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Newsletter 45

By Alexander Samson, on 3 April 2014

1. CECS Colloquium to celebrate the work of Harriet Guest: Saturday 17th May 2014 ‘Sound Words, Strange Tattoos and Unbounded Attachments: Celebrating the Works of Harriet Guest’ at the King’s Manor, organised by Emma Major.  For more info: http://www.york.ac.uk/eighteenth-century-studies/

2. Call for Proposals: Attending to Early Modern Women: It’s About Time. June 18-20, 2015, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. A detailed description of the conference and the call for proposals is now available at:www.atw2015.uwm.edu Proposals for workshops that address the conference themes may now be submitted, to atw-15@uwm.edu. Deadline: September 30, 2014.

 3. Kingston Shakespeare Seminar, Spring 2014, by Johann Gregory. SHAKESPEARE AND LAW. For more info: http://cardiffshakespeare.wordpress.com/2014/02/06/kingston-shakespeare-seminar-spring-2014/.

4. The Place of Spenser / Spenser’s Places, Dublin, 18-20 June 2015. The Fifth International Spenser Society Conference. The International Spenser Society invites proposals for their next International Conference, to be held in Dublin, Ireland. The conference will address Spenser’s places – domestic, urban, global, historical, colonial, rhetorical, geopolitical, etc. – but also the place of Spenser 
in Renaissance studies, in the literary tradition, in Britain, in Ireland, in the literary and political cultures of his own moment. Abstracts should be submitted directly to the conference website: 
www.spenser2015.com. The closing date for submissions is 15 September 2014. We also invite proposals for poster-board demonstrations of relevant digital and other projects. http://www.english.cam.ac.uk/spenseronline/iss/ 

5. CFP ‘Missionaries, Materials and the Making of the Modern World’ in Cambridge 15-17 September. For more information contact Dr Chris Wingfield cw543@cam.ac.uk, Senior Curator (Archaeology) Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology,University of Cambridge. To submit an abstract email, ga343@cam.ac.uk.

6. Applications are invited for one-month Visiting Fellowships at Chawton House Library (CHL) to be taken up between October 2014 and the end of August 2015. Deadline for applications: 7 April 2014. For more information please see www.chawtonhouse.org  

7. Registration is now open for our annual workshop, which will take place on Saturday 10 May 2014.  This year’s title is ’Uncapable of her freedom’: Trading as a woman in the late 17th-Century City of London.  We are delighted to announce that our keynote speaker is Professor Laura Gowing, Professor of Early Modern British History at King’s College, London. All queries should be directed to Yvonne Noble, workshop organiser, at : yn@noblesse.demon.co.uk  www.womensstudiesgroup.org.uk

8. Announcing the Fifth Annual FEMINIST ART HISTORY CONFERENCE at American University in Washington, DC, Friday, October 31 – Sunday, November 2, 2014. CFP on subjects spanning the chronological spectrum, from the ancient world through the present, to foster a broad dialogue on feminist art-historical practice. To be considered for participation, please provide a single document in Microsoft Word. It should consist of a one-page, single-spaced proposal of unpublished work up to 500 words for a 20-minute presentation, followed by a curriculum vitae of no more than two pages. Please name the document “[last name]-proposal” and submit with the subject line “[last name]-proposal” to fahc5papers@gmail.com. Submission Deadline: May 15, 2014. Invitations to participate will be sent by July 1.

9. Sixteenth Century Studies Conference in New Orleans, Oct 16-19, 2014: “Did Early Modern Women Have a Youth?” I would love to hear from others who would like to offer papers on girls and young women as yet unmarried to God or man, on their activities, their letters and other expressions, their aspirations, their senses of constraint or autonomy, their collaboration with other family members, female and male, and whatever else you may have discovered. I myself will propose a paper on the seduction of young women as these culpable efforts turn up in the criminal courts of Rome. Please respond to Libby Cohen at: ecohen@yorku.ca with a paper title, 150-word abstract and a one-page CV.

10. We are accordingly issuing a call for editors of NeoLatin texts to be included in the DLL. If you are interested in this prospect, please contact Dr. Michael Ullyot, RSA’s representative to the DLL, at ullyot@ucalgary.ca.

