014, University of Kent. Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words to Dr Sarah Dustagheer (s.dustagheer-463@kent.ac.uk) and Dr Clare Wright (c.wright-468@kent.ac.uk) by Monday 14th April 2014.

25. Early Modern Studies Journal is soliciting essays for a special volume whose subject concerns women’s writing and its connection to women’s work, broadly interpreted. Essays might focus more particularly on either the writing or the work of women, or they might show the intricate ways in which writing and work are related in the female sphere of the 16th and 17th centuries. Though the journal primarily focuses on the literature and culture of England, we encourage articles concerning women’s literary and material production in other geographical contexts in the early modern period, though essays need to be written in English. You can visit our website for more information: http://www.uta.edu/english/emsjournal/.

Newsletter 44

By Alexander Samson, on 5 February 2014

Newsletter 44

1. Early Modern Exchanges Seminar Series. Wednesday 12 February 2014, 4.30pm, Foster Court 307, SELCS Common Room. Historical Geography and the Early Modern. http://www.ucl.ac.uk/eme/seminars

2. Call for Papers, March 1st, “Godly Governance: Religion and Political Culture in the Early Modern World, c. 1500-1750″, a conference at the University of York (UK), 27-28 June 2014. For more info: http://godlygov2014.wordpress.com

3. Call for Project Participants for Religion, Art and Conflict: disputes, destruction and creation, a project which consists of two events at The Courtauld Institute of Art in London: the first, a one-day workshop on Friday 20 June 2014; the second, a 1.5 day conference on Friday 5 and Saturday 6 December 2014. The deadline for the Call for Project Participants is Monday 17 March 2014. Please submit your CV with a short statement (300-500 words) summarising your research interests and reasons for wanting to join the research group to Dr Michael Carter: michael.carter@courtauld.ac.uk

http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/researchforum/index.shtml

4. CFP “Dramatizing Penshurst”. For more info: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/dramatizing-penshurst/

5. Speaking and Writing Aztec (Nahuatl). Inaugural Lecture: Speaking & Reading Aztec: http://events.sas.ac.uk/ilas/events/view/15296/Inaugural+Lecture%3A+Speaking+%26+Reading+Aztec

6. “Global City: On the Streets of Renaissance Lisbon” at the Wallace Collection from Thursday 6th November, 2014 to Sunday 15th February, 2015.
http://www.wallacecollection.org/collections/exhibition/107

7. Toledo as a Centre of Translation in the 12th &13th Centuries. UCL Translation in History Lecture Series on Thursday 6 February from 6-7.30 pm in Lecture Theatre G6, UCL Institute of Archaeology. For further details and registration, please see http://www.ucl.ac.uk/translation-studies/translation-in-history/current-series/#termtwo

8. The third annual John Rule Lecture will be held on 12 March at 6 pm in Lecture Theatre C on Avenue Campus at the University of Southampton. ‘The Curious Case of Mademoiselle de Choiseul’ by Professor Catriona Seth, professor of 18th-century studies at the Université de Lorraine and World Leading Researcher at Queen’s University (Belfast). Please RSVP to Sandy White, sw17@soton.ac.uk.

9. The Northern Renaissance Seminar in association with CREME:
http://creme.lancs.ac.uk/ ‘To set the word against the word’: new directions in early modern textual analysis’, Lancaster University, Saturday 22 February 2014,
Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences Building, Meeting Room 3. There is no registration fee. Please contact Liz Oakley-Brown e.oakley-brown@lancaster.ac.uk to register.

10. CFP at The Renaissance English Text Society for 2014 SCSC (Sixteenth Century Society Conference) to be held on 16-19 October in New Orleans, Louisiana. Please send a 150-word abstract and a one-page CV to me at maryelamb@aol.com and to Anne Lake Prescott ataprescot@barnard.edu by 10 March. E-mail attachments in Microsoft Word are preferred.

11. ‘Teresa of Avila 1515-2015 Mystical Theology and Spirituality in the Carmelite Tradition.’ For more information and call for papers see: www.smuc.ac.uk/inspire

12. AHRC Funded Doctoral Studentships in the Arts and Humanities: Department
of English and Creative Writing, University of Roehampton. For more details on the TECHNE application process, see
http://www.roehampton.ac.uk/Courses/Graduate-School/TECHNE-AHRC-Doctoral-Training-Partnership/ The deadline for applications is 19 February 2014.

13. AHRC Network: Voices and Books, 1500-1800. First workshop in Manchester. For more info: http://research.ncl.ac.uk/voicesandbooks/

14. CFP for the fourth Tudor and Stuart Ireland Conference in NUI Maynooth on 29 and 30 August 2014. The closing date for proposals is Friday, 11 April 2014. Please see our website, www.tudorstuartireland.com or contact the organisers at 2014@tudorstuartireland.com for further information.

15. Shakespeare 450 Conference. Paris, April 21-27, 2014. Fore more info: http://www.shakespeareanniversary.org/shake450/fr/

16. Sub-Faculty of Spanish, University of Oxford, Research Seminars, Hilary Term 2014. All seminars, unless otherwise indicated, will take place at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in Room 3, Taylor Institution. https://weblearn.ox.ac.uk/access/content/group/26e38a26-f27e-4c07-a0ac-7a8aec607d1c/seminars/spanish/spanish-seminars-ht14.pdf

17. CFP The Roots of Nationalism: National Identity Formation in Early Modern Europe, 1600-1815. Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands
22-23 January 2015. Paper proposals (max 300 words) should reach the conference committee by 1 April 2014 by email: nations@let.ru.nl. The committee invites panels
or proposals on any topic relevant to this conference’s theme: the forging of national identities in early modern Europe between 1600 and 1815. Conference website: http://www.ru.nl/rootsofnationalism

18. Centre for Early Modern and Medieval Studies at the University of Sussex
(CEMMS) Spring Semester: All Tuesday evening papers start at 6pm in the English Social Space (B274). For more info: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/cems/newsandevents/events or email Prof Margaret Healy (m.j.healy@sussex.ac.uk)

19. Harvard University research seminar organized as part of the Getty Foundation’s Connecting Art Histories initiative: “From Riverbed to Seashore: Art on the Move in Eastern Europe and the Mediterranean in the Early Modern Period (2014-2015)”, will be led by Professor Alina Payne of Harvard University. The application deadline has been extended to March 1. Please send applications to the attention of Elizabeth Kassler-Taub, Department of History of Art and Architecture, Harvard University, ekassler@fas.harvard.edu. For any queries, contact  Elizabeth Kassler-Taub or Professor Alina Payne (aapayne@fas.harvard.edu).

20.  ‘Illustration and Identification in the History of Herbal Medicine’ 10.30 am–4.30 pm, Wednesday 18th June 2014, Jodrell Lecture Theatre, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 3DS, UK. Advance registration required: Contact nicky@nickywesson.com For further information, see http://events.history.ac.uk/event/show/12436

21. “For the Greater Glory of God and the More Universal Good”: A Celebration of the 400th Anniversary of the Foundation of  Heythrop College and of the Jesuit Educational Tradition’, Institute of English Studies, Senate House, University of London, 19 – 20 June 2014. For further information, programme and registration, visit http://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/Heythrop400

22. Sheffield Centre for Early Modern Studies. To book a place on the masterclasses, please contact the SCEMS research fellow, g.schwartzleeper@shef.ac.uk

23. CFP ‘Adapting, Performing and Reviewing Shakespearean Comedy in a European Context.’ Interdisciplinary Symposium at the Institute of Modern Languages Research (IMLR), London, Thursday 12 and Friday 13 June 2014. Please send 200-word abstracts with a 50-word biography by 15th February 2014 to the following address: shakespeare.comedy.2014@gmail.com

24. Preliminary Announcement and Call for Papers: The Fifteenth Century Conference, University of Aberdeen,4th, 5th, 6th September 2014. Those wishing to offer papers are invited to send details by e-mail to j.armstrong@abdn.ac.uk or to Dr Jackson Armstrong, History, Crombie Annexe, Meston Walk, University of Aberdeen, Old Aberdeen, AB24 3FX. Please send: Title of proposed paper; Abstract (c. 200 words); Full name and professional title (viz. Professor, Dr, Ms, & c.); Postal address and e-mail; Institutional affiliation and relevant status (viz. permanent / fellowship / research student / & c.); Anticipated availability (e.g. if only one day is feasible). Closing date 1 March 2014.

25. CFP ‘Error and Print Culture, 1500-1800’: A one-day conference at the Centre for the Study of the Book, Oxford University, Saturday 5 July 2014. Proposals for 20-minute papers are welcome on any aspect of error and print, in Anglophone or non-Anglophone cultures. Please email a 300-word abstract and a short CV to Dr Adam Smyth (adam.smyth@balliol.ox.ac.uk) by 14 April 2014.

26. CFP “Themes of Polemical Theology Across Early Modern Literary Genres.” For more info: http://polemicaltheology.wix.com//themes-across

Newsletter 43

By Alexander Samson, on 22 November 2013

1. Wednesday, 20 November: Professor Michele Bacci (University of Fribourg), The Invention of a Holy Site: the Lateran Church in the Middle Ages, 5.30pm, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre. Admission: Free and open to all. Organised in association with the Centre for Hellenic Studies at King’s College London.

Thursday, 21 November, Art History and Sound Lecture Series: Deborah Howard (University of Cambridge), Architecture and Music in Renaissance Venice, 6.00pm, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre.

http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/researchforum/calendar.shtml

 

2. Women’s Study GroupSeminar

Senate House, Malet Street, University of London on Saturday 30 November at 2.00pm. Room 234, second floor.

www.womensstudiesgroup.org.uk

The seminar is open to all. The format is informal and friendly, with lively debate and an opportunity to network with others.

 

3. The seventh annual student conference of the Birkbeck Early Modern Society will be held on Saturday 15 February, with the theme of ‘Vice and Virtue in any aspect of life in the Early Modern Period ( 1500-1800)’.

Call for papers deadline is 6 December. For more info: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/history/current-students/societies-student-groups/early-modern-society

 

4. Call for papers: Colloquium on Dialects in Italian Literature and Culture, 1500-1800. Dartmouth Colle (Hanover, NH), September 4-6, 2014. Please submit an abstract of 300 words, a short bio, and your contact information (name, affiliation, and email address) to Nancy Canepa Nancy.L.Canepa@Dartmouth.edu and Courtney Quaintance Courtney.Quaintance@Dartmouth.edu by March 1, 2014.

 

5. The London Renaissance Seminar. Please join us for an informal discussion of religion on the early modern stage. Dr. Alison Shell and Dr. Emma Smith will lead discussion starting from Shakespeare’s Unreformed Fictions/(OUP, 2013) by Dr. Gillian Woods Friday 29th November 2013 6 -7.30pm, Birkbeck,43 Gordon Square Birkbeck College, University of London. Contact s.wiseman@bbk.ac.uk

 

6. CFP for Writing Britain: 500-1500. University of Cambridge, Faculty of English, 30 June – 2 July 2014. Please visit our conference web site in order to submit an abstract (300 words or fewer) for a twenty-minute paper. Please send your abstract by 20 February 2014. Abstracts from postgraduate students are welcome and graduate rates will be provided. For further information please visit the website

http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/english/news/conferences/writing_britain

 

7. Tuesday 19th November 2013, Gordon Room (G34), Ground Floor, Senate House, University of London, 5:15pm: Reclothing the churches:  sensory religious re-investment in the early modern English parish church, Jude Jones (Southampton)

http://www.victoriacountyhistory.ac.uk/learning/seminar

 

8. The archives of the Irish College in Paris are in the process of being digitised, and some very interesting documents are already available:

http://primary-sources.eui.eu/website/collection-irish-college-paris

 

9. The Irish Jesuit Archives is now online: http://www.jesuitarchives.ie/

 

10. Deadline for the first Renaissance Society of America and Text Creation Partnership (TCP) Article Prize in Digital Renaissance Research awards http://www.rsa.org/?page=Awards

 

11. GEMELA invites abstracts for its biennial conference in Lisbon, Portugal, September 8-10, 2014. http://www.gemela.org

 

12. Antiquity in a World of Change: Celebrating the 500th Anniversary of the Birth of Sir Thomas Smith (1513-77). To book, please email Executive Assistant Jola Zdunek (admin@sal.org.uk) or call 020 7479 7080. Please contact the Communications Officer Renée LaDue (rladue@sal.org.uk) if you have any questions.

 

13. Call for papers: Defending the Faith Conference taking place 15-17 September, 2014. It is being held in celebration of the 450th anniversary of the English translation of John Jewel’s Apology of the Church of England. Abstracts of 500 words by 1st March, 2014 to Angela Ranson ransoang@gmail.com or Sarah Bastow s.l.bastow@hud.ac.uk

 

14. CREMS study day in the liturgy in history. Please see the following for details of this exciting event: http://liturgyinhistory.wordpress.com/

 

15. Early Modern Jarman 2014 event: 1 February 2014, Anatomy Theatre & Museum, King’s College London. Call for papers http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/shakespeare_bulletin/calls.html

 

16. Dürer and Warburg: Interpreting Antiquity. A two-day conference which will take place at The Warburg Institute (Friday 22 November) and The Courtauld Institute of Art (Saturday 23 November.)

Book online: http://ci.tesseras.com/internet/shop

Further information: http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/researchforum/events/2013/autumn/nov22-23_DurerandWarburgInterpretingAntiquity.shtml

 

17. Please find below details of Renaissance Art History seminars, lectures and related events taking place in London in November.

Book online: http://ci.tesseras.com/internet/shop

 

18. Saint Louis University, a Catholic, Jesuit institution dedicated to student learning, research, health care, and service is seeking applicants for a full time tenure-track position at the level of assistant or associate professor to begin Fall 2014 in Early Modern European History. All applications must be made online at http://jobs.slu.edu and should include a cover letter and curriculum vitae.

 

19. Call for papers for the 2014 ACLA Annual Meeting on “Capitals” hosted by NYU in New York City, March 20-23rd.  The deadline for submission of papers is November 15th (midnight, Pacific Standard Time). To submit a paper visit the ACLA website here: http://acla.org/acla2014/propose-a-paper/

 

20. Thomas Browne Seminar, 2014 ‘Classical Philosophers in 17th century English Thought’ – Call for papers, Wed 28th May 2014. Abstracts by 15th December (c. 250 words) to: Kevin Killeen, kevin.killeen@york.ac.uk

This symposium is part of a diffuse and ongoing Thomas Browne Seminar that has digressed quite far:  http://www.york.ac.uk/english/news-events/browne/

 

21. ‘Time and Early Modern Thought’ – Call for papers. Sat 10th May 2014 – York Minster Old Palace Library. Please send abstracts (c. 250 words) by Dec 15th to Kevin Killeen kevin.killeen@york.ac.uk and Liz Oakley-Brown e.oakley-brown@lancaster.ac.uk

 

22. Heather Dalton (University of Melbourne), ‘A Sulphur-crested Cockatoo in fifteenth-century Mantua: Rethinking symbols of sanctity and patterns of trade’

5.15pm on Tuesday 12 November in the Roy Griffiths Room, Keble College, Oxford. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/rest.12042/abstract

 

23. Northern Renaissance Roses Seminar, 2014 ‘Time and Early Modern Thought’ Call for papers. Sat 10th May 2014 – York Minster Old Palace Library

Please send abstracts (c. 250 words) by Dec 15th to Kevin Killeen kevin.killeen@york.ac.uk and Liz Oakley-Brown e.oakley-brown@lancaster.ac.uk http://www.york.ac.uk/crems/

 

24. New collection of essays about the influence of ladies-in-waiting within early modern European courts: http://www.brill.com/products/book/politics-femalehouseholds

 

25. 16 November 2013: HERA-funded collaborative research project “Encounters with the Orient in Early Modern European Scholarship” with a one-day symposium on The Teaching and Learning of Arabic in Early Modern Europe. The symposium will take place at the Leemanszaal, Rijksmuseum van Oudheden, Leiden.

Speakers are Asaph Ben-Tov (Erfurt), Alexander Bevilacqua (Princeton), Mordechai Feingold (Caltech), Mercedes García-Arenal (Madrid), Aurélien Girard (Reims) and Arnoud Vrolijk (Leiden). Please find the detailed programme here: http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/fileadmin/images/events/colloquia/2013-14/Learning_and_Teaching_of_Arabic_Leiden__2_.pdf

 

26. 2014 BSA Fellowship Program Announcement Application Deadline: December 15, 2013 http://bibsocamer.org/fellows.htm

 

27. THE EDITION AS ARGUMENT, 1550-1750. 16-17 July 2014, Queen Mary, University of London. Call for Papers Abstracts should be no more than 300 words long and should be sent to Harriet Phillips h.phillips@qmul.ac.uk and Claire Bryony Williams c.b.williams@qmul.ac.uk by 1st December 2013.

 

29. Registration is now open for The Blood Conference, an interdisciplinary forum to discuss early modern and medieval theories of blood. Wednesday 8th to Friday 10th January 2014, St Anne’s College, Oxford. Find out more and book in for the conference: www.thebloodproject.net Join the conversation on Twitter: @bloodproject

 

30. Call for Papers: ‘Early Modern Soundscapes’, Thursday 24th – Friday 25th April 2014, Bangor University. To include the Society for Renaissance Studies Annual Welsh Lecture, given by Professor Jennifer Richards (Newcastle University) and Professor Richard Wistreich (Royal Northern College of Music). Abstracts of no more than 250 words for twenty-minute papers, or proposals for panels comprising three papers, are to be sent to Rachel Willie (r.willie@bangor.ac.uk) by December 1, 2013.

 

31. Second Annual Postgraduate Renaissance Symposium; call for papers – deadline 4 November 2013. Event to take place: Saturday 18 January 2014, The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN. Please send proposals of no more than 250 words and your academic CV by 4 November 2013 to renaissanceartandmusic@gmail.com

 

32. CFP for conference on perceptions of pregnancy from medieval to modern times at the University of Hertfordshire, UK, next July. http://perceptionsofpregnancy.wordpress.com/

 

33. November 21, 2013 Wolfgang Adam, Universitat Osnabruck, Faire reviver Montaigne. Contact Concetta Cavallini : concetta.cavallini@uniba.it and Giovanna Devincenzo: giovanna.devincenzo@uniba.it

34. Call for Papers: Drama and Pedagogy. Swiss Association of Medieval and Early Modern English Studies 2014 Conference, 12-13 September, 2014, University of Fribourg, Switzerland.

For further details, please see our website: http://samemes2014.wordpress.com/

For further information on the Swiss Association of Medieval and Early Modern English Studies, please visit http://www.unil.ch/samemes

 

35. Migration and Mission in Christian History (3-5 April, Oxford), deadlines 21 October 2013 and 20 January: http://www.history.ac.uk/ehsoc/content/migration-and-mission-christian-history-joint-asch-ehs-conference

 

Reading, Writing and Religion 1660-1830 (7 December, Queen Mary, London), deadline 25 October: http://writingandreligion.wordpress.com/

 

Religions of the Book (17-21 September, Antwerp), deadline 30 November: http://dighum.ua.ac.be/ocs/index.php/sharp/sharp2014/schedConf/cfp

 

Collegial Communities in Exile (19-20 June, Limerick), deadline 17 January:  http://colleges2014.wordpress.com/

 

Gender and Sexuality in the Reformation (9-11 April Westminster College, Cambridge), deadline 31 January: http://reformationstudies.org/2013/09/10/gender-and-sexuality-in-the-reformation/

 

Reassessing Women’s Travel Writing, 1660-1900 (10-12 July, Chawton House Library, Hampshire), deadline 1 March: http://www.chawtonhouse.org/?p=57800

 

Godly Governance: Religion and Political Culture in the Early Modern World (27-28 June, York), deadline 1 March: http://godlygov2014.wordpress.com/

 

36. Call for Papers: Godly Governance: Religion and Political Culture in the Early Modern World, c. 1500-1750. University of York (UK), 27th-28th June 2014.