11. Call for Papers: 18th Century and Romantic Studies Graduate Conference: “Bending the mind”: Attention and Instruction in the Long Eighteenth Century 26th-27th April, 2014 Faculty of English, University of Cambridge. http://www.english.cam.ac.uk/research/eighteenth/?page_id=26

12. University of Sussex and British Academy: Early Career Research Network Symposium:  Editing April 11th, 2014 at the University of Sussex. contact Simon Davies (S.F.Davies@sussex.ac.uk) for more information. http://www.sussex.ac.uk/cems/newsandevents/events?id=23367

13. Call for papers – Teaching Shakespeare in Japan. Articles are short, 500-1000, words but we welcome a range of formats: interviews, vox pops, lesson plans, reviews and storyboards. Please do get in touch with ideas (approx. 150-word abstract) or questions ator sarah.olive@york.ac.uk by April 30th, It is envisaged that accepted articles would be submitted by August 30th 2014. Past issues are freely available to read online or download athttp ://www . britishshakespeare . ws/education/teaching-shakespeare/

14. Announcing a new series from Ashgate Publishing Company, Cultures of Play, 1300-1700. Series Editor:  Bret Rothstein, Indiana University. The series publishes original research written in English, including both single author volumes and collections of original essays. Proposals should take the form of either 1) a preliminary letter of inquiry, briefly describing the project; or 2) a formal prospectus including:  abstract; brief statement of critical methodology, table of contents; sample chapter; estimate of length; estimate of the number and type of illustrations to be included; a c.v. Please email your letter or proposal to the Ashgate contact for this series: Erika Gaffney, Publishing Manager, egaffney@ashgate.com

15. We invite proposals for papers that consider any aspect of the life, writings, and activities of Cheke and the other members of the group surrounding him at Cambridge and their impact on Tudor England. Topics might include (but are not limited to): art and architecture, communities and networks, education and universities, gender and society, government and political reform, humanism and scholarship, ancient and vernacular languages, mathematics and the natural sciences, religious controversy and reform, translation and rhetoric. We especially welcome proposals from PhD students and other early career academics and expect to have bursaries available to cover some of the expenses of attending the conference. Please send proposals (250 words) by 1 May 2014 to Alan Bryson (a.bryson@sheffield.ac.uk), John McDiarmid (diarmid@starpower.net), or Fred Schurink (fred.schurink@northumbria.ac.uk).

16. Keble College, Oxford is looking for a fellow to teach and research Reformation history and theology: http://bit.ly/1fZC2uW

17. The Place of Spenser / Spenser’s Places. Dublin, 18-20 June 2015. The Fifth International Spenser Society Conference  www.spenser2015.com

18. Heythrop College is celebrating its 400th anniversary with a two-day conference at the Institute of English Studies, Senate House, University of London. The conference will reflect on the history of the College and explore the nature and character of Jesuit education over the past 400 years. For further details, full programme and registration please see For the Greater Glory of God and the More Universal Good: http://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/Heythrop400. Early registration is essential to ensure a place.

19. Call for Papers: Special Issue of Shakespeare on “Shakespeare and Jonson”. Please send expressions of interest or abstracts for papers of 6500-7000 words to james.loxley@ed.ac.uk and fionnuala.oneill@soton.ac.uk by Friday 16th May 2014.

20. The long-standing Reformation Studies Colloquium will set up its tents in Cambridge in September. It always is an exciting event, and the lineup of keynote speakers this year is fantastic: Alec Ryrie, Ben Kaplan, and Mary Laven. If you wish to participate, please see the Call for Papers on the website (http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/research/conferences/reformation-studies), or don’t hesitate to email reformationstudies@hist.cam.ac.uk with any questions. Hoping to welcome many of you in Cambridge!

21. Lecturer in Shakespeare and Renaissance Literature at UCL. If you have any enquiries regarding the vacancy or the application process, please contact the Departmental Administrator, Mr. Stephen Cadywold, s.cadywold@ucl.ac.uk. Further information about the Department is available on www.ucl.ac.uk/english.

22. Eleventh International Milton Symposium. Call for Papers. The Eleventh International Milton Symposium will be held at the University of Exeter, England, 20-24 July, 2015. Proposals for papers (500 words maximum, preferably in the form of an email attachment) should be submitted by 10 June 2014 to Karen Edwards (k.l.edwards@exeter.ac.uk) and Philip Schwyzer (p.a.schwyzer@exeter.ac.uk), English Department, Queen’s Building, 
Exeter University, Exeter EX4 4QH, UK. 

23. Editing Tudor Literature. Newcastle University, 10-11 May 2014. If you would like to attend please contact Jennifer Richards (Jennifer.Richards@ncl.ac.uk) by May 1st at the very latest.

24. Liminal Time and Space in Medieval and Early Modern Performance: Call for Papers
5th-7th September 2014, University of Kent. Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words to Dr Sarah Dustagheer (s.dustagheer-463@kent.ac.uk) and Dr Clare Wright (c.wright-468@kent.ac.uk) by Monday 14th April 2014.

25. Early Modern Studies Journal is soliciting essays for a special volume whose subject concerns women’s writing and its connection to women’s work, broadly interpreted. Essays might focus more particularly on either the writing or the work of women, or they might show the intricate ways in which writing and work are related in the female sphere of the 16th and 17th centuries. Though the journal primarily focuses on the literature and culture of England, we encourage articles concerning women’s literary and material production in other geographical contexts in the early modern period, though essays need to be written in English. You can visit our website for more information: http://www.uta.edu/english/emsjournal/.

Newsletter 44

By Alexander Samson, on 5 February 2014

Newsletter 44

1. Early Modern Exchanges Seminar Series. Wednesday 12 February 2014, 4.30pm, Foster Court 307, SELCS Common Room. Historical Geography and the Early Modern. http://www.ucl.ac.uk/eme/seminars

2. Call for Papers, March 1st, “Godly Governance: Religion and Political Culture in the Early Modern World, c. 1500-1750″, a conference at the University of York (UK), 27-28 June 2014. For more info: http://godlygov2014.wordpress.com

3. Call for Project Participants for Religion, Art and Conflict: disputes, destruction and creation, a project which consists of two events at The Courtauld Institute of Art in London: the first, a one-day workshop on Friday 20 June 2014; the second, a 1.5 day conference on Friday 5 and Saturday 6 December 2014. The deadline for the Call for Project Participants is Monday 17 March 2014. Please submit your CV with a short statement (300-500 words) summarising your research interests and reasons for wanting to join the research group to Dr Michael Carter: michael.carter@courtauld.ac.uk

http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/researchforum/index.shtml

4. CFP “Dramatizing Penshurst”. For more info: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/dramatizing-penshurst/

5. Speaking and Writing Aztec (Nahuatl). Inaugural Lecture: Speaking & Reading Aztec: http://events.sas.ac.uk/ilas/events/view/15296/Inaugural+Lecture%3A+Speaking+%26+Reading+Aztec

6. “Global City: On the Streets of Renaissance Lisbon” at the Wallace Collection from Thursday 6th November, 2014 to Sunday 15th February, 2015.
http://www.wallacecollection.org/collections/exhibition/107

7. Toledo as a Centre of Translation in the 12th &13th Centuries. UCL Translation in History Lecture Series on Thursday 6 February from 6-7.30 pm in Lecture Theatre G6, UCL Institute of Archaeology. For further details and registration, please see http://www.ucl.ac.uk/translation-studies/translation-in-history/current-series/#termtwo

8. The third annual John Rule Lecture will be held on 12 March at 6 pm in Lecture Theatre C on Avenue Campus at the University of Southampton. ‘The Curious Case of Mademoiselle de Choiseul’ by Professor Catriona Seth, professor of 18th-century studies at the Université de Lorraine and World Leading Researcher at Queen’s University (Belfast). Please RSVP to Sandy White, sw17@soton.ac.uk.

9. The Northern Renaissance Seminar in association with CREME:
http://creme.lancs.ac.uk/ ‘To set the word against the word’: new directions in early modern textual analysis’, Lancaster University, Saturday 22 February 2014,
Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences Building, Meeting Room 3. There is no registration fee. Please contact Liz Oakley-Brown e.oakley-brown@lancaster.ac.uk to register.