Please send abstracts and panel proposals to Christine Knaack, Jonas van Tol and Emma Kennedy by 1 March 2014 at godlygov2014@gmail.com.

 

For more information, please visit http://godlygov2014.wordpress.com/.

 

37. Speaking with the Dead: Histories of Memory in Sacred Space. 1-2 November at Exeter Cathedral and the Devon and Exeter Institution. Please contact Professor Philip Schwyzer (p.a.schwyzer@ex.ac.uk) by Friday 25 October to register for the symposium. Those wishing to attend the public lecture by Professor Douglas Davies only should contact Sarah Grainger (sarah.grainger@exeter-cathedral.org.uk).

‘The Many Faces of a Mediaeval Fenland Church’, a study day to be held at St Clement’s Church, Outwell, on 26th April 2014. Places are limited and early booking is encouraged. http://www.mbs-brasses.co.uk/Outwell_Study_Day_-_26_April_2014.pdf

 

38. Open University Book History Research Group seminars (nine Monday evenings from November to May) at Senate House, London. The topic is Paper, Pen and Ink: Manuscript Cultures in Early Modern England and the full programme is at http://www.open.ac.uk/Arts/english/book-history/paper-pen-ink.shtml

For further information, please contact the organiser, Jonathan Gibson (jonathan.gibson@open.ac.uk).

 

39. 26 November, 2013, Ruth Ahnert, ‘Social Networking – Tudor Style’, Senate House, 5pm: http://blogs.history.qmul.ac.uk/digitalhumanities/

 

40. A Conference on Early Modern Identity at Homerton College, University of Cambridge, Saturday 23rd November, 10.30 – 17:00 http://www.homerton.cam.ac.uk/events/women_and_war

 

41. The First Annual Bardies Awards. bardies@theshakespearestandard.com

For more info: http://www.theshakespearestandard.com/?s=global+shakespeare

Newsletter 42

By Alexander Samson, on 15 October 2013

 

  1. Lecture series on Shakespeare and the Classical Tradition by Professor Jonathan Bate FBA CBE, Provost of Worcester College, Oxford,  to be held at the Warburg Institute.
  2. 400 anniversary Heythrop  College Conference to be held at Senate House in June 2014. Jesuit Educational Tradition, 19 – 20th June, 2014. CFP and further details click on link.
  3. Call for Papers – Rites and Rituals. Papers must be between 3,000 – 5,000 words in length, formatted according to MLA guidelines. Please email your paper, a short abstract and your academic CV in separate, clearly labelled DOC(X). files to editors@forumjournal.org by Monday 16th September 2013. All eligible articles will be peer reviewed prior to publication. Only one submission per author per issue is permissible. FORUM journal is a postgraduate journal for arts and culture based at the University of Edinburgh. For more information and style guidelines, visit www.forumjournal.org
  4. CFP Warwick University. ‘Laughter & Satire in Europe 1500-1800’ is an interdisciplinary conference to be held 26-27th May 2014 in Venice. The deadline for submitting paper proposals (up to 300 words) is 13th January 2014. Proposals should be submitted to Adam.Morton@warwick.ac.uk.
  5. Call for Papers for a conference on ‘Early Modern Women, Religion and the Body’ at Loughborough University on 22-23 July 2014. 300 word abstracts to Rachel Adcock, Sara Read and Anna Ziomek at emwomen@lboro.ac.uk by 31st January 2014.
  6. Call for Papers: early modern soundscapes Early Modern Soundscapes Thursday 24th – Friday 25th April 2014 Bangor University. We welcome abstracts of not more than 250 words for twenty-minute papers, or proposals for panels comprising three papers, to be sent to Rachel Willie (r.willie@bangor.ac.uk) by December 1st 2013.
  7. Call for Articles for Journal of Northern Renaissance: Numbers in Early Modern Writing. Submission deadline: 1 December 2013  Estimated date of publication: September 2014. This issue will be guest-edited by Dr Katherine Hunt and Rebecca Tomlin. Enquiries regarding possible contributions can be sent to northernrenaissance+numbers@gmail.com.
  8. Low Countries History Seminars, IHR, 2013 – 14.
  9. Essex: The cultural impact of an Elizabethan courtier. One-Day Symposium Saturday 26th October, 12-4.30pm Sheffield Hallam University, Room 9003, Cantor Building, City Campus. There is no registration fee and refreshments will be provided, but we do require you to e-mail us in advance to book a place: A.F.Connolly@shu.ac.uk

  10. 12th ESSE Conference in Kosice, Slovakia, Friday 29 August – Tuesday 2 September, 2014. Seminar on English manuscript studies. Please send your proposals to: Carlo Bajetta (Università della Valle d’Aosta, Italy) carlo.bajetta@univda.it and Guillaume Coatalen (Université de Cergy-Pontoise, France) guillaumecoatalen@hotmail.com.
  11. The Women’s Studies Group 1558-1837 seminar series for the 2013-14 at www.womenstudiesgroup.org.uk
  12. Early Modern Rome 2″ in celebration of the 10th anniversary of the UCEAP “Rome Through the Ages” program, will be held from October 10-12, 2013, full details: conference.eapitaly.it
  13. The London Renaissance Seminar will meet on Saturday 19th October to discuss: Creating Early Modern Memory. 1-5pm, 43 Gordon Square, School of Arts, Birkbeck. All welcome, no registration necessary.
  14. Emma Dillon – Remembering to Forget: Music, Conversion, and the Early Cistercian Experience Tuesday 1st October 2013 5pm, ArtsTwo Room 3.16, Queen Mary, University of London. Centre for Renaissance and Early Modern Studies. Attendance is free; all welcome.
  15. Horace in Renaissance France: Poetry and Scholarship The Warburg Institute, November 29th 2013 (organizers: Daniel Andersson, Ariane Schwartz)
  16. UCL’s Interdisciplinary Medieval and Renaissance Seminars http://www.ucl.ac.uk/mars/seminars-lectures/imars_13_14
  17. Coming soon to The Courtauld Gallery  The Young Dürer: Drawing the Figure  17 October 2013 – 12 January 2014
  18. Reading Conference in Early Modern Studies, 7-9 July 2014: call for papers. Proposals for either papers or panels should be sent by email to the chair of the Conference Committee, Dr. Rebecca Bullard, by 6 January 2014, r.bullard@reading.ac.uk
  19. Text and Book in the Age of Swift. A day conference on 23 November 2013, St Peter’s College Oxford.
  20. Call for Papers for the Second Annual Postgraduate Renaissance Symposium: The Visual Arts and Music in Renaissance Europe c.1400 – 1650, which will take place at The Courtauld on Saturday 18 January 2014 Please send proposals of no more than 250 words and your academic CV by 4 November 2013 to renaissanceartandmusic@gmail.com
  21. Warburg Institute complete Annual Programme available at: http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/fileadmin/images/events/AnnualProgramme2013_14.pdf
  22. Two Calleva Centre three-year Postdoctoral Research Associates developing experimental and text-based research on the psychology of the audience, with particular reference to classical Greek and early modern English drama, Magdalen College (University of Oxford). Application forms and further particulars, which include information on how to apply, are available at www.magd.ox.ac.uk/vacancies/ . The deadline for applications is UK time 12 noon on 1 November 2013.
  23. CFP. British Branch of the International Courtly Literature Society (ICLS) University of Exeter, Monday 14th and Tuesday 15th April, 2014. Proposals for papers of 25 minutes in length in any area of the Society’s interests are invited from the membership. Please send these to Dr Emma Cayley by email (e.j.cayley@exeter.ac.uk) or hard copy by 15th December 2013.

  24. History of Pre-Modern Medicine seminar series returns this autumn.  The 2013-14 series is organised by a group of historians of medicine based at London universities and hosted by the Wellcome Library.
  25. The Gothic Ivories team is delighted to announce that 700 ‘new’ ivory carvings from over 60 different collections are now available online as part of the Gothic Ivories website! (www.gothicivories.courtauld.ac.uk)
  26. INSTITUTE OF HISTORICAL RESEARCH Society, Culture and Belief, 1500-1800, Seminar Series 2013 – 14.

  27. Call for book proposals: Literary & Scientific Cultures of Early Modernity, details here: http://www.ashgate.com/LITSCI. To submit a proposal, or for more information, please contact: Erika Gaffney, Publishing Manager,egaffney@ashgate.com.
  28. Centre for Editing Lives and Letters Director’s Seminar schedule: http://www.livesandletters.ac.uk/?q=content/directors-seminar
  29. Hugh Trevor-Roper Centenary Conference 11 January 2014: Update.
  30. Collegial Communities in Exile Conference: New histories of the Irish, English, Scots, Dutch and other colleges founded on the continent in the early modern period. Mary Immaculate College, University of Limerick, Ireland ― 19-20 June 2014. For more information: http://colleges2014.wordpress.com/
  31. One day colloquium being hosted at Queen Mary, University of London on Saturday 7 December, 2013: ‘Reading, Writing and Religion, 1660-1830′. See colloquium website for further details: http://writingandreligion.wordpress.com/
  32. Lewis as Critic, 23rd November, 2013, Cripps Court, Magdalene College, Cambridge. In this one-day conference we will discuss the significance of C.S. Lewis’ contribution to the practice of criticism and commemorate the 50th anniversary of his death. For more information, and to register, please visit: lewisascritic.wordpress.com
  33. Please find attached and at this link details of the fifth Early Modern Symposium at the Courtauld Institute of Art on Saturday 26 October.http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/researchforum/events/2013/autumn/oct26_FifthEarlyModernSymposium.shtml
  34. Classical Philosophers in Seventeenth Century English Thought 28 May 2014, CREMS, University of York. A day symposium – abstracts by 15th December (c. 250 words). Contact: Kevin Killeen, kevin.killeen@york.ac.uk
  35. Tradescant Lecture with Karen Hearn and Jennifer Potter, 17th October 2013, Garden Museum.
  36. The Keith Walker Memorial Lecture 2013 will take place at 6.30pm on Thursday 14th November, in the Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre, UCL, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT. Professor Sir Brian Vickers (Honorary Research Professor of UCL English) will speak on “The One King Lear“.
  37. Courtauld Institute of Art 2013 autumn term programmeAll seminars are free /open to all and taking place at Somerset House, Strand, WC2R 0RN London.
  38. NEW Cultures of Knowledge Lunchtime Seminar Series: Negotiating Networks. Theme: early modern letters, networks and the digital humanities. Thursdays 1pm, 31st Oct – 5th Dec: Conference Room, Oxford e-Research Centre, Keble Road http://www.culturesofknowledge.org/?page_id=1270
  39. ‘Renaissance Loves’, London Renaissance Seminar, 9 November, 2.00pm-6.00pm, Room 124, Birkbeck College, 43 Gordon Square, London WC1.
  40. CFP. “REVISITING EARLY MODERN PROPHECIES (c.1500-c.1815)” 26–28 June, 2014  Goldsmiths, London. Proposals for 20-minute papers in English (maximum 300 words) with a short bio are invited, and should be sent by 31 October 2013 to either of the conference organisers: Dr Ariel Hessayon  a.hessayon(@gold.ac.uk) or Dr Lionel Laborie  l.laborie(@gold.ac.uk)
  41. Society for Neo-Latin Studies: Annual Lecture November 8th 5 p.m. King’s College London, Classics Department, Room B6. emeritus professor Roger p.h. Green (University of Glasgow), The Poetry of George Buchanan  1973-2023.

  42. *British Milton Seminar, 19 October 2013: Programme*. Venue: In the Birmingham and Midland Institute [**PLEASE NOTE**]. There will be two sessions, from 11.00 am to 12.30 pm and from 2.00 pm to 4.00 pm. You can follow the British Milton Seminar at: http://britishmiltonseminar
  43. The first SOAS Research Seminar in Islamic Art of this year takes place on Thursday 24th October, at 5.30 in B111 (as usual). I am pleased to welcome Dr Martínez-de-Castilla-Muñoz, visiting fellow from the University Complutense of Madrid. Looking forward to seeing you there. SIXTEENTH CENTURY BINDINGS IN THE WESTERN ISLAMIC WORLD.
  44. ‘Death in Scotland, from the medieval to the modern: beliefs, attitudes and practices’ (CFP, Conference, Edinburgh, 31 Jan–2 Feb 2014)
  45. Free study days being held sponsored by the Who Were the Nuns? Project: This Saturday (19th October) in Brentwood, Essex then Saturday 2 November a second event will be held in central Manchester.
  46. Seminar Series 2013-14: Travel: Bodies and Objects in Motion. Seminars will take place at Royal Holloway, 11 Bedford Square, on Wednesdays at 5pm.

 

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1.

Princeton University Press and The Warburg Institute, School of Advanced Study, University of London
E. H. GOMBRICH LECTURES ON THE CLASSICAL TRADITION 2013

ANCIENT STRENGTH
Professor Jonathan Bate FBA CBE, Provost of Worcester College, Oxford

The E. H. Gombrich Lectures is an annual series of Lectures on Aspects of the Classical Tradition, named in honour of Professor Sir Ernst Gombrich FBA OM, former Director of the Warburg Institute and Professor of the History of the Classical Tradition, University of London. The Lectures will be held at the Warburg Institute and will be published by Princeton University Press.

The inaugural series of lectures on Shakespeare and the Classical Tradition will be given by Professor Jonathan Bate, FBA CBE, Editor of Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus, co-editor of The Complete Works, The RSC Shakespeare, author of Shakespeare and OvidThe Genius of ShakespeareSoul of the Age (and many other books) and co-organiser of the 2012 British Museum Exhibition, Shakespeare: Staging the World.

Thursday 10 October 2013, 5pm – Tragical Comical Historical Pastoral: Shakespeare and Classical Genre

Thursday 17 October 2013, 5pm – The Madness of Hercules: Shakespeare and Classical Psychology

Thursday 24 October 2013, 5pm – ‘I will read politic authors': Shakespeare and Classical Political Thought

Each Lecture will be followed by a Reception.

Attendance is free of charge and pre-registration is not required.

 

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2.

A Celebration of the 400th Anniversary of the Foundation of Heythrop College and of the Jesuit Educational Tradition

19 – 20 June 2014

‘For the Greater Glory of God and the More Universal Good’: A Celebration of the 400th Anniversary of the Foundation of  Heythrop College and of the Jesuit Educational Tradition

Institute of English Studies, Senate House, University of London

CALL FOR PAPERS

During the academic year 2013-2014, Heythrop College will celebrate the 400th anniversary of its foundation by the English Jesuits in Louvain in 1614.  To commemorate this notable anniversary, Heythrop College and the Institute of English Studies of the University of London are organising a conference which will explore the character and significance of the Jesuit educational tradition, with respect both to the study of theology and philosophy and to science, letters and the arts.

Abstracts of no more than 350 words should be submitted by Friday 15 November 2013. Acceptances will be sent out by Friday 29 November 2013.

Please email abstracts and a cover sheet including your name, university, contact information, plus a brief biographical paragraph about your academic interests to  Dr Thomas M. McCoog  (tmmccoog@gmail.com)  and Dr Francesca Bugliani Knox (f.knox@heythrop.ac.uk).

 

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3.

FORUM Journal: Issue 17

Call for Papers – Rites and Rituals

Rituals exist as a result of the actions of specific people or institutions; we recognise those rituals because they are engrained in our cultural customs as much as they are ordained by law. The resulting rituals not only reinforce the beliefs or values of these specific communities, but simultaneously define these group identities. Victor Turner describes  rituals  as  ‘social  dramas’  that allow  any  given culture to maintain a balance between structurally enforced norms and personal autonomy; the medieval carnival with its Lord of Misrule, for example, permitted a short period of topsy-turvy, upside-down role-play in popular culture, to ensure social hierarchies and authority were obeyed and enforced during the rest of the year.

Mary Ann McGrath states that there are four basic factors that form the ritual arena: the ritual artefacts (costumes, food, or decorations), the ritual script (written or oral), the ritual norm (a model or an example), and the ritual meaning (the reason or importance). However, where one or more of these basic factors are missing, questions arise as to the efficacy and stability of the ritual, leading to the subversion of the old ritual and invention of the new. This has led Stanley J. Tambiah and Richard Schechner –amongst others – to consider the performativity of rituals; the circumstances of the creation of ritual, the intent of the ritual performers, and the behaviour of the ritual witnesses. As the melancholy Jacques  declares,  “All  the  world’s  a  stage/  And  all  the  men  and  women  merely  players;/   They  have  their  exits  and  their  entrances;/  And  one  man  in  his  time  plays  many  parts”  (AYLI  2:7).

We are seeking submissions from a range of disciplines relating to the arts, culture or social sciences that consider the topic of RITES & RITUALS for issue 17 of FORUM. Submissions may relate to, but are not limited to:

– literary and film representations of rituals
– performance and performativity of rituals
– subversive ritual in cultural and aesthetic theory
– national vs. parochial identity and rituals
– construction and innovation of new ritual forms
– primitive vs. modern ritual
– ethics of ritual destruction or enforcement
– the sacred and secular ritual divide
– ritual and gender

Papers must be between 3,000 – 5,000 words in length, formatted according to MLA guidelines. Please email your paper, a short abstract and your academic CV in separate, clearly labelled DOC(X). files to editors@forumjournal.org by Monday 16th September 2013. All eligible articles will be peer reviewed prior to publication. Only one submission per author per issue is permissible.

FORUM journal is a postgraduate journal for arts and culture based at the University of Edinburgh. For more information and style guidelines, visit www.forumjournal.org.

 Victoria Anker and Laura Chapot, Co-Editors
Forum: Postgraduate Journal of Culture & the Arts
The University of Edinburghhttp://www.forumjournal.org/

The current issue of Forum on ‘Un/Natural Histories’ is available on our website now!

 

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4.

CFP ‘Laughter & Satire in Europe 1500-1800’ is an interdisciplinary conference to be held 26-27th May 2014. The conference is being organized by the Department of History at the University of Warwick (by Dr. Adam Morton and Prof. Mark Knights) and will take place in Venice at the Palazzo Persaro-Papafava:

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/international/world/venice/

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/emforum/events/laughterconference

The deadline for submitting paper proposals (up to 300 words) is 13th January 2014. Proposals should be submitted to Adam.Morton@warwick.ac.uk.

 

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5.

Call for Papers for a conference on ‘Early Modern Women, Religion and the Body’ at Loughborough University on 22-23 July 2014.

300 word abstracts to Rachel Adcock, Sara Read and Anna Ziomek at emwomen@lboro.ac.uk by 31st January 2014.

 

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 6.

Call for Papers: early modern soundscapes

Early Modern Soundscapes

Thursday 24th – Friday 25th April 2014

Bangor University

To include the Society for Renaissance Studies Annual Welsh Lecture, given by Professor Jennifer Richards (Newcastle University) and Professor Richard Wistreich (Royal Northern College of Music)

The Difficulty of that language is not to bee conceived, and the reasons thereof are especially two:

First, because it hath no affinitie with any other that ever I heard.

Secondly, because it consisteth not so much of words and Letters, as of tunes and uncouth sounds, that no letters can expresse.

For you have few words, but they signifie divers and severall things, and they are distinguished onely by their tunes that are as it were sung in the utterance of them, yet many words there are consisteth of tunes onely, so as if they like they will utter their mindes by tunes without wordes

Francis Godwin, The Man in the Moone (1638)

Early modern culture was awash with sounds.  From psalm singing to tavern songs to the reading of the riot act or town criers announcing noteworthy news, we are presented with an image of oral culture forming the basis of perpetual interaction between individuals and their communities.  Music, in particular, forms a backdrop to the soundscape, negotiating abstract sounds and speech.  This two-day symposium will interrogate ways of conceiving the early modern soundscape.   Topics might include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Sounds and space
  • Sounds sacred
  • Sounds profane
  • Civic noise
  • Imagined soundscapes
  • Interaction between sound and speech communities
  • Oral and literate cultures
  • Music and performance culture
  • Sounds and medicine
  • Sounds and the senses
  • The relationship between words and music

We welcome abstracts of not more than 250 words for twenty-minute papers, or proposals for panels comprising three papers, to be sent to Rachel Willie (r.willie@bangor.ac.uk) by December 1st 2013.

 

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 7.

Call for Papers: Numbers in Early Modern Writing

Submission deadline: 1 December 2013  Estimated date of publication: September 2014

Early modern books are full of numbers, representing both practicality and mystery. The Journal of the Northern Renaissanceinvites contributions for a special issue exploring numbers in early modern literature and textual culture. How were numbers and numerical techniques used in drama, dance, and music? What were the practical issues arising from printing numerical texts, and how were numbers represented on the page? How were the index and the cross-reference created and used? To what extent would an early modern audience recognize mathematical references in literary texts and performance? Who would buy an arithmetic book and how might they use it? Articles are invited on, but not confined to, the following subject areas:

–     Ways of counting and things to count: inventories and accounts; time and tempo; feet and metre.

–       Numbers in print: reference tables, logarithms, cross-referencing, indices.

–       Books on arithmetic, double-entry book-keeping and merchants’ handbooks.

–       Ciphering and deciphering.

–       The use of zero and other mathematical symbols in literature and drama.

–       Dance, music and other numerical art forms.

–       Making a reckoning: performing numbers on stage.

–       Numbers in the material text: ways of using numerical books, and their owners.

–       Mystical numbers, kaballah, numerology.

–       Mathematical methodologies; measuring, mapping and quantifying.

This issue will be guest-edited by Dr Katherine Hunt and Rebecca Tomlin, organisers of a conference on the topic held at Birkbeck, University of London, in May 2013, from which some of the papers are expected to be taken. Potential contributors are advised to consult the JNR web page for details of the submissions procedure and style guidelines:http://www.northernrenaissance.org/information. We also welcome initial enquiries regarding possible contributions, which can be sent to northernrenaissance+numbers@gmail.com.

 

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 8.

Seminar on Low Countries History, 2013-14 session

Convenors: Anne Goldgar (King’s College London), Ben Kaplan (UCL), Ulrich Tiedau (UCL)

Meetings: Fridays at 5:15 pm.  PLEASE NOTE: due to refurbishment work at the IHR, seminars this year meet in alternative locations – see schedule – and 15 mins later than previously.  SH Athlone = the University of London’s Senate House on Malet Street, Athlone Room, located in the South Block on the 1st floor, room 102.  SH Bedford = Senate House, Bedford Room, South Block on the ground floor, room G37.  STB 9 = Stewart House, adjacent to Senate House, at 32 Russell Square, room 9 in the basement.

Autumn Term

October 18        Timon Screech (SOAS), ‘The Dutch, the English and the Northeast

SH Athlone        Passage to Japan, 1600-1615′  (co-sponsored with Japan400)

Nov 1                 Hugh Dunthorne (Swansea), `The Revolt of the Netherlands and its

SH Athlone        impact on early modern Britain’

Nov 15               Joris van Eijnatten (Utrecht), `Willem Bilderdijk, Lord of Teisterbant:

STB 9                Metaphysics, Religion and Politics in the Age of Revolutions’

Nov 29               Guido van Meersbergen (UCL), `Diplomatic Encounters between East

SH Athlone        and West: Dutch Envoys at the Mughal Court (1648-1713)’

Spring Term

Jan 24                 Jesse Spohnholz (Washington State), `Seeing Like a Church: Solving a

SH Athlone        450-Year-Old Mystery and Rethinking the Dutch Reformation’

Feb 7                  Adrian Armstrong (Queen Mary), `Translating poetic capital in 15th-

SH Bedford        century Brussels: from Amé de Montgesoie’s Pas de la Mort to Colijn

Caillieu’s Dal sonder Wederkeeren’

Mar 7                 Martine Gosselink (Rijksmuseum), `The Rijksmuseum and its art and

SH Athlone        historical collections: a peaceful wedding?’

March 21           Mark Hay (King’s College London), `Revolutionary ideas on taxation:

SH Bedford       The Dutch fiscal policy of the period 1795-1814’

Summer Term

May 9                Liesbeth Corens (Cambridge), `Religious Coexistence in a Low

SH Athlone       Countries Health Resort: Protestants and Catholics at Spa’

June 6                Claudia Swan (Northwestern), `Piracy, Porcelain, Profit: Exotic Negoti-

SH Athlone       ations and Early Seventeenth-Century Global Politics’

 

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9.

Essex: The cultural impact of an Elizabethan courtier

One-Day Symposium

Saturday 26th October, 12-4.30pm

Sheffield Hallam University, Room 9003, Cantor Building, City Campus

This one-day symposium marks the publication of a new collection of essays about the life and cultural impact of Robert Devereux, second earl of Essex.  It brings together scholars who have been involved with the collection and whose research continues to engage with some of the issues and questions raised by their work for the volume.  The papers will consider a selection of the diverse visual and textual manifestations of Essex and his circle in poetry and portraiture, as well as in texts produced by the earl himself.

There is no registration fee and refreshments will be provided, but we do require you to e-mail us in advance to book a place: A.F.Connolly@shu.ac.uk

12 noon Arrival and Coffee

12.15 –1.15  Session One

12.15 – Welcome and Opening Remarks – Lisa Hopkins (Sheffield Hallam University)

12.30 ‘”Mine excuse must only be the worthiness of former precedents”: Gervase Markham’s English Arcadia and the Earl of Essex’s Sidneian Inheritance’. Richard Wood (Sheffield Hallam University)

1.15 Lunch 

2.15 – 3.15pm – Session Two

‘More Poetry by the Earl of Essex?’ Hugh Gazzard (St. Hugh’s College, Oxford)

‘From Imitation to Counterfeit: Essex’s hand in correspondence’. Andrew Gordon (University of Aberdeen).

3.15-3.30pm – Coffee

3.30-4.30pm

 ‘”Still renewing wronges”: Gheeraert’s Persian Lady Revealed’. Chris Laoutaris (Shakespeare Institute, University of Birmingham) and Yasmin Arshad (University College London

4.30pm Closing Remarks and conclusion of Symposium

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10.

 

12th ESSE CONFERENCE
in KOŠICE, SLOVAKIA
UPJS FF UPJS
Friday 29 August – Tuesday 2 September, 2014

Seminar on English manuscript studies

The focus is on editing manuscripts from all periods, whether they be strictly literary or not. The seminar is particularly interested in unpublished material in manuscript. Research topics include, and are not restricted to, finding manuscripts and archival work, manuscript collections, scribal work, paleography, manuscripts as books, the coexistence of manuscripts and printed books, what manuscripts tell us on reading habits, editing manuscripts, electronic versus printed editions, manuscript studies and digital humanities. Manuscript studies have been on the cutting edge of literary theory and papers on authorship, the constitution of the text or hermeneutics are welcome.

Please send your proposals to: Carlo Bajetta (Università della Valle d’Aosta, Italy)

carlo.bajetta@univda.it and Guillaume Coatalen (Université de Cergy-Pontoise, France)

guillaumecoatalen@hotmail.com

 

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 11.

The Women’s Studies Group 1558-1837 is an informal and friendly society that meets regularly at the University of London, UK.

We’re delighted to announce that our seminar series for the 2013-14 academic year begins on September 28; all those visiting or based in the UK are welcome to attend.

VENUE: Room 234 in the Senate House, Malet Street, University of London. 2pm-5pm 

Alison Winch: ‘Drinking a dish of tea with Sapho': The Sexual Fantasies of Lady Mary Wortley Montagu and Lord Byron.

Eleonora Capra: Jane Austen in Italy Now and Then (2007).

Kathryn Lowerre: Catholicism, Music, and Money in the Life of an English Opera Singer: Anastasia Robinson.

Corrina Connor: Did Bluestockings play the violin? Music, morals and masculinity in the intellectual societies of eighteenth-century London.

Please share this e-mail with friends and colleagues.

Our full 2013/14 programme is available on our website (link below), with subsequent sessions taking place on 30 November and 25 January.

Any questions, don’t hesitate to contact me.

We hope you can join us.

Kind regards

Louise Duckling (e: louise@philipmarksav.co.uk)

On behalf of the Women’s Studies Group 1558-1837

www.womenstudiesgroup.org.uk

 

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 12.

For information on the upcoming conference “Early Modern Rome 2″ in celebration of the 10th anniversary of the UCEAP “Rome Through the Ages” program, organized by the University of California, Rome Study Center with ACCENT, and in collaboration with the Istituto storico italiano per il Medioevo, the Biblioteca Vallicelliana, the Archivio Storico Capitolino, and the Castello Orsini-Odescalchi di Bracciano, see:
The conference (free and open to the public) will be held from October 10-12, 2013, but all attendees need to register on the conference website.

 

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 13.

The London Renaissance Seminar will meet on Saturday 19th October to discuss:

Creating Early Modern Memory

Speakers include Johanna Harris, University of Exeter; Kate Hodgkin, University of East London; Alexandra Walsham, University of Cambridge; Gillian Woods, Birkbeck, University of London

Saturday 19th October 2013

1-5pm, 43 Gordon Square, School of Arts, Birkbeck

All welcome, no registration necessary.

Any queries to elizabeth.scott-bauman@kcl.ac.uk

 

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 14.

Emma Dillon – Remembering to Forget: Music, Conversion, and the Early Cistercian Experience

Tuesday 1st October 2013
5pm, ArtsTwo Room 3.16
Queen Mary, University of London
Mile End Road E1 4NS

Please join Queen Mary’s Centre for Renaissance and Early Modern Studies and QM Music and Sound for the first event of the academic year. Followed by wine and discussion. Attendance is free; all welcome.

Remembering to Forget: Music, Conversion, and the Early Cistercian Experience

The Cistercian order emerged at the end of the eleventh century, purportedly as a reaction against the decadent excesses associated with the Cluniac tradition. According to the foundational theological and administrative writings of the order, to be Cistercian was to convert; and to convert was to actively forget the trappings of a former religious or secular life. The narrative of conversion and reform appears to correspond to other evidence that early Cistercian houses promoted a reactionary austerity, eschewing decadent material trappings of devotion in favor of a simpler and less distracting devotional environment. That impulse was seemingly true of music: Cistercian liturgy is well-known in the history of medieval chant for its reforms, manifest, for example, in an expunging of melodic ornament and a ban on polyphony.

This paper takes a closer look at the evidence of contemporary writers, music theory and extant liturgical manuscripts and suggests that reforming chant was less an act of erasure or displacement of past traditions. Instead, it argues that there was potentially a virtue in remembering what one was supposed to forget.

Professor Emma Dillon (King’s College London) studied music at Oxford, where completed a DPhil in 1998. She was a Lecturer at the University of Bristol, and Assistant Professor and Professor at the University of Pennsylvania, where she also served as Chair of the Department. She has been a Visiting Professor at the University of California at Berkeley, a Member and Visitor at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton, and a Visiting Scholar at Corpus Christi College, Oxford. She joined the Music Department at King’s in 2013.

Her research focuses on European musical culture from the twelfth to fourteenth centuries. Her work ranges widely in terms of repertories, sources, and methodology, and falls at the intersection of musicology, sound studies, medieval studies, and the history of material texts. She is the author of Medieval Music-Making and the Roman de Fauvel (Cambridge University Press, 2002) and The Sense of Sound: Musical Meaning in France, 1260-1330 (Oxford University Press in 2012).

 

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 15.

Horace in Renaissance France: Poetry and Scholarship
The Warburg Institute, November 29th 2013
(organizers: Daniel Andersson, Ariane Schwartz)
This colloquium will examine both the scholarly and the literary Horace in Renaissance France. Although the works of Horace may have been a relatively late arrival on the educational scene in France (compared to Vergil or Seneca), his influence was crucial in the formation of both the identity of ‘the Poet’ and ideas of philosophical liberty. The publication of the great commentary by the Denys Lambin acted as a sort of fillip to the securer presence of Horace in France, and encouraged a raft of translations. Furthermore his commentary, especially the second edition, marked a sort of coronation of Lambin as a pre-eminent Parisian philologus. Horace turns out to be a crucial part of the story of how France’s identity was fashioned as a second Rome, with a second Augustus and a second Maecenas. Yet much remains to be done. The  nuts and bolts of marginalia and commentaries have still not been subjected to the kind of scrutiny that they reward; the regional stories and the impact of the Italian vernacular literature has yet to be assessed; and finally, it is hoped that all participants will come away from the conference with a clearer idea of the disciplinary boundaries that cluster around and between ‘reception’ and ‘reading’. Post-graduate students are, in particular, warmly invited to attend. Presentations will be in both French and English.

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 16.

UCL IMARS Seminars

Full schedule for this year’s seminar, please follow the link:

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/mars/seminars-lectures/imars_13_14

Best Regards,

Alison Ray

Email: alison.ray09@ucl.ac.uk

Co-convenor and PhD Student in Medieval History, UCL

 

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 17.

Coming soon to The Courtauld Gallery

The Young Dürer: Drawing the Figure

17 October 2013 – 12 January 2014

 

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 18.

The Early Modern Research Centre, University of Reading

Reading Conference in Early Modern Studies, 7-9 July 2014: call for papers

The Reading Early Modern Conference continues to establish itself as the place where early modernists meet each July for stimulation, conversation and debate. As in previous years, proposals of individual papers and panels are invited on research in any aspect of early modern studies relating to Britain, Europe and the wider world. This year, the plenary speakers are Randall McLeod (Toronto) and Tony Claydon (Bangor).

We would welcome proposals for individual papers and panels on any aspect of early modern literature, history, art, music and culture. Panels have been proposed on the following themes and further panels or individual papers are also invited on these topics or any other aspect of early modern studies:

  • 1714: the death of Queen Anne, the last of the Stuarts; succession in a British and European context.
  • Material texts: technologies of paper, pen and print; binding and unbinding books; compilation, collection, anthologising; modern technologies and early modern texts.
  • Writers’ career choices: poetry versus plays; theatre history; plague closures; history of printing; debates over authorship.
  • Knowledge, method, practice; mechanic arts; guilds and mysteries; tacit knowledge; statecraft andarcana imperii; how-to manuals; thinking about thinking.

Proposals for panels should consist of a minimum of two and a maximum of four papers.

Each panel proposal should contain the names of the session chair, the names and affiliations of the speakers and short abstracts (200 word abstracts) of the papers together with email contacts for all participants. A proposal for an individual paper should consist of a 200 word abstract of the paper with brief details of affiliation and career.

Proposals for either papers or panels should be sent by email to the chair of the Conference Committee, Dr. Rebecca Bullard, by 6 January 2014, r.bullard@reading.ac.uk

We welcome proposals from postgraduates, and the conference hopes to make some money available for postgraduate bursaries. Anyone for whom some financial assistance is a prerequisite for their attendance should mention this when submitting their proposal.

 

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19.

Text and Book in the Age of Swift

We would be very grateful if you would share the information about this conference with members of your department.

Text and Book in the Age of Swift

A day conference on 23 November 2013

St Peter’s College Oxford

Speakers include

Paddy Bullard (University of Kent)

Pat Rogers (University of South Florida)

Valerie Rumbold (University of Birmingham)

Abigail Williams (University of Oxford)

In a period when the English and Irish book trades were increasing their political and commercial importance, no one had a sharper eye for print’s expressive and satirical potential than Swift. Papers at this conference will review his relationship to books, query his literary and book-trade contexts, detail new research on eighteenth-century editions of Shakespeare and Spenser, and reflect on the editing of volumes in the Cambridge Swift.

Registration

There will be conference fee of £20 which will cover lunch, coffee, and tea. Participants will be invited to a reception at St Peter’s to celebrate the publication of the Cambridge edition of Swift’s Journal to Stella, edited by Abigail Williams, and a collection supplementary to the edition, Swift and the Eighteenth-Century Book, edited by Paddy Bullard and James McLaverty.

The registration form can be downloaded at

http://www.spc.ox.ac.uk/event/22/331/text_and_book_in_the_age_of_swift.html

Please return the form by email to alison.wiblin@spc.ox.ac.uk or by post to Alison Wiblin, St Peter’s College, Oxford, OX1 2DL. Payment should be in the form a cheque made out to Abigail Williams, or money can be paid in directly to the appropriate bank account.

Academic enquiries should be addressed to the Conference Coordinators, Abigail Williams and James McLaverty, atswift@spc.ox.ac.uk

Jonathan Swift and the Eighteenth-Century Book

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 20.

Please find below the Call for Papers for the Second Annual Postgraduate Renaissance Symposium:

–       The Visual Arts and Music in Renaissance Europe c.1400 – 1650, which will take place at The Courtauld on Saturday 18 January 2014

Please send proposals of no more than 250 words and your academic CV by 4 November 2013 torenaissanceartandmusic@gmail.com

For further information:http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/researchforum/events/2013/autumn/jan18_RenaissanceArtsMusicSymposium.shtml

With best wishes

Research Forum

The Courtauld Institute of Art

Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN

www.courtauld.ac.uk

 

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 21.

We are writing to let you know about the exciting and varied range of events taking place at the Warburg Institute during 2013/14.

The complete Annual Programme is available at: http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/fileadmin/images/events/AnnualProgramme2013_14.pdf

Listed below are just a few of the events taking  place during the Autumn term:

Public Lectures

  • 9 October – Love and Pastoral: Constructing a History of Arcadia – Dr Paul Holberton
  • 10, 17 and 24 October – E H Gombrich Lecture Series on the Classical Tradition – Ancient Strength by Professor Jonathan Bate, Provost, Worcester College, University of Oxford

Colloquia

  • 25 October – Sculpture in Rome: Rethinking Classicism and Questioning Materiality
  • 7 – 8 November – Platonism after Plato in the Renaissance
  • 16 December – The Afterlife of the Kulturwissenschaftliche Bibliothek. Hamburg and London Traditions in the Development of the Warburg Institute. A Commemoration of the Migration in December 1933

Further details about all our events are available on our website at: http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/nc/events/

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 22.

Two Calleva Centre three-year Postdoctoral Research Associates
 
Magdalen College (University of Oxford) proposes to appoint two postdoctoral research associates in connection with a collaborative project entitled Adults at Play(s). Both posts are for three years from 1 October 2014. Candidates must have a doctorate in hand by that date. They will already have demonstrated outstanding promise either in the study of dramatic literature or in experimental psychology, and will have an aptitude and enthusiasm for interdisciplinary work across these areas. The postholders will collaborate with three fellows of the college (Felix Budelmann, Robin Dunbar and Laurie Maguire) in developing experimental and text-based research on the psychology of the audience, with particular reference to classical Greek and early modern English drama. Informal enquiries should be directed to felix.budelmann@magd.ox.ac.uk,robin.dunbar@magd.ox.ac.uk or laurie.maguire@magd.ox.ac.uk.
Both appointments will be made at points 29-31 on the University Salary Scale 7, currently £29,541-£31,331 p.a.; plus benefits.
Application forms and further particulars, which include information on how to apply, are available at www.magd.ox.ac.uk/vacancies/ . The deadline for applications is UK time 12 noon on 1 November 2013.
Magdalen College is an Equal Opportunities Employer.

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 23.