10. CFP at The Renaissance English Text Society for 2014 SCSC (Sixteenth Century Society Conference) to be held on 16-19 October in New Orleans, Louisiana. Please send a 150-word abstract and a one-page CV to me at maryelamb@aol.com and to Anne Lake Prescott ataprescot@barnard.edu by 10 March. E-mail attachments in Microsoft Word are preferred.

11. ‘Teresa of Avila 1515-2015 Mystical Theology and Spirituality in the Carmelite Tradition.’ For more information and call for papers see: www.smuc.ac.uk/inspire

12. AHRC Funded Doctoral Studentships in the Arts and Humanities: Department
of English and Creative Writing, University of Roehampton. For more details on the TECHNE application process, see
http://www.roehampton.ac.uk/Courses/Graduate-School/TECHNE-AHRC-Doctoral-Training-Partnership/ The deadline for applications is 19 February 2014.

13. AHRC Network: Voices and Books, 1500-1800. First workshop in Manchester. For more info: http://research.ncl.ac.uk/voicesandbooks/

14. CFP for the fourth Tudor and Stuart Ireland Conference in NUI Maynooth on 29 and 30 August 2014. The closing date for proposals is Friday, 11 April 2014. Please see our website, www.tudorstuartireland.com or contact the organisers at 2014@tudorstuartireland.com for further information.

15. Shakespeare 450 Conference. Paris, April 21-27, 2014. Fore more info: http://www.shakespeareanniversary.org/shake450/fr/

16. Sub-Faculty of Spanish, University of Oxford, Research Seminars, Hilary Term 2014. All seminars, unless otherwise indicated, will take place at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in Room 3, Taylor Institution. https://weblearn.ox.ac.uk/access/content/group/26e38a26-f27e-4c07-a0ac-7a8aec607d1c/seminars/spanish/spanish-seminars-ht14.pdf

17. CFP The Roots of Nationalism: National Identity Formation in Early Modern Europe, 1600-1815. Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands
22-23 January 2015. Paper proposals (max 300 words) should reach the conference committee by 1 April 2014 by email: nations@let.ru.nl. The committee invites panels
or proposals on any topic relevant to this conference’s theme: the forging of national identities in early modern Europe between 1600 and 1815. Conference website: http://www.ru.nl/rootsofnationalism

18. Centre for Early Modern and Medieval Studies at the University of Sussex
(CEMMS) Spring Semester: All Tuesday evening papers start at 6pm in the English Social Space (B274). For more info: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/cems/newsandevents/events or email Prof Margaret Healy (m.j.healy@sussex.ac.uk)

19. Harvard University research seminar organized as part of the Getty Foundation’s Connecting Art Histories initiative: “From Riverbed to Seashore: Art on the Move in Eastern Europe and the Mediterranean in the Early Modern Period (2014-2015)”, will be led by Professor Alina Payne of Harvard University. The application deadline has been extended to March 1. Please send applications to the attention of Elizabeth Kassler-Taub, Department of History of Art and Architecture, Harvard University, ekassler@fas.harvard.edu. For any queries, contact  Elizabeth Kassler-Taub or Professor Alina Payne (aapayne@fas.harvard.edu).

20.  ‘Illustration and Identification in the History of Herbal Medicine’ 10.30 am–4.30 pm, Wednesday 18th June 2014, Jodrell Lecture Theatre, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 3DS, UK. Advance registration required: Contact nicky@nickywesson.com For further information, see http://events.history.ac.uk/event/show/12436

21. “For the Greater Glory of God and the More Universal Good”: A Celebration of the 400th Anniversary of the Foundation of  Heythrop College and of the Jesuit Educational Tradition’, Institute of English Studies, Senate House, University of London, 19 – 20 June 2014. For further information, programme and registration, visit http://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/Heythrop400

22. Sheffield Centre for Early Modern Studies. To book a place on the masterclasses, please contact the SCEMS research fellow, g.schwartzleeper@shef.ac.uk