British Branch of the International Courtly Literature Society (ICLS)

University of Exeter, Monday 14th and Tuesday 15th April, 2014

Call for Papers:

The next meeting of the British Branch of the International Courtly Literature Society will take place on 14th/15th April 2014 at the University of Exeter, hosted by Dr Emma Cayley and Dr Thomas Hinton (Dept of Modern Languages: French)http://humanities.exeter.ac.uk/modernlanguages/

For those who are able to stay on Tuesday afternoon, a tour of Exeter Cathedral and the historic medieval centre of Exeter is planned. We will see the famous tenth-century Exeter Book (Codex Exoniensis) and other treasures of the Cathedral Library. http://www.exeter-cathedral.org.uk/

Proposals for papers of 25 minutes in length in any area of the Society’s interests are invited from the membership. Please send these to Dr Emma Cayley by email (e.j.cayley@exeter.ac.uk) or hard copy by 15th December 2013 to:

Dr Emma Cayley

Head of Modern Languages

College of Humanities

University of Exeter

Queen’s Building

Exeter EX4 4QH

Please include any particular AV requests with your proposal. All conference rooms are equipped with extensive AV facilities including fixed PC, powerpoint projection and screens.

 The conference will run from approx 11am on Monday 14th April to 2pm on Tuesday 15th April. All sessions will take place in the Margaret Rooms, located in the well-equipped Queen’s Building on the lovely Streatham Campus.

http://www.exeter.ac.uk/visit/directions/googlestreathammap/

B&B accommodation will be available for all delegates at the very comfortable Holland Hall, just a five to ten-minute walk from Queen’s Building on both Sunday and Monday nights if required. All rooms are en-suite with double beds, and many have unparalleled views over the Exwick Hills. Parking is available for residents.http://www.exeter.ac.uk/eventexeter/ourvenues/hollandhall/

Rates (approx):

Non-residential: Standard, £120; PG/unwaged, £95.

Residential (incl. Monday night B&B and Dinner at Holland Hall: Standard £200; PG/unwaged, £175.

Extra night B&B on Sunday available at £45 for single occupancy.  Double occupancy available for all B&B bookings.

Monday dinner at Holland Hall for non-residents: £35

Day delegate: Standard £65; PG/unwaged, £50.

All rates include tea/coffee/biscuits and buffet lunches.

 Registration forms will be available in due course from the conference website:http://humanities.exeter.ac.uk/modernlanguages/research/conferences/britishbranchoftheinternationalcourtlyliteraturesocietyicls/

 

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 24.

Following a successful first year, the History of Pre-Modern Medicine seminar series returns this autumn.  The 2013-14 series – organised by a group of historians of medicine based at London universities and hosted by the Wellcome Library – will commence with four seminars.

The series will be focused on pre-modern medicine, which we take to cover European and non-European history before the 20th century (antiquity, medieval and early modern history, some elements of 19th-century medicine). The seminars are open to all.

PROGRAMME FOR AUTUMN 2013

Tues 15th Oct, Anita Guerrini (Oregon State), ‘The Galenist as Mechanist: Claude Perrault and the Natural History of Animals’.

Tues 29th Oct, François-Olivier Touati (Tours), ‘Between the East and the West : transmission of diseases, connection of medical responses during the Middle Ages’.

Tues 5th Nov, Hannah Newton (Cambridge), ‘“O how sweet is ease!”: Recovering from Illness in Early Modern England, 1580-1720’.

Tues 19th Nov, Emilie Savage-Smith (Oxford) ‘“The Best Accounts of the Classes of Physicians”: A history of medicine throughout the known world, composed in Syria in the 13th century’.

All seminars will take place in the Wellcome Trust, Gibbs Building, 215 Euston Road, NW1 2BE.  Doors at 6pm prompt, seminars will start at 6.15.

The programme for January-March 2014 will follow in the new year.

Organising Committee: Elma Brenner (Wellcome Library), Sandra Cavallo (RHUL), John Henderson (BirkbeckUL) Colin Jones (QMUL), William MacLehose (UCL), Anna Maerker (KCL), Christelle Rabier (LSE), Patrick Wallis (LSE, convenor), Ronit Yoeli-Tlalim (Goldsmiths).

Enquiries to Ross MacFarlane (Wellcome Library: R.MacFarlane@wellcome.ac.uk) or Dr Patrick Wallis (LSE:p.h.wallis@lse.ac.uk).

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25.

The Gothic Ivories team is delighted to announce that 700 ‘new’ ivory carvings from over 60 different collections are now available online as part of the Gothic Ivories website! (www.gothicivories.courtauld.ac.uk)

Highlights include the Musei Vaticani in Rome, the Schnütgen Museum in CologneThe Burrell Collection in Glasgow, the Bonnefanten Museum in Maastricht, important collections in Madrid such as the Fundación Lázaro Galdiano and theInstituto Valencia de Don Juan, Scandinavian collections, from Copenhagen to Oslo, and from Stockholm to Lund, theMuseo di Capodimonte and Museo di Duca di Martina in Naples, the Czartoryski Museum in Cracow, the Museum of Applied Arts in Budapest, the Musée de l’Hôtel Sandelin in Saint-Omer, as well as many smaller and unexpected collections in Brie-Comte-RobertCapri, etc.!

The Gothic Ivories Project is also getting interested in so-called ‘fictile ivories’, i.e. casts of ivory sculptures made in the 19th century. As the Conway Library at the Courtauld Institute of Art has a small collection of such casts, we were able to add photographs of these to our corpus. For more details, see here:http://www.gothicivories.courtauld.ac.uk/stories/yvard_news.html

We wish to thank all collaborating institutions for their amazing support and all their work.

Happy browsing and, as always, spread the word!

Best wishes,

Catherine

Dr Catherine Yvard

Project Manager – Gothic Ivories Project

Witt Library

Courtauld Institute

Somerset House, Strand

London WC2R 0RN

Direct line: 00 44 (0) 20 7848 7657

The Gothic Ivories Website is now live! www.gothicivories.courtauld.ac.uk

 

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 26.

INSTITUTE OF HISTORICAL RESEARCH
Society, Culture and Belief, 1500-1800

Convenors: Laura Gowing (King’s College London), Kate Hodgkin (University of East London) Michael Hunter (Birkbeck) and Brodie Waddell (Birkbeck).

The academic year 2013-14 marks the 35th anniversary of the founding of this seminar in 1979, and this will be celebrated by a miscellany of papers by old and new friends of the seminar

 

Seminars will take place in the Bedford Room, G37, Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1, on the following Thursdays at 5.30 p.m. All are welcome!

10 October

Peter Burke (Emmanuel College, Cambridge)

 Generation: is this a useful category of analysis for early modern historians?

7 November

Michael Hunter (Birkbeck)

Boyle’s legacy: second sight in English and Scottish thought in the long 18th century

Friday 22 November  Joint session with Women’s History Seminar, in Senate House G21A

Sarah Fox (Manchester)

 ‘I do most sincerely wish you Dear Madam a Happy Minute': the experience of childbirth in the long 18th century

5 December

Matt Phillpott (IHR),

 Tracing the reputation of Polydore Vergil: scholarly debates and cultural change during    the English Reformation

23 January

Lyndal Roper (Oriel College, Oxford)

 [Title to be confirmed]

20 February

Mark Knights (University of Warwick)

 Corruption in early modern Britain

20 March

Katherine Hunt (University of East Anglia)

 Shuffle and play, read and learn: early modern English didactic playing cards.

 

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 27.

Call for book proposals: Literary & Scientific Cultures of Early Modernity

For more than a decade now, Literary and Scientific Cultures of Early Modernity,http://www.ashgate.com/LITSCI, has provided a forum for groundbreaking work on the relations between literary and scientific discourses in Europe, during a period when both fields were in a crucial moment of historical formation. We welcome proposals that address the many overlaps between modes of imaginative writing typical of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries—poetics, rhetoric, prose narrative, dramatic production, utopia—and the vocabularies, conceptual models, and intellectual methods of newly emergent ‘scientific’ fields such as medicine, astronomy, astrology, alchemy, psychology, mapping, mathematics, or natural history. In order to reflect the nature of intellectual inquiry during the period, the series is interdisciplinary in orientation and publishes monographs, edited collections, and selected critical editions of primary texts relevant to an understanding of the mutual implication of literary and scientific epistemologies.

As the series continues to evolve, we particularly seek submissions to do with:

·         alchemy

·         science in the New World

·         meteorology

·         knowledge networks

·         global science

·         machines

·         poetics and science

·         navigation/mapmaking

To submit a proposal, or for more information, please contact: Erika Gaffney, Publishing Manager,egaffney@ashgate.com

 

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 28.

Centre for Editing Lives and Letters Director’s Seminar schedule: http://www.livesandletters.ac.uk/?q=content/directors-seminar

 

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 29.

CENTENARY CONFERENCE:

                                 HUGH TREVOR-ROPER 1914-2014

A series of papers and discussions to mark the centenary of his birth (on 15 January) and to appraise aspects of his thought and writing.

The programme is given below. Those who have seen this document in an earlier form should please note the change of venue and the

closing date for full pre-registration. Any further announcements about the conference will be made on

www.hughtrevorroper.co.uk.

If you have difficulty in accessing this site, please email Blair Worden as below.

The conference, which is arranged by the Dacre Trust in association with the Oxford History Faculty, will be held on 

                                               SATURDAY 11 JANUARY 2014                                                 

                                                                     in the

                                   OXFORD UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION SCHOOLS

                                           (OX1 4AS: FOR TRAVEL FROM LONDON SEE BELOW)

                                                              Programme

9.30 – 10.00 Arrival and Registration

 10.00 – 11.30 SESSION 1: MID-SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY REVOLUTIONS

Sir John Elliott, ‘Trevor-Roper and “The General Crisis of the Seventeenth Century”’

Blair Worden, ‘The Unpublished Book: The Puritan Revolution’

Mark Greengrass, ‘“Three Foreigners: The Philosophers of the Puritan Revolution”’

                                                               COFFEE

11.55 – 1.00 SESSION 2: ERASMIANISM AND ECUMENICALISM

Peter N. Miller, ‘Trevor-Roper and the Erasmian Tradition’

Noel Malcolm, ‘Another Unpublished Book: “The Ecumenical Movement and the Church of England, 1598-1618”’

                                                         BUFFET LUNCH 

2.00 – 3.55 SESSION 3: THE SECOND WORLD WAR

Richard Overy, ‘The Last Days of Hitler’

Sir Michael Howard, ‘Trevor-Roper and Wartime Intelligence’

Eberhard Jäckel, ‘Trevor-Roper and Hitler’

Gina Thomas, ‘Trevor-Roper and Himmler’s Masseur’

                                                              T EA

4.15 – 4.50 SESSION 4: THE PROSE

John Banville, ‘Trevor-Roper as Prose Stylist’

4.50 – 5.30 SESSION 5: CONCLUDING DISCUSSION

Brief remarks by a sequence of speakers will precede comments from the floor. Provisional list of speakers:

Peter Ghosh

Colin Kidd

Noel Malcolm

Scott Mandelbrote

John Robertson

Paul Rose

Blair Worden

5.30 – 7.15 RECEPTION -

to celebrate the centenary, and to mark the publication of ONE HUNDRED LETTERS FROM HUGH TREVOR-ROPER, a selection of letters to a variety of correspondents written between 1943 and 2001. The book is edited by Richard Davenport-Hines and Adam Sisman and will be published by Oxford University Press. Those who have attended part or all of the conference will be welcome at the reception.

ARRANGEMENTS FOR ATTENDANCE AND PRE-REGISTRATION

THE PAPERS AND DISCUSSIONS ARE OPEN TO ALL, AND THOSE WHO COME TO THEM ARE WELCOME TO DO SO FOR EITHER ALL OR PART OF THE PROCEEDINGS. THERE IS NO CHARGE FOR ATTENDANCE OR FOR LUNCH OR REFRESHMENTS, BUT THOSE WISHING TO ATTEND WILL NEED TO PRE-REGISTER. SPACE IS LIMITED AND PLACES WILL BE ALLOCATED FIRST-COME-FIRST SERVED.

IN ANY CASE IT MAY NOT BE POSSIBLE TO OFFER LUNCH OR REFRESHMENTS, OR ATTENDANCE AT THE RECEPTION, TO ANYONE PRE-REGISTERING LATER THAN

                                                      MONDAY 9 DECEMBER 

TO PRE-REGISTER PLEASE EMAIL BLAIR WORDEN (WHO WILL BE HAPPY TO ANSWER QUERIES) AT

blair.worden@history.ox.ac.uk

THOSE PRE-REGISTERING SHOULD PLEASE  SAY WHETHER I) THEY WILL TAKE LUNCH; (2) THEY WILL ATTEND THE RECEPTION; (3) THEY EXPECT TO ATTEND ALL THE SESSIONS OR, IF NOT, FOR WHICH OF THEM THEY PLAN TO BE PRESENT. THEY SHOULD PLEASE MENTION ANY DIETARY REQUIREMENTS FOR LUNCHTIME.

TRAVEL FROM LONDON

The Examination Schools, which are in the High Street, are by the Queen’s Lane bus stop, where London buses stop.

DACRE CENTENARY LECTURES

In the autumn of 2014 a series of Dacre Centenary Lectures will be held, in
association with the Oxford History Faculty, in the Examination Schools,
Oxford, on Fridays at 5 p.m., provisionally under the title ‘IDEAS AND SOCIETY
c. 1600-1800’. The speakers will be
 ANTHONY GRAFTON, MICHAEL HUNTER, JONATHAN ISRAEL, COLIN KIDD, NOEL MALCOLM, DAVID WOMERSLEY AND BRIAN YOUNG.

 

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 30.

For more information: http://colleges2014.wordpress.com/

Collegial Communities in Exile Conference: New histories of the Irish, English, Scots, Dutch and other colleges founded on the continent in the early modern period

Mary Immaculate College, University of Limerick, Ireland ― 19-20 June 2014

Early modern Europe witnessed the large-scale migration of peoples for religious, political, economic, social and other reasons. This important feature of European history has received sustained attention from scholars in recent decades as research has increasingly pointed to the transnational nature of early modern societies. One of the striking features of early modern Catholic migration, especially from Ireland, England and Scotland, was the establishment of national ‘colleges’ on the continent to facilitate the formation and education of clerical and lay students. William Allen’s foundation of an English College at Douai in 1568 was quickly followed by others, as well as by Scots Colleges (the Scots College in Paris was unusual: it pre-dated Allen’s Douai establishment) and more than forty Irish Colleges stretching from Leuven to Rome and Lisbon to Prague. This phenomenon was not confined to English, Scots and Irish Catholics: Leuven and other cities witnessed the foundation of Dutch Colleges, while Rome saw a dramatic increase in the number of colleges hosting foreign students. The importance of the colleges has long been recognised by historians, but their histories have too often been located within isolated national or confessional historiographical traditions. Far from exile outposts, the colleges were dynamic focal points of migrant communities. This conference seeks to re-conceptualise the colleges in a comparative framework by exploring the histories of Irish, English, Scots, Dutch, Roman and other colleges together and by drawing parallels with educational institutions established by other religious minorities and refugees.

The conference welcomes proposals for papers on any aspect of the Irish, English, Scots, Dutch, Roman or other colleges in the early modern period or in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We also welcome proposals for papers on individuals or groups associated with the colleges.

Papers dealing with neglected issues are especially welcome, including: buildings, spaces and architecture; material culture; music; social and financial histories; relationships with migrant communities and networks; relationships with host societies (including state and municipal authorities; universities; churches; religious houses); political and intellectual engagements; self-fashioning and the colleges; the ‘afterlives’ of the colleges in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; the historiography of the colleges; parallel institutions established by other religious minorities and refugees in early modern Europe.

Proposals for 25-minute papers should be submitted by e-mail to Liam Chambers (Liam.Chambers@mic.ul.ie) before 17 January 2014. Proposals should include: name, institutional affiliation (if appropriate), paper title, and a 250-word abstract. We also welcome proposals for three-speaker panels. Postgraduate students are particularly encouraged to offer papers. Prospective speakers will be notified of a decision in February 2014 at the latest.

Plenary Speakers: Professor Willem Frijhoff (VU University, Amsterdam) on Dutch Colleges;Professor Michael Questier (Queen Mary, University of London) on English Colleges; Dr Thomas O’Connor (National University of Ireland, Maynooth) on Irish Colleges; ProfessorMícheál Mac Craith (St Isidore’s College, Rome) on the colleges of the Irish regular clergy; a speaker to be confirmed on Scots Colleges

 

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 31.

You may be interested in a one day colloquium being hosted at Queen Mary, University of London on Saturday 7 December, 2013. The event is ‘Reading, Writing and Religion, 1660-1830′. See the attached CFP and colloquium website for further details: http://writingandreligion.wordpress.com/
All best,

Victoria Van Hyning
PhD Candidate, University of Sheffield
Department of English Literature
‘Letters and Lives’ British Library studentship holder
MSt Oxford
www.pickeringchatto.com/convents

 

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 32.

‘Lewis as Critic’
23rd November, 2013
Cripps Court, Magdalene College, Cambridge
In this one-day conference we will discuss the significance of C.S.
Lewis’ contribution to the practice of criticism and commemorate the
50th anniversary of his death.
We have Rt. Rev Dr. Rowan Williams on Lewis’ Milton; Prof. Helen Cooper
on Lewis as Medievalist; Prof. Ad Putter on Lewis and Allegory; Rev. Dr.
Malcolm Guite on Lewis’ Abolition of Man; Prof. Stephen Prickett on
Criticism, Theology and Fiction and Dr. Stephen Logan on Lewis’ Soul.
Some of the issues we plan to discuss are how do we think of Lewis’
critical writing now; is he still on our reading lists; what do students
make of his views on literature?
Registration closes on 25th October, 2013
For more information, and to register, please visit:
lewisascritic.wordpress.com
For updates of conference news, ‘follow’ us on twitter @lewisascritic
To contact us, email lewisascritic@gmail.com

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 33.

Please find attached and at this link details of the fifth Early Modern Symposium at the Courtauld Institute of Art on Saturday 26 October.

http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/researchforum/events/2013/autumn/oct26_FifthEarlyModernSymposium.shtml

 

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 34.

Classical Philosophers in Seventeenth Century English Thought

28 May 2014, CREMS, University of York

A day symposium – Keynote speakers: Prof Jessica Wolfe (North Carolina) and Prof Sarah Hutton (Aberystwyth)

This one day symposium will look at the reception of classical philosophers in seventeenth century English thought and culture, in philosophy, religion, natural philosophy, poetry and literature, the university, or other areas of early modern intellectual life. The focus will be on England, but not on English, and we encourage papers on the Latin reception of classical philosophy.

We will take the term ‘classical philosophy’ broadly speaking, and with a generic latitude, so that Homer or Hesiod might be considered, as they certainly were in the early modern period, as contributors to the philosophical outlook of the ancients, and so that while Aristotle, Plato, Epicurus, Seneca or Cicero are central and protean in their seventeenth century reception, so too Virgil, Ovid and Lucretius were seen as containing an important philosophical core.  Of interest also might be the collations and compendia of classical thought that served as a digest of ancient ideas, whether those of the ancients themselves, such as Diogenes Laertius, or of the early modern writers, such as Thomas Stanley’s History of Philosophy. How did early modern writers accommodate, transpose or circumvent the pagan elements in ancient philosophy? How concerned were early modern thinkers with the systematic and with completeness in their use of classical philosophers? How was the pagan religion transposed to a Christian era?

Abstracts by 15th December (c. 250 words)

Contact: Kevin Killeen, kevin.killeen@york.ac.uk

This symposium is part of a diffuse and ongoing Thomas Browne Seminar that has digressed quite far: http://www.york.ac.uk/english/news-events/browne/

 

 

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 35.

 

 

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 36.

The Keith Walker Memorial Lecture 2013 will take place at 6.30pm on Thursday 14th November, in the Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre, UCL, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT. There are maps and directions at http://www.ucl.ac.uk/maps. Please reserve your place by going to keithwalker.eventbrite.co.uk. All welcome.
 

Professor Sir Brian Vickers (Honorary Research Professor of UCL English) will speak on “The One King Lear“.

The Keith Walker Memorial Lecture is a biennial event to commemorate a much loved member of staff of UCL English Department who was a renowned editor of Rochester, Dryden, and Marvell. This year we look forward to an exciting and thought-provoking lecture by the distinguished scholar Sir Brian Vickers. Since the 1980s it has been generally accepted that Shakespeare revised King Lear in around 1610, and that the Quarto and Folio editions represent two substantially different plays, often printed separately in modern editions. Professor Vickers will present evidence to refute this view.

 

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37.

 Please find below details of the 2013 autumn term programme for the Research Seminars. (All seminars are free /open to all and taking place at The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, WC2R 0RN London )EARLY MODERN

·          Monday, 14 October – Nick Grindle (University College London): Marginal Figures: A New Approach to George Morland. 6.00pm, Research Forum South Room

·          Monday, 28 October – Speaker TBC. 6.00pm, Research Forum South Room

  • Monday, 25 November – Meredith Gamer (Yale University): Hanged, Quartered, and Drawn: Visual cultures of the Criminal Body from Tyburn to the Academy. 6.00pm, Research Forum South Room

RENAISSANCE

·          Wednesday, 16 October – Cristina Terzaghi (Università degli Studi Roma Tre): Caravaggio and Copies: Art Market and the Birth of a Style. 5.30pm, Research Forum South Room

·          Wednesday, 6 November – Laura Teza (Università degli Studi di Perugia): Caravaggio’s The Boy Peeling Fruit and the Academy of the Insensati. 5.30pm, Research Forum South Room 

·          Thursday, 5 December – Denise Allen (Frick Collection, New York): Considering Antico after an Exhibition.6.00pm (note time), Research Forum South Room

All seminars are free and open to all

Further information : http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/researchforum/calendar.shtml

Research Forum

The Courtauld Institute of Art

Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN

 

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 38.

NEW Cultures of Knowledge Lunchtime Seminar Series: Negotiating Networks

Theme: early modern letters, networks and the digital humanities.

Thursdays 1pm, 31st Oct – 5th Dec: Conference Room, Oxford e-Research Centre, Keble Road

Lunch provided (first come, first served)

http://www.culturesofknowledge.org/?page_id=1270

All welcome!

NB: Nov 21st seminar will be held in Room 8, St Anne’s College, Woodstock Road

 

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39.

‘Renaissance Loves’

London Renaissance Seminar

9 November, 2.00pm-6.00pm

Room 124

Birkbeck College,

43 Gordon Square,

London WC1.

Ms Linda Grant   (Birkbeck)‘“Loved as no woman shall ever be loved again”: Catullus and the shaping of sixteenth-century English love poetry.’

Professor Stephen Guy-Bray (Toronto) , ‘”Militat omnis amans”: Love as War in Renaissance Sonnets.’

Professor Ian Moulton (Arizona), ‘Love in Print: Romance and the Book Market.’

Professor Will Fisher (NYU) “Seignor Dildo’s Adventures in Britain”:Sexual Instruments and Women’s Erotic Agency in England, c.1600-1725.’

Organisers: Linda Grant, Judith Hudson, Sue Wiseman

Contact: s.wiseman@bbk.ac.uk

 

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40.

“REVISITING EARLY MODERN PROPHECIES (c.1500-c.1815)”
26–28 June, 2014 
Goldsmiths, London
The Reformation dramatically changed Europe’s religious and political landscapes within a few decades. The Protestant emphasis on translating the Scriptures into the vernacular and the developments of the printing press rapidly gave increased visibility to the most obscure parts of the Bible. Similarly, Spanish and Italian mystics promoted a spiritual regeneration of the Catholic Church during the Counter-Reformation. Prophecies, whether of biblical, ancient or popular origin, as well as their interpretations gradually began reaching a wider audience, sparking controversies throughout all levels of society across Europe. In recent years, new research has eroded the long standing historiographical consensus of an increasing secularisation accelerated by the Enlightenment, which allegedly cast away beliefs in prophecies and miracles as outmoded. The multiplication of case studies on millenarian movements suggests a radically different picture, yet many questions remain. How did prophecies evolve with the politico-religious conjunctions of their time? Who read them? How seriously were they taken?This three-day, international conference will aim to answer these questions by bringing together scholars from around the world to reassess the importance of prophecies from the Reformation to the French Revolution and beyond. We therefore invite papers and panel proposals on prophecy in Europe and the Mediterranean world between approximately 1500 and 1800. Possible topics may include, but are not limited to: apocalyptic predictions, the Antichrist, millenarianism, irenicism, wonders and miracles, astrology and divination, ecumenical movements, religious utopias, mystical networks, enthusiasts and female mystics.‌Keynote speakers:Prof. Irena Backus (Geneva)
Prof. Nigel Smith (Princeton)
Prof. Christopher Rowland (Oxford)

Other confirmed speakers:Federico Barbierato
Jürgen Beyer
Vittoria Feola
David Finnegan
Mercedes García-Arenal
Crawford Gribben
Jacques Halbronn
Warren Johnston
Nick McDowell
Jo SpaansProposals for 20-minute papers in English (maximum 300 words) with a short bio are invited, and should be sent by 31 October 2013 to either of the conference organisers:Dr Ariel Hessayon  a.hessayon(@gold.ac.uk)
Dr Lionel Laborie  l.laborie(@gold.ac.uk)

 

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41.

Society for Neo-Latin Studies:

Annual Lecture

November 8th 5 p.m.

 King’s College London, Classics Department, Room B6

emeritus professor roger p.h. green

(University of Glasgow)

The Poetry of George Buchanan  1973-2023

Professor Green’s lecture will review the remarkable surge in scholarly study of the poetry of George Buchanan (1506-82) over recent years, and also look forward to the next decade. He will concentrate in particular on Ian McFarlane’s biography of Buchanan (1981) and the work, sadly now truncated, of the late Philip Ford  (especially his George Buchanan, Prince of Poets, 1982), without forgetting Buchanan’s tragedies (Walsh and Sharratt, 1983) or John Durkan’s Bibliography of George Buchanan (1994).  Such fundamental works continue to stimulate and inform Buchanan research, as does more recent work, much of it benefiting from Philip Ford’s help and leadership. By 2023, perhaps, the surge will seem unique for a Neo-Latin poet.

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42.

*British Milton Seminar, 19 October 2013: Programme* Saturday 19 October 2013

Venue: In the Birmingham and Midland Institute

[**PLEASE NOTE**]. There will be two sessions, from 11.00 am to 12.30 pm and from 2.00 pm to 4.00 pm

Programme: 11.00-12.30 John Coffey (Leicester), ‘Milton and Augustine revisited’; Nicholas McDowell (Exeter), ‘Milton and Pamela’s Prayer: Revisiting a Cold Case’.

2.00-4.00 Ivana Bičak (Leeds), ‘Gaudensque viam fecisse ruina: The Grotesque Mode in the Epic Poetry of Milton and Lucan’; Cedric Brown (Reading), ‘Milton and Cyriac Skinner revisited’.

The Birmingham and Midland Institute (BMI) was founded by Act of Parliament in 1854, for ‘the Diffusion and Advancement of Science, Literature and Art amongst all Classes of Persons resident in Birmingham and the Midland Counties,’ and continues to pursue these aims. The BMI is located in the heart of Birmingham’s city centre, just a few minutes’ walk from Birmingham New Street, Snow Hill and Moor Street railway stations: Birmingham and Midland Institute Margaret Street Birmingham B3 3BS

Please follow this link for a map of the BMI’s location, and for further information about the BMI and its Library: http://bmi.org.uk/location.html

For further information about the British Milton Seminar, please contact either: Professor Thomas N. Corns (els009@bangor.ac.uk), or Dr Hugh Adlington (h.c.adlington@bham.ac.uk). Thomas N. Corns and Hugh Adlington (Co-convenors)

You can follow the British Milton Seminar at: http://britishmiltonseminar

 

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43.

The first SOAS Research Seminar in Islamic Art of this year takes place on Thursday 24th October, at 5.30 in B111 (as usual). I am pleased to welcome Dr Martínez-de-Castilla-Muñoz, visiting fellow from the University Complutense of Madrid. Looking forward to seeing you there.
 
SIXTEENTH CENTURY BINDINGS IN THE WESTERN ISLAMIC WORLD
Dr. Nuria Martínez-de-Castilla-Muñoz (UCM)

In 1502, the Muslims who lived in the Iberian Peninsula were obliged to convert to Christianity; however, from that date on, some crypto-Islamic communities, called Moriscos, remained in Spain until their final expulsion in 1609. Even if they were obliged to give up their religion, customs and language, they still copied Islamic texts in Spanish in Arabic script (aljamiado), or even in Arabic. When it came to binding their manuscripts, they did not follow the old Islamic techniques, but the Christian ones.

On the other hand, during the same century, Morocco went through a strained political relationship with the Ottoman empire. However, as far as their books were concerned, Moroccan binders tried to follow the Ottoman aesthetical models.

The aim of this presentation is to analyse the bindings among the Islamic communities of these two countries, from a double point of view –technical and aesthetic-, under the paradoxical cultural influence of Christians and Ottomans, respectively.

 

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44.

‘Death in Scotland, from the medieval to the modern: beliefs, attitudes and practices’ (CFP, Conference, Edinburgh, 31 Jan–2 Feb 2014)

‘Death in Scotland, from the medieval to the modern: beliefs, attitudes and practices’

New College, University of Edinburgh,

Friday 31 January 2014 – Sunday 2 February 2014

Plenary speakers include:

• Professor Jane Dawson, John Laing Professor of Reformation History, Edinburgh University: “‘With one foot in the grave”: death in life and life in death in Reformation Scotland’.

• Professor Richard Fawcett, O.D.E., School of Art History, University of St Andrews: ‘The architectural setting of prayers for the dead in later medieval Scotland’.

• Dr Lizanne Henderson, Lecturer in History, School of Interdisciplinary Studies, University of Glasgow:‘Fairies, Angels and the Land of the Dead: Robert Kirk’s Lychnobious People’.

• Professor Sarah Tarlow, Director ofthe Centre for Historical Archaeology, University of Leicester: ‘Beliefs about bodies: contradictions and conundrums in early modern Scotland’.

A plenary panel will discuss childhood death.

This conference invites those who are researching death from whatever disciplinary perspective to offer papers. These will be particularly welcome on the subjects of:

• Death, grief and mourning; • Death, poverty, age gender and status; • Burial and cremation; • Legal and medical aspects of death; • Folklore, customs and rituals; • Death, urban and rural comparisons; • Violent death, including war; • Death in literature and the visual arts; • Plague pestilence and famine; • Theology, liturgy and funeral ministry; • Childhood death; • Architecture, landscape and monuments

Established research and work-in-progress welcomed,

Abstracts of 200 words maximum should be sent by 31 October 2013 to Peter Jupp or Susan Buckham.

For more information, click here.

 

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45.

This Saturday (19th October) a free study day is being held sponsored by the Who Were the Nuns? Project in Brentwood, Essex. Please contact James Kelly on James.Kelly3@durham.ac.uk to find out if there are still places available.

On Saturday 2 November a second event will be held in central Manchester. I am attaching the flyer for the second event.  Please contact c.bowden@qmul.ac.uk if you would like to come. Find out how you can use the database to do Family History and more. All welcome.

 

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46.

 

Seminar Series 2013-14

Travel: Bodies and Objects in Motion

Convenors: Sandra Cavallo, Jane Hamlett, Stella Moss, Weipin Tsai

Seminar co-ordinator: Charlotte Brown

Seminars will take place at Royal Holloway, 11 Bedford Square, on Wednesdays at 5pm.

 2013

23 October,  Giorgio Riello and Anne Gerritsen (Warwick),‘Spaces of Global Interactions: The Material Landscapes of Global History’

13 November, Ruth Livesey (RHUL), ‘Dickens and America: Transport and the Making of Place in the 1840s’

11 December, Aaron Moore (Manchester), ‘Physical Dimensions of Self: Diaries and Self-Discipline in East Asian Armies, 1937-1945′

2014

29 January, Carl Thompson (Nottingham Trent), ‘Gender and the Romanticization of Travel Writing; Maria Graham’s Journal of a Residence in Chile’

26 February, joint session on letters: Charlotte Brown (RHUL)  ‘The Objects of Men’s Affections in their Letters Home 1760-1830′; Weipin Tsai (RHUL), ‘‘’Bright is the Moon over my Home Village: the Family Letters of Chinese Merchants in Late Qing China’.

12 March, Ann Massey (Middlesex), ‘Bodies at sea: Colonial Discourses and Ocean Liner Design’.

ALL WELCOME!

If you are coming from outside RHUL please notify Charlotte Brown: charlotte.brown.2010 @live.rhul.ac.uk| in advance so that we can let security at Bedford Square know that you are coming.

Newsletter 41

By Alexander Samson, on 5 September 2013

  1. Hugh Trevor-Roper Centenary Conference: Oxford 11 January 2014
  2. London Summer School in Intellectual History, a joint UCL-QMUL venture. Details here: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/history/events/london-summer-school
  3. Translating Cultures in the Hispanic World, 7-8 November 2013, University of Edinburgh
  4. CFP – Scientiae 2014, the third annual conference on the emergent knowledge practices of the early modern period (ca. 1450-1750), University of Vienna, 23-25 April 2014.
  5. Article submissions invited for Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal.  
  6. The Fifteenth Century Conference: Christ Church, Oxford 5th, 6th and 7th September 2013.
  7. Homage Volume for David Hook.
  8. Ben Jonson’s Epic ‘Foot Voyage’ to Scotland – a Digital Journey http://bit.ly/BJWblog
  9. Call for book proposals: Women & Gender in the Early Modern World
  10. Call for Papers, 49th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, MI, 8-11 May, 2014 ELIZABETH I and OTHER MONARCHS (Sponsored by Queen Elizabeth I Society).
  11. Call for Papers, Early Modern Women, Religion, and the Body 22-23 July 2014, Loughborough University.
  12. Textual Cultures in Early Modern Europe, Pusey Room, Keble College, 28 September.
  13. THE INTERNATIONAL VOICE IN SHAKESPEARE ON THE LONDON STAGE, Monday 30 September 2013, 18:00-21:00, Performances: 19:45, The Rose Theatre, Bankside, 56 Park Street, London SE1 9AS.
  14. CFP: Manuscript and Early Print Interactions- Special Session, 49th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo May 2014.
  15. Book Announcement. Emotions and Health 1200 – 1700: www.brill.com/emotions-and-health-1200-1700.
  16. The Botany of Empire in the Long Eighteenth Century. Symposium at Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection. Washington, D.C. | October 4–5, 2013.
  17. Call for Papers. “The Problem of Religion: Faith and Agency in History”, Boston College Biennial Conference on the History of Religion March 28-29, 2014.
  18. Japan and Britain, 1613: Parallels and Exchanges SOAS & The British Library, 19-21 September, 2013.
  19. Theatrum Mundi: Latin Drama in Renaissance Europe 12-14 September 2013, Magdalen College, University of Oxford.
  20. Call for Papers:  Revisiting the Debate on Early Modern Salons. The Fourth International MARGOT Conference Barnard College, New York, 18-20 June, 2014. Deadline:  27 September 2013.
  21. HISTORY STUDY DAY with the Who were the Nuns? Project
  22. CFP: Dan Geffrey with the New Poete: Reading and Rereading Chaucer and Spenser – deadline 28th Oct. To be held at University of Bristol, Friday 11th – Sunday 13th July 2014.
  23. Call for Papers. Romance and its Transformations, 1550-1750. June 30th and July 1st, 2014, Chawton House Library, UK. 
  24. CFP. Medieval & Early Modern Cultures of War and Peace: Women and War, Saturday 23rd November 2013 at Homerton College, University of Cambridge.
  25. CFP. ‘I take thee at thy word’: Trust in Renaissance Literature. Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark, 22-24 May 2014.
  26. Fellowships at the the University of Padua.
  27. The Lucy Hutchinson Conference, St Edmund Hall, Oxford, Thursday 28 November 2013.
  28. CFP. A Changing Book Market? Spain and Portugal, 1601-1650. Centre for the History of the Media, University College Dublin, 5-6 June 2014.
  29. Medieval Merchants and Money. A conference at the Institute of Historical Research, London, on 7-8 November 2013 to celebrate the contribution of Professor James L. Bolton to the study of medieval history.
  30. The Blood Conference: Theories of Blood in Late Medieval and Early Modern English Literature and Culture. St Anne’s College, Oxford: 8th –10th, January, 2014.
  31. CFP: Religions of the Book (Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing, Antwerp 2014).
  32. The Queen Elizabeth I Society is proud to announce the keynote speakers for our 2014 annual meeting (to be held in conjunction with the South Central Renaissance Conference, April 3-5).
  33. Fifth Early Modern Symposium: Work in Progress: Bringing Art into Being in the Early Modern Periodwhich will be held at The Courtauld Institute of Art on Saturday 26 October.
  34. Call for Papers: Christopher Marlowe at 450: An Anniversary Special Issue Early Modern Literary Studies (EMLS)
  35. The British Institute of Florence Shakespeare and His Contemporaries, 6th Annual Postgraduate Conference 10th April 2014.
  36. Forthcoming lecture series on Shakespeare and the Classical Tradition by Professor Jonathan Bate FBA CBE, Provost of Worcester College, Oxford,  to be held at the Warburg Institute.

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1. Hugh Trevor-Roper Centenary Conference: Oxford 11 January 2014

HUGH TREVOR-ROPER 1914-2014

A series of papers and discussions to mark the centenary of his birth (on 15 January) and to appraise aspects of his thought and writing. The occasion is arranged by the Dacre Trust and will be held on

                                               SATURDAY 11 JANUARY 2014

                                                         in

                                               CORPUS CHRISTI COLLEGE OXFORD

PROVISIONAL PROGRAMME

10.00 – 11.35 SESSION 1: MID-SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY REVOLUTIONS

Sir John Elliott, ‘Trevor-Roper and “The General Crisis of the Seventeenth Century”’

Blair Worden, ‘The Unpublished Book: The Puritan Revolution’

Mark Greengrass, ‘“Three Foreigners: The Philosophers of the Puritan Revolution”’

COFFEE

11.55 – 1.00 SESSION 2: ERASMIANISM AND ECUMENICALISM

Peter N. Miller, ‘Trevor-Roper and the Erasmian Tradition’

Noel Malcolm, ‘Another Unpublished Book: “The Ecumenical Movement and the Church of England, 1598-1618”’

BUFFET LUNCH IN CORPUS

2.00 – 3.55 SESSION 3: THE SECOND WORLD WAR

Richard Overy, ‘The Last Days of Hitler’

Sir Michael Howard, ‘Trevor-Roper and Wartime Intelligence’

Eberhard Jäckel, ‘Trevor-Roper and Hitler’

Gina Thomas, ‘Trevor-Roper and Himmler’s Masseur’

TEA

4.15 – 4.50 SESSION 4: THE PROSE

John Banville, ‘Trevor-Roper as Prose Stylist’

4.50 – 5.25 SESSION 5: CONCLUDING DISCUSSION

5.30 – 7.15 RECEPTION IN ORIEL COLLEGE OXFORD

to celebrate the centenary, and to mark the publication of ONE HUNDRED LETTERS FROM HUGH TREVOR-ROPER, a selection of his letters to a variety of correspondents written between 1943 and 2001. The book is edited by Richard Davenport-Hines and Adam Sisman and will be published by Oxford University Press. All who have attended part or all of the conference will be welcome at the reception.