23. CFP ‘Adapting, Performing and Reviewing Shakespearean Comedy in a European Context.’ Interdisciplinary Symposium at the Institute of Modern Languages Research (IMLR), London, Thursday 12 and Friday 13 June 2014. Please send 200-word abstracts with a 50-word biography by 15th February 2014 to the following address: shakespeare.comedy.2014@gmail.com

24. Preliminary Announcement and Call for Papers: The Fifteenth Century Conference, University of Aberdeen,4th, 5th, 6th September 2014. Those wishing to offer papers are invited to send details by e-mail to j.armstrong@abdn.ac.uk or to Dr Jackson Armstrong, History, Crombie Annexe, Meston Walk, University of Aberdeen, Old Aberdeen, AB24 3FX. Please send: Title of proposed paper; Abstract (c. 200 words); Full name and professional title (viz. Professor, Dr, Ms, & c.); Postal address and e-mail; Institutional affiliation and relevant status (viz. permanent / fellowship / research student / & c.); Anticipated availability (e.g. if only one day is feasible). Closing date 1 March 2014.

25. CFP ‘Error and Print Culture, 1500-1800’: A one-day conference at the Centre for the Study of the Book, Oxford University, Saturday 5 July 2014. Proposals for 20-minute papers are welcome on any aspect of error and print, in Anglophone or non-Anglophone cultures. Please email a 300-word abstract and a short CV to Dr Adam Smyth (adam.smyth@balliol.ox.ac.uk) by 14 April 2014.

26. CFP “Themes of Polemical Theology Across Early Modern Literary Genres.” For more info: http://polemicaltheology.wix.com//themes-across

Newsletter 43

By Alexander Samson, on 22 November 2013

1. Wednesday, 20 November: Professor Michele Bacci (University of Fribourg), The Invention of a Holy Site: the Lateran Church in the Middle Ages, 5.30pm, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre. Admission: Free and open to all. Organised in association with the Centre for Hellenic Studies at King’s College London.

Thursday, 21 November, Art History and Sound Lecture Series: Deborah Howard (University of Cambridge), Architecture and Music in Renaissance Venice, 6.00pm, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre.

http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/researchforum/calendar.shtml

 

2. Women’s Study GroupSeminar

Senate House, Malet Street, University of London on Saturday 30 November at 2.00pm. Room 234, second floor.

www.womensstudiesgroup.org.uk

The seminar is open to all. The format is informal and friendly, with lively debate and an opportunity to network with others.

 

3. The seventh annual student conference of the Birkbeck Early Modern Society will be held on Saturday 15 February, with the theme of ‘Vice and Virtue in any aspect of life in the Early Modern Period ( 1500-1800)’.

Call for papers deadline is 6 December. For more info: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/history/current-students/societies-student-groups/early-modern-society

 

4. Call for papers: Colloquium on Dialects in Italian Literature and Culture, 1500-1800. Dartmouth Colle (Hanover, NH), September 4-6, 2014. Please submit an abstract of 300 words, a short bio, and your contact information (name, affiliation, and email address) to Nancy Canepa Nancy.L.Canepa@Dartmouth.edu and Courtney Quaintance Courtney.Quaintance@Dartmouth.edu by March 1, 2014.

 

5. The London Renaissance Seminar. Please join us for an informal discussion of religion on the early modern stage. Dr. Alison Shell and Dr. Emma Smith will lead discussion starting from Shakespeare’s Unreformed Fictions/(OUP, 2013) by Dr. Gillian Woods Friday 29th November 2013 6 -7.30pm, Birkbeck,43 Gordon Square Birkbeck College, University of London. Contact s.wiseman@bbk.ac.uk

 

6. CFP for Writing Britain: 500-1500. University of Cambridge, Faculty of English, 30 June – 2 July 2014. Please visit our conference web site in order to submit an abstract (300 words or fewer) for a twenty-minute paper. Please send your abstract by 20 February 2014. Abstracts from postgraduate students are welcome and graduate rates will be provided. For further information please visit the website

http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/english/news/conferences/writing_britain

 