ARRANGEMENTS

THE PAPERS AND DISCUSSIONS ARE OPEN TO ALL, AND THOSE WHO COME TO THEM ARE WELCOME TO DO SO FOR EITHER ALL OR PART OF THE PROCEEDINGS. THERE IS NO CHARGE FOR ATTENDANCE OR FOR LUNCH OR REFRESHMENTS, BUT THOSE WISHING TO ATTEND WILL NEED TO GIVE NOTICE. SPACE IS LIMITED AND PLACES WILL BE ALLOCATED FIRST-COME-FIRST SERVED. (A FINAL CLOSING DATE IN DECEMBER FOR ANY REMAINING SPACES WILL BE ANNOUNCED NEARER THE TIME.) THOSE WISHING TO ATTEND SHOULD EMAIL BLAIR WORDEN (WHO WILL BE HAPPY TO ANSWER QUERIES) AT

blair.worden@history.ox.ac.uk.

THEY SHOULD PLEASE (I) SAY WHETHER THEY WILL TAKE LUNCH; (2) SAY WHETHER THEY WILL ATTEND THE RECEPTION; (3) IF POSSIBLE SAY WHETHER THEY EXPECT TO ATTEND ALL THE SESSIONS OR, IF NOT, FOR WHICH OF THEM THEY PLAN TO BE PRESENT.

——-

In the autumn of 2014 a series of Dacre Centenary Lectures will be held, in association with the Oxford History Faculty, in the Examination Schools, Oxford, on Fridays at 5 p.m., provisionally under the title ‘IDEAS AND SOCIETY c. 1600-1800’. The speakers will be ANTHONY GRAFTON, MICHAEL HUNTER, JONATHAN ISRAEL, COLIN KIDD, NOEL MALCOLM, DAVID WOMERSLEY AND BRIAN YOUNG.

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2. London Summer School in Intellectual History

A joint UCL-QMUL venture. Details here: 

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/history/events/london-summer-school

 

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3. Translating Cultures in the Hispanic World, 7-8 November 2013, University of Edinburgh

Location: Teviot Dining Room, Teviot Row, 13 Bristo Square, Edinburgh EH8 9AJ

The dual mission of the radically novel journal Art in Translation consists in challenging the boundaries of conventional art history as practised in Europe and North America, and stimulating thinking about the problems and paradoxes of translation within the art historical discourse. Translating Cultures in the Hispanic World, is the fourth conference hosted by AIT, exploring the interface between the visual arts and theories of cultural translation.

The Hispanic world represents an exceptionally rich and fertile context in which to reflect on the role of translation not only as a vehicle for cultural exchange, the transmission of bodies of knowledge and memory, but also as a means of either asserting or resisting power in order to create something new. Drawing on translation theory, the conference seeks to encourage new ways of thinking about influence, reception, and mis-appropriation. Issues to be addressed include: 

domestication versus foreignization; transgressive modes of translation; translation between different media and contexts; translation-knowledge-power; translation as colonization.

The conference is transhistorical, shifting focus from medieval Spain to the wider Hispanic world in the early modern and modern period. 

Topics to be covered include:

– objects of cross-cultural communication in medieval Spain

– shifts and adaptations in Iberian iconographies

– transfer and transformations of Iberian models of art in Latin America

– cultural representations of social ?others?

– 19th-century photography, the image as transmitter of another presence

– historiography; the reception of Hispanic art.

Thursday, 7 November 2013,  9.00 ? 18.00

Welcome Address

Session 1: Visual Culture and Translation in Medieval Spain

Alejandro García Aviles (Professor of Art History, Universidad de Murcia), ?Lost & found in translation: visual interpretation in medieval astrological iconography?.

Mariam Rosser-Owen (Curator of Middle Eastern collections, Victoria &Albert Museum), ?Islamic ivories in Christian contexts: gift exchange and relic translation?.

Tom Nickson (Lecturer, Courtauld Institute), ?Texts and talismans in medieval Castile?.

Emily Goetsch (PhD Candidate, University of Edinburgh), ?Translating

Cartography: The Mappaemundi of the Beatus Commentary on the Apocalypse?.

Session 2: Spain and the New World

Tom Cummins (Dumbarton Oaks Professor of Pre-Columbian and Colonial Art History; Harvard University) ? The Matter of Metaphor: An Ambiguous Image of Empire in a 16th Century Peruvian Manuscript 

Felipe Pereda (Nancy H. and Robert E. Hall Professor of the Humanities, Johns Hopkins University), ?Translation/translatio: importing sacred images in the w world?.

Maria Judith Feliciano (Independent Scholar, Seattle), ?Towards a theory of Mudejar art? [Mudejar in Mexico]

Friday, 8 November 2013,  9.30 ?  17.00

Session 3: Foreignisation, Domestication, Adaptation?

Marjorie Trusted (Senior Curator of Sculpture, Victoria & Albert

Museum)  ?Melchiorre Caffa?s sculpture of Sta Rosa of Lima. The export of a baroque marble sculpture from Rome to Peru?

Carmen Fracchia (Senior Lecturer in Early Modern Spanish Visual Studies at Birckbeck, University of London), ?Whitening the African body in early modern Spain?

Laura Fernandez Gonzalez (Research Fellow, Institute of Advanced Studies, Edinburgh), ?Madrid and the wider world: domestic architecture and the Spanish empire in the sixteenth century?.

Session 4: Modernity, Memory and Historiography

Andrew Ginger (Professor of Iberian and Latin American Studies, University of Bristol, UK) ?Translating presence: photographing actors?.

Hilary Macartney (Research Associate, University of Glasgow), ?In true fac-simile? The invention of photography and the reproduction of Spanish art?.

Jens Baumgarten (Professor of Art History, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), Brazil), ?Translations of concepts: Brazil, Hanna Levy and the Neo-Baroque?.

Gabriela Siracusano (Director Instituto de Investigaciones sobre el Patrimonio Cultural Universidad Nacional de San Martín (UNSAM), Researcher at the National Research Council, Argentina) , ?Faraway tools for local tales: uses and appropriation of European theories and methods in the construction of a national art history in Argentina?.

Conference fees:

£30 (£15 concessions)

The conference is free for University of Edinburgh students (who will still need to register).

Online Registration and further information here: 

http://www.artintranslation.org/

Dr Laura Fernández-González

Tutor and Part-time Lecturer

Edinburgh College of Art

University of Edinburgh

Tel. 0044 (0) 7726705047

E: laura.fernandez-gonzalez@ed.ac.uk

W:http://edinburgh.academia.edu/LauraFernandezGonzalez

W: http://www.recreatingearlymodernfestivals.com/

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4. CFP – Scientiae 2014, the third annual conference on the emergent knowledge practices of the early modern period (ca. 1450-1750), University of Vienna, 23-25 April 2014.

Keynote Speakers: Thomas Wallnig (University of Vienna) andHoward Hotson (University of Oxford)

CALL FOR PAPERS

The deadline for all abstracts is 15 October 2013

Paper and panel proposals are invited for Scientiae 2014, the third annual conference on the emergent knowledge practices of the early modern period (ca. 1450-1750). The conference will take place on the 23-25 April 2014 at the University of Vienna in Austria, building upon the success of Scientiae 2012(Simon Fraser University) and Scientiae 2013 (Warwick), each of which brought together more than 100 scholars from around the world.

The premise of this conference is that knowledge during the period of the Scientific Revolution was inherently interdisciplinary, involving complex mixtures of practices and objects which had yet to be separated into their modern “scientific” hierarchies. Our approach, subsequently, needs to be equally wide-ranging, involving Biblical exegesis, art theory, logic, and literary humanism; as well as natural philosophy, alchemy, occult practices, and trade knowledge. Attention is also given to mapping intellectual geographies through the tools of the digital humanities. Scientiae is intended for scholars working in any area of early-modern intellectual culture, but is centred around the emergence of modern natural science. The conference offers a forum for the dissemination of research, acts as a catalyst for new investigations, and is open to scholars of all levels.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Intellectual geography: networks, intellectual history, and the digital humanities.
  • Theological origins and implications of the new sciences.
  • Interpretations of nature and the scriptures.
  • Antiquarianism and the emergence of modern science.
  • The impact of images on the formation of early modern knowledge.
  • Genealogies of “reason”, “utility”, and “knowledge”.
  • Humanism and the Scientific Revolution.
  • Paracelsianism, Neoplatonism, and alchemy more generally.
  • Interactions between the new sciences, magic and demonology.
  • The history of health and medicine.
  • Morality and the character of the natural world.
  • Early modern conceptions of, and practices surrounding, intellectual property.
  • Poetry and the natural sciences.
  • The development of novel approaches to cosmology and anthropology.
  • Botany: between natural history, art, and antiquarianism.
  • Music: between mathematics, religion, and medicine.
  • The relationship between early modern literature and knowledge.
  • Advances or reversals of logic and/or dialectic.

Abstracts for individual papers of 25 minutes should be between 250 and 350 words in length. For panel sessions of 1 hour and 45 minutes, a list of speakers (with affiliations), as well as a 500-word abstract, is required. Roundtable discussions or other formats may be accepted at the discretion of the organizing committee. All applicants are also required to submit a brief biography of 150 words of less. Abstracts must be submitted through our online submission form.

If you have any questions, please contact the conference convenor, Vittoria Feola (vittoria.feola@meduniwien.ac.at).

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5. Article submissions invited for Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal  

Invites submissions of articles on the topic of women and gender in the early modern period, 1400-1750. The Journal has now established an award of $1000 for the best article in each issue:

The Forum for Volume 9 will focus on women as patrons and curators.

Topics to be considered may include: women as collectors or patrons of art, music, and literature; women as patrons of social and religious institutions; women as preservers of curiosities and cultural artifacts. Proposals for other topics are welcome.

Please contact the editors at emwj@miami.edu if you are interested in proposing a topic.

Editors:

Anne J. Cruz, Professor of Spanishajcruz@miami.edu

Mary Lindemann, Professor of History mlindemann@miami.edu

Mihoko Suzuki, Professor of English msuzuki@miami.edu

Center for the HumanitiesUniversity of MiamiCoral Gables FL 33124

http://humanities.miami.edu/publications/emwj

To subscribe to the journal, send an email to: gentrup@asu.edu

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6. The Fifteenth Century Conference: Christ Church, Oxford 5th, 6th and 7th September 2013

Thursday 5th September

12.30pm – 2pm Arrival and Registration (Rooms are not available before 12.30pm but if you arrive early you can leave your luggage in the porter’s lodge off St Aldates)

2pm – Welcome (Rowena E Archer)

2.15pm – Professor Chris Given-Wilson: Mayors, merchants, ports and pirates:Henry IV’s urban affinity.

3.30pm Tea

4.15pm  – 6.15pm (Parallel sessions)

Session one: Christian Steer: Monuments in Fifteenth Century London

Kirsten Claiden-Yardley: Tombs and the expression of Noble Identity: Change and continuity 1485-1572

Matthew Ward: The livery collar: politics and identity during the fifteenth century

Session two: Lorraine Attreed: “Men Wage War, Women Make Peace”: Gender and the Expansion of Diplomacy in the Fifteenth Century                                                                                                                                                                   

 Lucia Diaz Pascual: The Bohuns and Family Memory: The Importance of Lineage

 David Russell: Margery Kempe in Lynn Society                     

6.30pm Drinks Reception (Sponsored by the Oxford Centre for Medieval History)

7.00pm Dinner

8.15pm? The Cabot Project (Margaret Condon); The AALT project (Susanne Jenks); the Newport Project (Toby Jones)

Friday 6th September

8am – 9am Breakfast

9am  – 11am (Parallel sessions)

Session one: Sean Cunningham:  “No impediment to work his will…”: manipulation of the law and the reality of justice in the preservation of Henry VII’s kingship

Thomas Penn, The Story of Alum in the reigns of Edward IV and Henry VII

Sam Harper: William Capell: victim of Henry VII’s avarice or architect of his own downfall? 

Session two: Elizabeth Solopova : From popular piety to liturgical ritual: the ownership of the Wycliffte Bible in the 15th century

 Jenni Nuttall:By Royal Appointment? Thomas Hoccleve’s ballades for Henry V

Linne Mooney: London Guildhall Clerks and Middle English Literature.                                             

11am Coffee

11.30am – 1pm: (Parallel sessions)    

Session one: Martin Allen: The English Crown and the coinage, 1399-1485     

Guillaume Sarrat de Tramezaigues: Around the monetary siege of Orleans 1428-29: English stability and French manipulations

Session two: Anthony Gross, Charles III, Duc de Bourbon and the Last of the Yorkists: Portraiture and Mistaken Identity in the Early Renaissance      

David Rundle, There was an Englishman, a Scotsman and a Dutchman or what the scripts of an Italian Humanism owe to the North

1pm Lunch

Afternoon:  Christ Church Upper Library Exhibition: ‘The Long fifteenth century’ &

Martin Andrews &Alan May: Early Printing Press and ‘Print your own Gutenberg Bible Page’ 

4.15pm Tea:

5  – 6.30 pm (Parallel sessions)

Session one: Anne Curry, Simon Harris Guilhem Pépin, Philip Morgan, Paul Spence : ‘The  Gascon rolls project and the End of English Gascony 

Guilhem Pepin, The imposition of Henry IV’s authority in Gascony: The action at Bayonne in 1400

Session two: Eliza Hartrich ‘Urban factions and National Politics in mid-fifteenth century England

Maureen Jurkowski :Were Friars paid Salaries?: Evidence from  Clerical Taxation Records.              

7pm Conference Wine Reception

7.30pm Conference dinner and Dessert

Saturday 7th September

8am-9am Breakfast

9am- 11am

Session one: Andy King: Overlordship or Containment? The Scottish Policies of Henry IV and Henry V.

Susanne Jenks: Exceptions in General Pardons in the Fifteenth Century

Session two: Alison Spedding:A testamentary triptych: the will of a fifteenth-century Hull merchant.                                                

David Harry “This short, dangerous and transitory life”: Death and the English  Nobility, c.1455-85: Nicholas Orme: A New Source for Fifteenth Century History

11am Coffee

11.30am – 12.45pm: Professor Ralph Griffiths: St David’s and its Bishops during the Wars of the Roses

1pm Lunch

2pm conference disperses.

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7. HOMAGE VOLUME FOR DAVID HOOK

Text, Manuscript, and Print in Medieval and Modern Iberia: Studies in Honour of David Hook, edited by Barry Taylor, Geoffrey West, and Jane Whetnall (New York: HSMS, 2013).  xx+432 pp.

We are pleased to announce the imminent publication of a homage volume for David Hook. In this volume sixteen friends and colleagues pay tribute to David Hook’s contribution to Hispanic studies with a collection of articles on the written culture of medieval and early modern Iberia. The volume will be published in November 2013.

The pre-publication price is $35 for USA-based individuals and institutions, and $50 for those based elsewhere. The names of all individuals and institutions who subscribe before 10th August 2013 will appear in the Tabula Gratulatoria.

Cheques, in US dollars, made payable to the Hispanic Seminary of Medieval Studies, should be sent to:

Hispanic Seminary of Medieval Studies

Attn. John O’Neill

613 West 155th St

New York NY 10032

Payment can also be made by credit card (Mastercard, Visa or American Express). Please contact John O’Neill (oneill@hispanicsociety.org) for details.

Please indicate exactly how you would like your name to appear in the Tabula Gratulatoria and provide an e-mail and mailing address.

Contents/Tabla de materias

A. T. Fear, ‘Visigothic Birdspotting’; Roger Wright, ‘The Glossary in Emilianense 24’; Anthony John Lappin, ‘Between the Chisel and the Quill: The Development of the Cult of Peter of Osma during the Middle Ages’; Juan-Carlos Conde, ‘A Neglected Old Spanish Biblical Translation: The “Biblia de Alfonso Ximénez”’; Barry Taylor, ‘Spanish Glosses to Aesop and Prosper of Aquitaine in a Medieval Schoolbook (Lambeth Palace Library, MS 431)’; Jane Whetnall, ‘The Usus Scribendi of the Copyist of the Cancionero de Herberay’; Kirstin Kennedy, ‘“Don Egidio de Roma con el comentario del Tostado en romance para el rey don Juan”: The Spanish Translation of the De regimine principum in the Victoria and Albert Museum (MSL/1950/2463)’; Julian Weiss, ‘Vernacular Commentaries and Glosses in Late Medieval Castile, i: A Checklist of Castilian Authors’; Manuel Hijano Villegas, ‘A Sixteenth-Century Compiler of the Estoria de España: Further Observations on British Library, MS Egerton 289’; David Barnett, ‘Seven Prose Miracles of the Virgin in the Cançoner Vega-Aguiló’; John L. Flood, ‘Amadís in Frankfurt’; Juan Carlos Bayo, ‘The Early Editions of Lazarillo de Tormes and the Problems of their Priority’; Dennis E. Rhodes, ‘Juan Lorenzo Palmireno Bibliographer’; Juliet Perkins, ‘From Brown Ink to Printed Page: The Trajectory of an Eighteenth-Century Opera’; Geoffrey West, ‘Spanish Books in the Old Royal Library: A Preliminary Survey’; Richard Hitchcock, ‘Gallardo and Gayangos: Reflections on Matters Unresolved’.

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8. Ben Jonson’s Epic ‘Foot Voyage’ to Scotland – a Digital Journey

On 8 July 1618 Ben Jonson set out from London to walk to Edinburgh.  Details of his journey were unknown until the recent discovery in Chester Archives of a manuscript account of Jonson’s ‘Foot Voyage’ written by an anonymous fellow walker.  We now have a full picture of the people he met, and the places he visited, as he made his way northwards to York, Durham and Newcastle, then on into Scotland to Edinburgh, finally crossing the Forth for a whistlestop tour of Fife.
Jonson was then at the height of his career, and the welcome given to him on the road was fitting for a man of such fame. At Belvoir Castle, Welbeck Abbey, and other grand houses he was welcomed and banqueted by the nobility and gentry. In market towns and northern cities the civic elite turned out to entertain him. In Scotland, throngs mobbed him on Edinburgh’s High Street as they toasted his journey’s end, while nobles and town dignitaries feasted him in their palaces and houses.

The researchers currently completing an edition of the ‘Foot Voyage’ for publication by CUP next year would like to invite you to join them, and Ben, in a digital recreation of the walk this summer.

•    Jonson’s ‘Foot Voyage’ will be tweeted and posted day by day from 8 July to 5 October 2013:
https://twitter.com/BenJonsonsWalk
https://www.facebook.com/BenJonsonsWalk

•    you can accompany him up the Great North Road, sharing his experiences of historic sites and the tales he was told, the colourful characters he met, plenty of generous hospitality, and lots of great British summer weather

•    you can find out more about the walk and the project on the linked website and blog: http://bit.ly/BJWblog

Feel free to join us – and please pass this email on to anyone who might also be interested!

This project has been undertaken by James Loxley and Anna Groundwater (Edinburgh) and Julie Sanders (Nottingham), and is supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

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9. Call for book proposals: Women & Gender in the Early Modern World

The study of women and gender offers some of the most vital and innovative challenges to current scholarship on the early modern period. For more than a decade now, Women and Gender in the Early Modern World has served as a forum for presenting fresh ideas and original approaches to the field. Interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary in scope, this Ashgate book series strives to reach beyond geographical limitations to explore the experiences of early modern women and the nature of gender in Europe, the Americas, Asia, and Africa. We welcome proposals for both single-author volumes and edited collections which expand and develop this continually evolving field of study.

In addition to works focused on early modern Europe, we are eager for submissions about women in non-western cultures, the colonial Americas, and the role of women and gender in science, magic and technology.

To submit a proposal, or for more information, please contact: Erika Gaffney, Publishing Manager, egaffney@ashgate.com

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10. Call for Papers, 49th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, MI, 8-11 May, 2014 ELIZABETH I and OTHER MONARCHS (Sponsored by Queen Elizabeth I Society).

Our panel in 2014 will consider Elizabeth in relation to the other monarchs–those who preceded her, those who were her contemporaries, and perhaps even those who followed her, both in England and abroad. It is supposed that Elizabeth has famously compared herself to Richard II, and we know that she openly drew on the Tudor legacy in her speeches and political strategies. What elements of Elizabeth’s queenship are derived from or are conceived in opposition to the ruling styles or politics embraced by certain medieval monarchs as well as Elizabeth’s contemporaries abroad? What elements of her own rule are imitated or criticized by the later kings and queens? What can we glean from Elizabeth’s diplomatic relationships with the other monarchs? We invite papers  exploring the ways Elizabeth’s queenship was shaped in relation to other queens and kings.

Please email the abstracts (about 300 words) to Anna Riehl Bertolet ariehl@auburn.edu no later than September 15, 2013. Along with your abstract, please submit a completed  Participant Information Form (found on the Congress website, but also attached to this email for your convenience).

Hope to see you at Kalamazoo!

With best wishes,

Anya

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11. Call for Papers, Early Modern Women, Religion, and the Body 22-23 July 2014, Loughborough University

Plenary speakers: Professor Mary Fissell (Johns Hopkins) and Dr Katharine Hodgkin (University of East London)

With public lecture by Alison Weir (evening of 22 July, Martin Hall Theatre): ‘“The Prince expected in due season”: The Queen’s First Duty’

This two-day conference will explore the response of early modern texts to the relationship between religion and female bodily health. Scholars have long observed that understandings of the flesh and the spirit were inextricably intertwined in the early modern period, and that women’s writings or writings about women often explored this complex relationship. For instance, how did early modern women understand pain, illness, and health in a religious framework, and was this different to the understanding of those around them? Did women believe that their bodies were sinful? And were male and female religious experiences different because they took place in different bodies?

We invite proposals that address the relationship between religion and health, and the spirit and flesh, with a focus on female experience in any genre in print or manuscript. Genres might include medical, literary, religious, autobiographical, instructive, and rhetorical writings.

Topics might include, but are not limited to:

Methods of recording or maintaining bodily and spiritual health

The function of religion/faith in physiological changes (e.g. pregnancy/childbirth/nursing/menstruation)

Illness, providence, and interpretation

Suffering as part of religious experience and conversion

Spiritual melancholy, madness, demonic possession, or witchcraft

The physical effects of prophesising/preaching

Chastity and religious life

Spiritual and physical births/reproductive tropes

Ensoulment and pregnancy

The miraculous or martyred female body

The body and sin

Uses of the Bible in medical treatises

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers, complete panels, or roundtable discussions. Suggestions for discussions on pedagogical approaches to teaching the above topics are also welcome.

Please send abstracts of 300 words for 20-minute papers, or longer proposals for panels or roundtables, to Rachel Adcock, Sara Read, and Anna Warzycha at emwomen@lboro.ac.uk by 31st January 2014.

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 12. Textual Cultures in Early Modern Europe, Pusey Room, Keble College, 28 September.

This one day colloquium will explore the cultural implications of the production, dissemination and use of texts, whether manuscript or printed. Focussing on early modern England, France, and Italy, papers will discuss the relationship between image and text; cultures of production, including concerns behind publishing such as censorship, self-fashioning and marketing; how texts moved within and across borders; and how early modern readers engaged with the texts they encountered.

Speakers include: Sara Apetrei; Ian Archer; James Ambrose; Sara Barker; Heather Dalton; Nicola Gardini; Michael Hawcroft; Cristina Neagu; Jason Peacey; Tracey Sowerby; and Tiffany Stern.

For further details please see the attached poster.

To register, or to make any enquiries please contact tracey.sowerby@keble.ox.ac.uk by 15 September.

Registration is £16 waged and £10 students/unwaged. This includes a buffet lunch, coffee & afternoon tea.

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13. THE INTERNATIONAL VOICE IN SHAKESPEARE ON THE LONDON STAGE, Monday 30 September 2013, 18:00-21:00, Performances: 19:45, The Rose Theatre, Bankside, 56 Park Street, London SE1 9AS

PROGRAMME

18:00: Welcoming Speech

Enza De Francisci (Convenor)

Session I: Papers by Departments at University College London

18:05: Chris Stamakatis (English)

‘Some rare noteworthy object in thy travel’: Shakespeare’s Italy and Early Modern Travel Writing

18:25: Enza De Francisci (Italian, SELCS)

Giovanni Grasso: The Other Othello in London

18:45: Lily Kahn (Hebrew and Jewish Studies)

Linguistic Aspects of the First Hebrew Shakespeare Translations

19:05: Geraldine Brodie (Dutch, SELCS)

Shakespeare and Surtitles: Toneelgroep’s Roman Tragedies in London

19:25: Round-Table Discussion

Translating, Transporting and Transposing Shakespeare

Chair: Rene Weis (English)

Session II: Performances of Shakespeare

19:45: WERE I HUMAN based on The Tempest

Adapted, Directed and Illustrated by Terry D’Alfonso

Read by Diana Berriman and Simonetta Allder

In Memory of Giorgio Strehler

20:05: Macbeth and the Physical Theatre (WOH Productions

Adapted by Anthony Khaseria and Manuela Ruggiero

Directed by Manuela Ruggiero

Produced by Carolina Artegiani

20:25: Post-Show Discussion

Adapting Shakespeare Today

Chair: Florian Mussgnug (Italian)

20:45: Closing Remarks

Enza De Francisci 

This conference is generously supported by the Mazzini Garibaldi Charitable Foundation

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14. CFP: Manuscript and Early Print Interactions- Special Session, 49th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo May 2014 

In the first few centuries after the advent of print, manuscript and print cultures existed side by side. Paper proposals are invited on any aspect of manuscript and early print interactions in any language, on any kind of text (i.e, literary, medical, scientific).

Papers might consider, but are no means limited to:

–        Attitudes to, and anxieties about, early print in comparison with manuscripts

–        Manuscripts copied from prints

–        Joint manuscript and print codices

–        The influence of manuscript mis-en-page on printing practices and vice versa

–        The cultural cachet attached to manuscripts after the arrival of print

–        Surreptitious manuscript copies of seditious or private texts after the advent of print

Please send abstracts of no more than 250 words to mary.wellesley.09@ucl.ac.uk, by September 14th, 2013.  

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15. EMOTIONS AND HEALTH, 1200-1700. Edited by Elena Carrera. SMRT, 168. Leiden/Boston: BRILL, 2013. ISBN 9789004250826

For all interested in the history of the emotions, medical  history,  and medieval and early modern European cultural history:

CONTRBUTORS: Nicole Archambeau, Elena Carrera, Penelope Gouk, Angus Gowland, Nicholas E. Lombardo, William F. MacLehose, Michael R. Solomon and Erin Sullivan.

  Emotions and Health, 1200-1700 examines theological and medical

  approaches to the ‘passions’ as alterations affecting both mind and

  body. It focuses on sorrow, fear and anger, on constructions of the

  melancholic subject, and on the effects of music on health.

  For more information see www.brill.com/emotions-and-health-1200-1700

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16.  The Botany of Empire in the Long Eighteenth Century. Symposium at Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection. Washington, D.C. | October 4–5, 2013

This two-day symposium will bring together an international body of scholars working on botanical investigations and publications within the context of imperial expansion in the long eighteenth century. The period saw widespread exploration, a tremendous increase in the traffic in botanical specimens, significant taxonomic innovations, and horticultural experimentation. We will revisit these developments from a comparative perspective that will include Europe, the Ottoman Empire, Africa, Asia, and the Americas.

Main themes for discussion are global networks of plant discovery and transfer; the quest for medicinal plants and global crops such as ginseng, tea and opium; the economies of gift, trade, patronage, and scientific prestige in which plants circulated; imperial aspirations or influences as reflected on garden design; and visual strategies and epistemologies.

The symposium will coincide with the fiftieth anniversary of the Rare Book Room at Dumbarton Oaks, and will feature an exhibit of botanical works from our collections.

Registration for the symposium is now open. For more information you can visit the website, click on the links below, or write to BotanySymposium@doaks.org.

Registration

Program

Confirmed speakers include Sahar Bazzaz (College of the Holy Cross); Daniela Bleichmar (University of Southern California); Deniz Çalış-Kural (Istanbul Bilgi University); Sarah Easterby-Smith (University of St. Andrews); Ian Glenn (University of Cape Town); Rachel Koroloff (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign); Shigehisa Kuriyama (Harvard University); Colin McEwan (Dumbarton Oaks); Amy Meyers (Yale Center for British Art); Miranda Mollendorf (Harvard University); Carla Nappi (University of British Columbia); Romita Ray (Syracuse University); Bianca Rinaldi (University of Camerino); and Anatole Tchikine (Dumbarton Oaks).

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17. Call for Papers. “The Problem of Religion: Faith and Agency in History”, Boston College Biennial Conference on the History of Religion March 28-29, 2014

The History Department of Boston College invites papers and panels for its fifth Biennial Conference on the History of Religion to be held on March 28-29, 2014. In recent years, scholars have increasingly considered how religious institutions, beliefs, or practices challenge our conceptions of the past while also recognizing that religion is but one of a number of forces that interact, collide, and impel human history. As we try to determine when religion has been important in human history and when it has not, we grapple with understanding how internal matters of faith provoke and direct acts of human agency, manifest in the exercise of devotional practice, institutional power, and other arenas. Finally, scholars of religion are considering the most appropriate ways to contemplate, research, and write about faith, belief, and agency during what some intellectuals argue is a secular age. We will consider the possibilities and boundaries of using religion as a lens for understanding agency in human history.

We welcome proposals for individual papers and full panels from both established scholars and graduate students in all disciplines on topics from the medieval period to the present that touch upon the question of religion (in Christian and non-Christian forms) and agency in history. The geographic scope is broadly defined. Suggested themes include, but are not limited to, the role of religious institutions, practices, and beliefs in:

· church-state relations           · political violence

· the law and public policy      · religious thought

· habits and practices            · the challenges of historical method

Individual paper proposals should include a 300-word proposal, paper title, and one page c.v. Panel proposals for two to three presenters should include a 250-word panel abstract (including panel title), a 300-word proposal for each individual paper (including paper title), and a one page c.v. for each presenter. Deadline for submission is October 4, 2013.

Please submit your proposals to the Conference Committee at bchistoryofreligion@gmail.com<mailto:bchistoryofreligion@gmail.com>. Further conference details including a schedule, registration form, and travel information will be available at a later date at http://www.bc.edu/schools/cas/history/about/religion_conference.html.

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 18. Japan and Britain, 1613: Parallels and Exchanges SOAS & The British Library, 19-21 September, 2013.

The Conference will address the history of Japan and Britain in and around the year 1613. Both countries were undergoing massive cultural, religious and political transformations at the time, and it is instructive to look at their respective systems of restructuring and recreation in parallel and comparatively. 

Moreover, Japan and Britain directly encountered each other for the first time in 1613, with arrival of an English East India Company vessel, the Clove, bearing letters and gifts from King James for the Shogun. The conference will therefore also address issues of encounter and communication.

This event takes place on the exact 400th anniversary of this momentous encounter, for it was on 19 September 1613 that the English received reciprocal presents from the Shogun (which are extant), and on 21st that they departed Edo with great rejoicing. The conference is a major element in Japan400, a series of commemorations scheduled for across the UK and Japan to mark this landmark year. 

The Conference is sponsored by the Percival David Academic Fund and supported by the Great Britain Sasakawa Foundation 

All welcome. Registration not necessary

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 19. Theatrum Mundi: Latin Drama in Renaissance Europe 12-14 September 2013, Magdalen College, University of Oxford

Organized by the Society for Neo-Latin Studies in tandem with the Centre for Early Modern Studies, Oxford, the conference will bring together scholars working on early modern Latin drama. The conference will include a staged reading of an Oxford college play translated into English by Elizabeth Sandis (Oxford) and directed by Elisabeth Dutton (Fribourg), both researchers on the Early Modern Drama at Oxford (EDOX) project. An exhibition of institutional drama manuscripts and early printed books will be on display in St John’s; participants will also have the chance to visit the Archive of Performances of Greek and Roman Drama and to participate in a pedagogical forum, ‘Teaching Classical Drama’, in the Classics Faculty. The keynote speakers are: Thomas Earle (Oxford), Alison Shell (UCL), and Stefan Tilg (Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Neo-Latin Studies, Innsbruck).

The programme and registration details can be found at: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/ren/snls/events/theatrummundi/ Some postgraduate bursaries are available. The conference has been generously funded by the MHRA, CEMS, Society for Renaissance Studies, and the Association for Manuscripts and Archives in Research Collections. Please contact Sarah Knight (Leicester) with any questions (sk218@le.ac.uk).

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20. Call for Papers:  Revisiting the Debate on Early Modern Salons. The Fourth International MARGOT Conference Barnard College, New York, 18-20 June, 2014. Deadline:  27 September 2013.

Organizers: Julie Campbell, Anne Larsen, and Diana Robin

We would like to organize a panel on “Revisiting the Debate on Early Modern Salons.”

The place of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century salons and salon sociabilité in the production of culture has been a topic of renewed interest for literary historians for well over a decade now. As we and other scholars have begun to take into consideration women’s leadership and patronage in such contexts, in Italy, France, and England, the notions about what constitutes women’s empowerment regarding the production of literary culture, especially, but also their influence on social, political, and religious issues (such as marriage, education, the law, and religious choices) have come under new scrutiny.

 
Salon-style sociabilité was already in practice in sixteenth-century Italy (with gatherings referred to as ridotti, cenacoli, or veglie) and France (the cénacles and other gatherings in the hôtels particuliers of noble and royal hostesses, as well as coteries and circles in major cities such as Lyon and Poitiers) long before the architectural form and term salon caught up with it in seventeenth-century France. In England the Sidney/Wroth/Russell/Herbert circle exercised a profound influence on sociability.

The MARGOT conference provides the opportunity to examine our contemporary views of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century salon culture in Europe. We would be interested in papers on any of the following:

–salon sociabilité and women’s influence on cultural production, religious controversies, or political contexts.

–consideration of the longue durée of salon sociabilité.

–the international influence on salon sociabilité not only in France, but in Italy, Spain, or England. 

Please send abstracts of no more than 250 words and a one-page C.V. by Friday 27 September 2013, by email attachment, to each of the following:

Julie D. Campbell                    Anne Larsen                            Diana Robin

Professor of English                Professor of French                 Scholar-in-Residence,

Easter Illinois University        Hope College                          Newberry Library

jdcampbell@eiu.edu               alarsen@hope.edu                  

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21. HISTORY STUDY DAY with the Who were the Nuns? Project

Find out how you can use the database and other project resources for family and local history

Saturday 2nd November 2013

Salford Diocesan Archives, at St Augustine’s Church, Grosvenor Square, Oxford Road, Manchester M15 6BW

10.00 a.m. coffee, 10.30 a.m. first talk

Dr Caroline Bowden and Dr James Kelly talking about the project and how it can be used to find North West families

Dr Janet Hollinshead, Choosing their future: women in the Blundell family in early modern Lancashire

Peter J Tyldesley, The Tyldesleys and their faith in the 17th and 18th centuries

There will be a chance to see the archives at lunchtime with Father David Lannon, the archivist and to try out the database. 

There is no cost for the day: refreshments will be available during breaks. Lunch can be purchased locally. All welcome, but please confirm attendance in advance with Dr Caroline Bowden from whom further details can be obtained. c.bowden@qmul.ac.uk

The archives are ten minutes walk from Oxford Road station.

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22. CFP: Dan Geffrey with the New Poete: Reading and Rereading Chaucer and Spenser – deadline 28th Oct. To be held at University of Bristol, Friday 11th – Sunday 13th July 2014.

Confirmed Plenary Speakers:                                            

Prof. Judith Anderson, Indiana University, Bloomington

Dr. Helen Barr, Lady Margaret Hall, University of Oxford

Prof. Helen Cooper, Magdalene College, University of Cambridge

An international conference at the University of Bristol, Friday 11th – Sunday 13th July 2014.  Supported by the Department of English and the Centre for Medieval Studies.

There is a persistent discussion between scholars of the medieval and early modern periods about how both periods are conceptualised and about the interrelations between them.  How can reading, or rereading, the connections between these two poets contribute to this discussion?  Chaucer is customarily read as a poet of the High Middle Ages, whose valorisation of the vernacular had a profound influence on the poetry of subsequent centuries.  Spenser is often read as a poet of the High Renaissance for whom continuity with the past (literary and historical) was a paramount issue.  What are the connections between these poets and how can they help to shape revisionist discussions about the periodisation of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance?  This conference aims to reread the connections between Chaucer and Spenser, in the light of recent critical methodologies and reformulations of historical continuity and difference.  The organisers hope to publish a selection of the resultant papers as a single volume, so the following questions seek to elicit contributions that collectively have a sense of coherence, without constraining what contributors wish to discuss. 

  • How has the relationship between Chaucer and Spenser been read and how can it be re-read?
  • How do these two poets together help us periodize / deperiodize / reperiodize the medieval and the early modern?
  • What kind of continuum do they share?  Is their relationship continuous, radically other, both or neither?  Can we reconceptualise descriptions of poetic similarity or difference through discussing Chaucer and Spenser together?
  • Can we think of their connection in terms of anticipation as well as influence?
  • What can we learn about the phenomenon of intertextuality by rereading the connections between these two poets?
  • Does Spenser present us with one Chaucer or many?  How has this affected later versions of Chaucer?
  • Do these two poets take analogous approaches to the task of making poetry?
  • How do earlier fifteenth- and sixteenth-century readings and adaptations of the Chaucerian canon affect Spenser’s readings of it?
  • How might a greater variety of critical approaches reveal new connections between the poets?  (e.g. ecocriticism, posthumanism, studies of material cultures, studies of the digital humanities, cognitive approaches, histories of the emotions, disability studies)
  • How does Chaucer imagine his poetic followers?  What would Chaucer think of Spenser?

Please send 300 word proposals for 20 minute papers to chaucerspenser@gmail.com, including 5-10 keywords highlighting the content of the paper.  The deadline for receipt of proposals is Monday, 28th October 2013. 

For updates and further information, please see the conference website

Dan Geffrey with the New Poete

or, follow us on twitter

@chaucerspenser

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23. Call for Papers. Romance and its Transformations, 1550-1750. June 30th and July 1st, 2014, Chawton House Library, UK. 

Keynote Speakers:

Professor Ros Ballaster, Oxford University

Professor Emerita Mary Ellen Lamb, Southern Illinois University

With a public keynote by Professor Nandini Das, Liverpool University

As a genre, romance is defined by transformation: it is both a recurrent motif within romance and a characteristic of a form that has itself been transformed over the centuries and in different locations. But romance maintains a degree of formal and thematic integrity, as well as its appeal with different generations of readers and across social and cultural boundaries. This conference will explore the appropriation and transformation of romance in Britain and beyond between 1550 and 1750, as writers adopted and rewrote the motifs, storylines, characters, and formal elements of the genre. In doing so, it will bring into dialogue the different ideas about and critical approaches to the genre that are developing our understanding of the significance of romance within historical periods traditionally considered in isolation from one another, including the Renaissance, the early modern period and the eighteenth century.

We welcome proposals for papers on any aspect of the way romance has been adopted and transformed between 1550 and 1750. Potential areas of investigation include but are not limited to:

Romance and…

commonplace books, conduct books, drama, poetry (including epic), letters, life writing, novels and other forms of prose fiction, political activism, political writing, print and, manuscript culture, scientific writing, social interactions, translation. 