7. Tuesday 19th November 2013, Gordon Room (G34), Ground Floor, Senate House, University of London, 5:15pm: Reclothing the churches:  sensory religious re-investment in the early modern English parish church, Jude Jones (Southampton)

http://www.victoriacountyhistory.ac.uk/learning/seminar

 

8. The archives of the Irish College in Paris are in the process of being digitised, and some very interesting documents are already available:

http://primary-sources.eui.eu/website/collection-irish-college-paris

 

9. The Irish Jesuit Archives is now online: http://www.jesuitarchives.ie/

 

10. Deadline for the first Renaissance Society of America and Text Creation Partnership (TCP) Article Prize in Digital Renaissance Research awards http://www.rsa.org/?page=Awards

 

11. GEMELA invites abstracts for its biennial conference in Lisbon, Portugal, September 8-10, 2014. http://www.gemela.org

 

12. Antiquity in a World of Change: Celebrating the 500th Anniversary of the Birth of Sir Thomas Smith (1513-77). To book, please email Executive Assistant Jola Zdunek (admin@sal.org.uk) or call 020 7479 7080. Please contact the Communications Officer Renée LaDue (rladue@sal.org.uk) if you have any questions.

 

13. Call for papers: Defending the Faith Conference taking place 15-17 September, 2014. It is being held in celebration of the 450th anniversary of the English translation of John Jewel’s Apology of the Church of England. Abstracts of 500 words by 1st March, 2014 to Angela Ranson ransoang@gmail.com or Sarah Bastow s.l.bastow@hud.ac.uk

 

14. CREMS study day in the liturgy in history. Please see the following for details of this exciting event: http://liturgyinhistory.wordpress.com/

 

15. Early Modern Jarman 2014 event: 1 February 2014, Anatomy Theatre & Museum, King’s College London. Call for papers http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/shakespeare_bulletin/calls.html

 

16. Dürer and Warburg: Interpreting Antiquity. A two-day conference which will take place at The Warburg Institute (Friday 22 November) and The Courtauld Institute of Art (Saturday 23 November.)

Book online: http://ci.tesseras.com/internet/shop

Further information: http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/researchforum/events/2013/autumn/nov22-23_DurerandWarburgInterpretingAntiquity.shtml

 

17. Please find below details of Renaissance Art History seminars, lectures and related events taking place in London in November.

Book online: http://ci.tesseras.com/internet/shop

 

18. Saint Louis University, a Catholic, Jesuit institution dedicated to student learning, research, health care, and service is seeking applicants for a full time tenure-track position at the level of assistant or associate professor to begin Fall 2014 in Early Modern European History. All applications must be made online at http://jobs.slu.edu and should include a cover letter and curriculum vitae.

 

19. Call for papers for the 2014 ACLA Annual Meeting on “Capitals” hosted by NYU in New York City, March 20-23rd.  The deadline for submission of papers is November 15th (midnight, Pacific Standard Time). To submit a paper visit the ACLA website here: http://acla.org/acla2014/propose-a-paper/

 

20. Thomas Browne Seminar, 2014 ‘Classical Philosophers in 17th century English Thought’ – Call for papers, Wed 28th May 2014. Abstracts by 15th December (c. 250 words) to: Kevin Killeen, kevin.killeen@york.ac.uk

This symposium is part of a diffuse and ongoing Thomas Browne Seminar that has digressed quite far:  http://www.york.ac.uk/english/news-events/browne/

 

21. ‘Time and Early Modern Thought’ – Call for papers. Sat 10th May 2014 – York Minster Old Palace Library. Please send abstracts (c. 250 words) by Dec 15th to Kevin Killeen kevin.killeen@york.ac.uk and Liz Oakley-Brown e.oakley-brown@lancaster.ac.uk

 

22. Heather Dalton (University of Melbourne), ‘A Sulphur-crested Cockatoo in fifteenth-century Mantua: Rethinking symbols of sanctity and patterns of trade’

5.15pm on Tuesday 12 November in the Roy Griffiths Room, Keble College, Oxford. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/rest.12042/abstract

 

23. Northern Renaissance Roses Seminar, 2014 ‘Time and Early Modern Thought’ Call for papers. Sat 10th May 2014 – York Minster Old Palace Library

Please send abstracts (c. 250 words) by Dec 15th to Kevin Killeen kevin.killeen@york.ac.uk and Liz Oakley-Brown e.oakley-brown@lancaster.ac.uk http://www.york.ac.uk/crems/

 

24. New collection of essays about the influence of ladies-in-waiting within early modern European courts: http://www.brill.com/products/book/politics-femalehouseholds

 

25. 16 November 2013: HERA-funded collaborative research project “Encounters with the Orient in Early Modern European Scholarship” with a one-day symposium on The Teaching and Learning of Arabic in Early Modern Europe. The symposium will take place at the Leemanszaal, Rijksmuseum van Oudheden, Leiden.

Speakers are Asaph Ben-Tov (Erfurt), Alexander Bevilacqua (Princeton), Mordechai Feingold (Caltech), Mercedes García-Arenal (Madrid), Aurélien Girard (Reims) and Arnoud Vrolijk (Leiden). Please find the detailed programme here: http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/fileadmin/images/events/colloquia/2013-14/Learning_and_Teaching_of_Arabic_Leiden__2_.pdf

 

26. 2014 BSA Fellowship Program Announcement Application Deadline: December 15, 2013 http://bibsocamer.org/fellows.htm

 

27. THE EDITION AS ARGUMENT, 1550-1750. 16-17 July 2014, Queen Mary, University of London. Call for Papers Abstracts should be no more than 300 words long and should be sent to Harriet Phillips h.phillips@qmul.ac.uk and Claire Bryony Williams c.b.williams@qmul.ac.uk by 1st December 2013.

 

29. Registration is now open for The Blood Conference, an interdisciplinary forum to discuss early modern and medieval theories of blood. Wednesday 8th to Friday 10th January 2014, St Anne’s College, Oxford. Find out more and book in for the conference: www.thebloodproject.net Join the conversation on Twitter: @bloodproject

 

30. Call for Papers: ‘Early Modern Soundscapes’, Thursday 24th – Friday 25th April 2014, Bangor University. To include the Society for Renaissance Studies Annual Welsh Lecture, given by Professor Jennifer Richards (Newcastle University) and Professor Richard Wistreich (Royal Northern College of Music). Abstracts of no more than 250 words for twenty-minute papers, or proposals for panels comprising three papers, are to be sent to Rachel Willie (r.willie@bangor.ac.uk) by December 1, 2013.

 

31. Second Annual Postgraduate Renaissance Symposium; call for papers – deadline 4 November 2013. Event to take place: Saturday 18 January 2014, The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN. Please send proposals of no more than 250 words and your academic CV by 4 November 2013 to renaissanceartandmusic@gmail.com

 

32. CFP for conference on perceptions of pregnancy from medieval to modern times at the University of Hertfordshire, UK, next July. http://perceptionsofpregnancy.wordpress.com/

 

33. November 21, 2013 Wolfgang Adam, Universitat Osnabruck, Faire reviver Montaigne. Contact Concetta Cavallini : concetta.cavallini@uniba.it and Giovanna Devincenzo: giovanna.devincenzo@uniba.it

34. Call for Papers: Drama and Pedagogy. Swiss Association of Medieval and Early Modern English Studies 2014 Conference, 12-13 September, 2014, University of Fribourg, Switzerland.

For further details, please see our website: http://samemes2014.wordpress.com/

For further information on the Swiss Association of Medieval and Early Modern English Studies, please visit http://www.unil.ch/samemes

 

35. Migration and Mission in Christian History (3-5 April, Oxford), deadlines 21 October 2013 and 20 January: http://www.history.ac.uk/ehsoc/content/migration-and-mission-christian-history-joint-asch-ehs-conference

 

Reading, Writing and Religion 1660-1830 (7 December, Queen Mary, London), deadline 25 October: http://writingandreligion.wordpress.com/

 

Religions of the Book (17-21 September, Antwerp), deadline 30 November: http://dighum.ua.ac.be/ocs/index.php/sharp/sharp2014/schedConf/cfp

 