The deadline for 500 word abstracts is December 31st, 2013

Please send abstracts to Alice Eardley: a.eardley@soton.ac.uk or Julie Eckerle: ecker014@morris.umn.edu

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24. CFP. Medieval & Early Modern Cultures of War and Peace: Women and War, Saturday 23rd November 2013 at Homerton College, University of Cambridge 

This one day conference is part of an ongoing annual academic series focusing upon the many and various medieval and early modern cultural investments in armed combat and conflict resolution. This interdisciplinary conference explores these cultural investments with particular reference to questions of the role of women in terms of both warfare and the construction of peace. It is envisaged that delegates will be addressing this subject from a number of disciplinary perspectives, and presentations on the following subjects relating to the medieval and early modern periods would be particularly welcome: 



•    the representations of martial women across a range of media, especially but not exclusively those Thomas Heywood chose as ‘the most worthy women in the world’ in 1640 (e.g. the Biblical Deborah and Judith, the Pagan Bunduca and Penthisilea, and the Christian, Elpheda, Margaret (wife of Henry VI) and Elizabeth I)

•    writings by women who discuss their experiences of war;


•    representations of women’s experience in medieval conflicts, as non-combatants and combatants, victims and aggressors, subjects and authors. In particular, this panel invites contributions on Joan of Arc and/or her literary legacy; Christine de Pizan and women’s writings on the ethics of war; or any other subject concerned with women’s experience of medieval warfare and/or its ethical/literary representation;


•    the way women are represented on stage in plays that deal explicitly with their experience of war; this session will relate to a performance of Jane Lumley’s Iphigeneia that will be staged on the evening of the conference.

These and other related subjects will be considered for presentation at this conference. Abstracts of no more than 200 words should be sent to the conference organizers, Professor Geoff Ward (gw355@cam.ac.uk) and Professor Marion Wynne-Davies (m.wynne-davies@surrey.ac.uk) no later than Friday 27th September. All abstracts should include the proposer’s name, title, mailing address, email address, institutional affiliation, student/employed status. Please note that there will be four panel sessions: of these some will require papers (no longer than 2000 words) to be circulated beforehand by the panel chair in order to facilitate discussion, while others will ask panel members to address key questions circulated by the panel chair.

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25. CFP. ‘I take thee at thy word’: Trust in Renaissance Literature. Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark, 22-24 May 2014

What qualities compose trust and confidence in the Renaissance?  What signs call it into question?  This seminar seeks to identify points of congruence and contention in sixteenth and seventeenth century notions of trust and how they might be betrayed. From the stage Machiavel who discloses his plans to the audience to the kinsman who pledges his fealty, or the lover who exchanges his faithful vow, how did trust differ across such different domains as religious and political life or familial relations?  It is hoped that papers will cross a range of genres including early modern poetry, prose, and drama, as well as major and minor authors. The intended outcome will be to publish suitable papers in a special issue of Textual Practice.

This seminar will be part of the interdisciplinary MatchPoints Conference 2014 at Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark, 22-24 May 2014 (www.matchpoints.au.dk).  Plenary speakers include Robert Putnam (Harvard University), Eric Uslaner (University of Maryland), Gerd Achenbach (Lessing-Hochschule zu Berlin, Philosophische Praxis), Mikael Rostila (Stockholm University), Alison Findlay (Lancaster University), Svend Andersen (Aarhus University),Cheryl Mattingly (University of Southern California), Sverre Raffnsøe (Copenhagen Business School).

Organised by Joseph Sterrett

Please send 150 word proposals to engjs [at] hum.au.dk by 15 January 2014.

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26. Fellowships at the the University of Padua.

The University of Padua has launched a program of fellowships aimed at non-Italian post-doc students needing to spend a period of time in Padua for their research. These fellowship work very much like the Marie Curie fellowships, but are open to students from all over the world. They can apply starting from September.

All the best,
Alessandra
***
Alessandra Petrina
Associate Professor of English Literature
Università degli Studi di Padova
Dpt Studi Linguistici e Letterari
via Beato Pellegrino, 26
35136 Padova
Italy
 
alessandra.petrina@unipd.it

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 27. The Lucy Hutchinson Conference, St Edmund Hall, Oxford, Thursday 28 November 2013

Lucy Hutchinson is well known to seventeenth-century historians and literary scholars as the author of Memoirs of the Life of Colonel Hutchinson, a classic biography which sets the momentous life of her husband, a committed Puritan, republican and regicide, against the wider backdrop of the English Civil War and Restoration. This work, and a compelling though fragmentary autobiography, have been more or less continually in print since their publication from manuscript in 1806. Only recently, however, has the scale and range of her interests been recognized. Like her contemporary – and political rival – Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle, Hutchinson aspired to the new European model of the woman intellectual, and translated Lucretius’ De rerum natura, the most passionately anti-religious text of antiquity. From a radically different perspective, she later composed Order and Disorder, a major Biblical poem on a parallel subject to Milton’s Paradise Lost. Underpinning her later works was an exceptional engagement with contemporary Latin and English theological writings. Many fundamental questions about her life and writings have yet to be addressed, and this will be the first ever conference to discuss them. It will bring together many scholars who are working on a new edition of her collected works and others with an interest in seventeenth-century literature, politics and women’s writing. Speakers will include Penelope Anderson, Martyn Bennett, Mark Burden, Elizabeth Clarke, Alice Eardley, Jonathan Gibson, Crawford Gribben, Erica Longfellow, David Norbrook, Elizabeth Scott-Baumann, and Blair Worden.

Registration: http://www.cems-oxford.org/conferences/lucy-hutchinson.

 Inquiries: hutchinson.conference@ell.ox.ac.uk

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 28. CFP. A Changing Book Market? Spain and Portugal, 1601-1650. Centre for the History of the Media, University College Dublin, 5-6 June 2014.

The marketplace for print in Spain, Portugal and the New World witnessed many pro-found transformations in the first half of the seventeenth century. Overall, there was a dramatic increase in the output of the presses, while patterns of production shifted sig-nificantly from what had been set in the preceding century. The period witnessed the growth of an increasingly vibrant news culture. Appetites for recreational reading also began to change, seen not least in the number of printed plays available for purchase. Though attracting far less scholarly attention, perhaps the most noteworthy develop-ment of all was the maturing use of the press to service government and the legal pro-fession. This conference will focus broadly on the industry and culture of print, and ask just how the Iberian book world of the first half of the seventeenth century com-pares with what had gone before and what would follow.

The conference will take place in Dublin on the 5-6 June 2014. It will coincide with the launch of volumes 2 and 3 of the UCD Iberian Book Project which cover this peri-od. Confirmed speakers include two of the most distinguished figures in Golden Age Studies, Professor Don Cruickshank and Professor Henry Ettinghausen.

Papers are warmly invited from scholars from any academic background interested in the industry or culture of the Iberian book. The principal and preferred language of the conference will be English. However, papers may be delivered in Spanish or Portu-guese if pre-circulated. Papers on less well explored areas of study such as legal print or illustration are especially welcome.

The Call for Papers is now open. Potential contributors are asked to submit a title and brief outline of their paper (250 words) to Dr Alejandra Ulla Lorenzo (alejandra.ullalorenzo@ucd.ie) before Friday 29 November 2013.

The Conference has been made possible thanks to the generous support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

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29. Medieval Merchants and Money. A conference at the Institute of Historical Research, London, on 7-8 November 2013 to celebrate the contribution of Professor James L. Bolton to the study of medieval history.

For more than forty years Jim Bolton has been based at Queen Mary, University of London, where is currently Professorial Research Fellow, directing the Borromei Bank Research Project. His published work includes important and influential contributions to the economic and social history of the middle ages, and in particular to our understanding of the money supply and the operation of credit, international banking, the impact of the Black Death, the activities of Italians and other alien groups in London, and relations between the city of London and the Crown. He was for many years one of the convenors of the IHR’s Late Medieval Seminar.

The conference will present current research from more than twenty scholars working on a range of themes connected with Jim’s work, including keynote lectures by Professor Caroline Barron (RHUL) and Professor Phillipp Schofield (Aberwystwyth).

The full programme (attached) and booking details are available at http://events.history.ac.uk/event/show/11159. ‘Early bird’ booking rates are available until 30 September. We would be very grateful if you could pass this on to colleagues and students who may be interested in attending. 

Martin Allen (Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge)

Matthew Davies (Centre for Metropolitan History, Institute of Historical

Research)

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30. The Blood Conference: Theories of Blood in Late Medieval and Early Modern English Literature and Culture. St Anne’s College, Oxford: 8th –10th, January, 2014

Convenors: Laurie Maguire, Bonnie Lander Johnson, Eleanor Decamp

Blood in the medieval and early modern periods was much more than simply red fluid in human veins. Defined diversely by theologians, medics, satirists and dramatists, it was matter, text, waste, cure, soul, God, and the means by which relationships were defined, sacramentalised and destroyed. Blood was also a controversial ingredient in the production of matter, from organic and medical to mechanical and alchemical.

Between the fourteenth and seventeenth centuries debates about the nature and function of blood raised questions about the limits of identity, God’s will for his creatures, science’s encounter with the self, and the structure of families and communities, and its impact was felt in artistic constructions on stage, in print, and on canvas.This two and a half day conference will gather early modern and medieval scholars from English, History, Art History and Medical History, to  ask: ‘What is Renaissance blood?’

Plenary addresses by

Frances Dolan (UC Davis), Patricia Parker (Stanford), Helen Barr (Oxford) and Elisabeth Dutton (Fribourg).

Discussions will cover a range of topics including blood and satire, blood and revenge, blood and gender, blood and genre, queer blood, royal blood, blood and wounding, William Harvey, blood and race, blood on the stage, blood and witchcraft, blood and alchemy, bloodlines, blood and sacrifice, blood and friendship, blood and disease, blood and automata.

The Blood Conference will feature a professional production of The Croxton Play of the Sacrament directed by Elisabeth Dutton, and a session led by David Fuller, with the help of Oxford singers, on early sacramental music and Eucharistic blood. Wellcome Trust archivists will also be offering a session on blood material in their collection. More speakers are now warmly invited. We are particularly interested in interdisciplinary papers, and those with an emphasis on Art History and Medical History. But any innovative approaches to historical blood are most welcome!

Please send a 500 word abstract to Micah Coston at thebloodconference@gmail.com bySeptember 9th 2013.

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31. CFP: Religions of the Book (Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing, Antwerp 2014)

Apologies for any cross-posting. The theme for next year’s conference on authorship, reading, and publishing is ‘religions of the book’, and they invite proposals on a wide variety of uses of books in religious contexts: 

conference website: http://www.sharp2014.be/index.html

 *Conference theme: Religions of the Book*

Next to books, literature and print heritage, religious diversity is an important part of Antwerp’s identity. From the middle of the sixteenth century onwards the city was the scene of ferocious battles between Calvinism and Catholicism in the 16th and 17th century. Jews and Muslims have also been an integral part of Antwerp’s past and both communities are visibly present in the city today. To illustrate the shared heritage of the three ‘religions of the Book’ that left their mark on the city, Antwerp will host a prestigious double exhibition from September 2014 to January 2015. One part will run in the Museum aan de Stroom (MAS) orbiting around ‘Sacred Places and Pilgrimage’, the other will take place in the Hendrik Conscience Library and will focus on ‘Sacred Books’.

Although SHARP 2014 will kick off this major double exhibition and alludes explicitly to the three ‘religions of the Book’ – Judaism, Christianity and Islam – the actual scope of the conference is much broader and may include the relationship between any religion(s) and the production, distribution and consumption of books and texts, in whatever form (manuscript, printed or digital), in any region or any period of time.  Religious and anti-religious censorship, iconography, spiritual literature, preaching practices are only a few of the many possible approaches. Moreover, participants to SHARP’s 22nd annual conference are invited to explore the more metaphorical dimensions of its central topic. We warmly invite proposals relating the theme to bibliophilia (a religion devoted to the book?), cult books, the role of authors as high priests, reading as a trance-provoking practice, the sacral status of the printed book in Enlightenment ideology, the strong belief in the freedom of the press…

One may even consider the cultural apocalypse some pessimists see ensue the on-going process of digitization, or, inversely, the imminent salvation promised by internet and tablet gurus. Cutting-edge proposals, dealing with other aspects of book history and print culture are also welcome, but priority will be given to papers addressing the conference theme.

Deadline and further requirements

Papers presented at SHARP conferences are expected to offer original scholarship and to go beyond descriptive accounts of archival or textual materials. Speakers should outline the wider implications of research presented. Both the thesis being tested and the conclusions drawn should be clearly stated in the proposal. SHARP prides itself on attracting members from a variety of disciplines, who communicate in a language accessible to diverse specialists. Proposals are to indicate how the paper (or panel) sheds light on some issue, principle, or practice of book history that clearly addresses SHARP’s interests. The conference is open to both individual presentations and complete panel proposals (with three speakers and a chairperson). Each speaker is allotted 20 minutes for the presentation and 10 minutes for discussion. All sessions last 90 minutes.

Paper proposals should be no more than 400 words, are submitted in English and accompanied by a brief biography. Panel proposals consist of three individual 400-word proposals, the required biographies and an introduction. The deadline for submissions (both individual proposals and

sessions) is 30 November 2013. The program committee will send notifications of its selection no later than 15 February 2014. All participants, including chairs and speakers, must be members of SHARP in order to participate. Registration for the conference is a prerequisite.

For information on membership, please visit the SHARP website at www.sharpweb.org.

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32. The Queen Elizabeth I Society is proud to announce the keynote speakers for our 2014 annual meeting (to be held in conjunction with the South Central Renaissance Conference, April 3-5).

Retha Warnicke is Professor of History at Arizona State University and author of several works, including Wicked Women of Tudor England: Queens, Aristocrats, Commoners (2012).  Her presentation is titled “Tudor Consorts:  The Politics of Royal Matchmaking, 1483-1543″

Jane Donawerth is Professor of English at the University of Maryland whose published works include Conversational Rhetoric: The Rise and Fall of a Women’s Tradition, 1600-1900 (2011).  The title of her presentation is “Elizabeth I and the Marriage Crisis, John Lyly’s Campaspe, and the Shaping of Court Drama”

Please see the SCRC website for further information on conference registration and paper proposals:http://www.scrc.us.com/cfp_scrc2014.shtml

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33. Fifth Early Modern Symposium: Work in Progress: Bringing Art into Being in the Early Modern Periodwhich will be held at The Courtauld Institute of Art on Saturday 26 October.

Further information and programme here: http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/researchforum/events/2013/autumn/oct26_FifthEarlyModernSymposium.shtml

Ticket/entry details:
£16 (£11 students, Courtauld staff/students and concessions). Book online here: http://courtauld-institute.digitalmuseum.co.uk

With very best wishes,

Research Forum

The Courtauld Institute of Art

Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN

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34. Call for Papers: Christopher Marlowe at 450: An Anniversary Special Issue Early Modern Literary Studies (EMLS)

2014 will be a significant year of early modern literary anniversaries. The 450th anniversary of Shakespeare’s birth is certain to attract a significant degree of popular and scholarly attention, but his is not the only milestone of note; 2014 will also mark the 450th anniversary of the birth of Shakespeare’s exact contemporary, Christopher Marlowe. In order to recognise this occasion, we invite contributions to a special anniversary issue on Marlowe, which will be published in 2014. We welcome contributions on any aspect of Marlowe studies, but topics to be addressed might include:

  • Theoretical approaches to Marlowe based upon recent developments in areas such as gender, race, geography, sexuality, etc.
  • The place of Marlowe biography
  • Marlowe and editing/textual criticism
  • Marlovian afterlives
  • Marlowe in performance
  • Marlovian genres
  • Marlowe’s influence
  • Marlowe and early modern repertory
  • Marlovian poetics

Abstracts should be submitted to Dr Dan Cadman (d.cadman@shu.ac.uk) or Dr Andrew Duxfield (a.duxfield@shu.ac.uk) by 1 November 2013. We anticipate a deadline of July 2014 for full submissions.

Early Modern Literary Studies (ISSN 1201-2459) is an open-access refereed journal serving as a formal arena for scholarly discussion and as an academic resource for researchers in the area. Articles in EMLS examine English literature, literary culture, and language during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries; responses to published papers are also published as part of a Readers’ Forum. Reviews evaluate recent work as well as academic tools of interest to scholars in the field. EMLS is committed to gathering and to maintaining links to the most useful and comprehensive internet resources for Renaissance scholars, including archives, electronic texts, discussion groups, and beyond. For further details see: http://extra.shu.ac.uk/emls/emlshome.html

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35. The British Institute of Florence Shakespeare and His Contemporaries, 6th Annual Postgraduate Conference 10th April 2014.

 The British Institute of Florence’s annual Shakespeare Graduate Conference is a one-day interdisciplinary and bilingual English-Italian forum open to PhD students and researchers who have obtained their doctorates within the past 5 years. This year’s conference theme is Shakespeare and His Contemporaries: Forms of Nationhood. Contributions are welcomed on the topic of national identity and representations of Elizabethan England in the literary production of William Shakespeare and his contemporaries (playwrights, poets and others) across different disciplines (not limited to):

literature, comparative studies, history, art history, cinema and theatre history.

Candidates are invited to send a description of their proposed contribution according to the following guidelines:

•       the candidate should provide name, institution, contact info, title and a short abstract of the proposed contribution (200-300 words for a 20-minute paper), explaining the content and intended structure of the paper, and including a short bibliography.

•       abstracts are to be submitted by Wednesday 30 October 2013 by email tosnovello@britishinstitute.it.

•       all proposals will be blind-vetted. The list of selected papers will be available by the end of November 2013.

•       each finished contribution is to last no longer than 20 minutes andis to be presented in English (an exception will be made for Italian candidates of departments other than English, who can present papers in Italian). Candidates whose first language is not English will need to have their proposals and final papers checked by a mother-tongue speaker.

•       participants will be asked to present a final draft of the paper aweek before the Conference.

•       participants must be members of the Harold Acton Library, choosingbetween a 3, 6 or 12 month membership. Memberships can be paid for on the day of conference. For details on Library Membership rates and benefits please visit the websitewww.britishinstitute.it.

•       The British Institute cannot reimburse any travel or accommodation expenses.

•       papers submitted will be considered for publication in the onlineproceedings edition of the ‘Shakespeare and His Contemporaries Graduate Conference (see the websitewww.britishinstitute.it  for previous volumes of the proceedings).

Deadline for abstracts Wednesday 30 October 2013 For more information contact Sofia Novello atsnovello@britishinstitute.it

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36. Forthcoming lecture series on Shakespeare and the Classical Tradition by Professor Jonathan Bate FBA CBE, Provost of Worcester College, Oxford,  to be held at the Warburg Institute.

Full details are given below and a poster can be printed off at: http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/fileadmin/images/events/Lectures/Gombrich_lectures.pdf We would be grateful if you could forward this email to any of your contacts who may be interested. We would also appreciate it if you could display the poster on your department notice board. 

Princeton University Press and The Warburg Institute, School of Advanced Study, University of London
E. H. GOMBRICH LECTURES ON THE CLASSICAL TRADITION 2013

ANCIENT STRENGTH
Professor Jonathan Bate FBA CBE, Provost of Worcester College, Oxford

The E. H. Gombrich Lectures is an annual series of Lectures on Aspects of the Classical Tradition, named in honour of Professor Sir Ernst Gombrich FBA OM, former Director of the Warburg Institute and Professor of the History of the Classical Tradition, University of London. The Lectures will be held at the Warburg Institute and will be published by Princeton University Press.

The inaugural series of lectures on Shakespeare and the Classical Tradition will be given by Professor Jonathan Bate, FBA CBE, Editor of Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus, co-editor of The Complete Works, The RSC Shakespeare, author of Shakespeare and OvidThe Genius of ShakespeareSoul of the Age (and many other books) and co-organiser of the 2012 British Museum Exhibition, Shakespeare: Staging the World.

Thursday 10 October 2013, 5pm – Tragical Comical Historical Pastoral: Shakespeare and Classical Genre

Thursday 17 October 2013, 5pm – The Madness of Hercules: Shakespeare and Classical Psychology

Thursday 24 October 2013, 5pm – ‘I will read politic authors': Shakespeare and Classical Political Thought

Each Lecture will be followed by a Reception.

Attendance is free of charge and pre-registration is not required.

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