Collegial Communities in Exile (19-20 June, Limerick), deadline 17 January:  http://colleges2014.wordpress.com/

 

Gender and Sexuality in the Reformation (9-11 April Westminster College, Cambridge), deadline 31 January: http://reformationstudies.org/2013/09/10/gender-and-sexuality-in-the-reformation/

 

Reassessing Women’s Travel Writing, 1660-1900 (10-12 July, Chawton House Library, Hampshire), deadline 1 March: http://www.chawtonhouse.org/?p=57800

 

Godly Governance: Religion and Political Culture in the Early Modern World (27-28 June, York), deadline 1 March: http://godlygov2014.wordpress.com/

 

36. Call for Papers: Godly Governance: Religion and Political Culture in the Early Modern World, c. 1500-1750. University of York (UK), 27th-28th June 2014.

Please send abstracts and panel proposals to Christine Knaack, Jonas van Tol and Emma Kennedy by 1 March 2014 at godlygov2014@gmail.com.

 

For more information, please visit http://godlygov2014.wordpress.com/.

 

37. Speaking with the Dead: Histories of Memory in Sacred Space. 1-2 November at Exeter Cathedral and the Devon and Exeter Institution. Please contact Professor Philip Schwyzer (p.a.schwyzer@ex.ac.uk) by Friday 25 October to register for the symposium. Those wishing to attend the public lecture by Professor Douglas Davies only should contact Sarah Grainger (sarah.grainger@exeter-cathedral.org.uk).

‘The Many Faces of a Mediaeval Fenland Church’, a study day to be held at St Clement’s Church, Outwell, on 26th April 2014. Places are limited and early booking is encouraged. http://www.mbs-brasses.co.uk/Outwell_Study_Day_-_26_April_2014.pdf

 

38. Open University Book History Research Group seminars (nine Monday evenings from November to May) at Senate House, London. The topic is Paper, Pen and Ink: Manuscript Cultures in Early Modern England and the full programme is at http://www.open.ac.uk/Arts/english/book-history/paper-pen-ink.shtml

For further information, please contact the organiser, Jonathan Gibson (jonathan.gibson@open.ac.uk).

 

39. 26 November, 2013, Ruth Ahnert, ‘Social Networking – Tudor Style’, Senate House, 5pm: http://blogs.history.qmul.ac.uk/digitalhumanities/

 

40. A Conference on Early Modern Identity at Homerton College, University of Cambridge, Saturday 23rd November, 10.30 – 17:00 http://www.homerton.cam.ac.uk/events/women_and_war

 

41. The First Annual Bardies Awards. bardies@theshakespearestandard.com

For more info: http://www.theshakespearestandard.com/?s=global+shakespeare

Newsletter 42

By Alexander Samson, on 15 October 2013

 

  1. Lecture series on Shakespeare and the Classical Tradition by Professor Jonathan Bate FBA CBE, Provost of Worcester College, Oxford,  to be held at the Warburg Institute.
  2. 400 anniversary Heythrop  College Conference to be held at Senate House in June 2014. Jesuit Educational Tradition, 19 – 20th June, 2014. CFP and further details click on link.
  3. Call for Papers – Rites and Rituals. Papers must be between 3,000 – 5,000 words in length, formatted according to MLA guidelines. Please email your paper, a short abstract and your academic CV in separate, clearly labelled DOC(X). files to editors@forumjournal.org by Monday 16th September 2013. All eligible articles will be peer reviewed prior to publication. Only one submission per author per issue is permissible. FORUM journal is a postgraduate journal for arts and culture based at the University of Edinburgh. For more information and style guidelines, visit www.forumjournal.org
  4. CFP Warwick University. ‘Laughter & Satire in Europe 1500-1800’ is an interdisciplinary conference to be held 26-27th May 2014 in Venice. The deadline for submitting paper proposals (up to 300 words) is 13th January 2014. Proposals should be submitted to Adam.Morton@warwick.ac.uk.
  5. Call for Papers for a conference on ‘Early Modern Women, Religion and the Body’ at Loughborough University on 22-23 July 2014. 300 word abstracts to Rachel Adcock, Sara Read and Anna Ziomek at emwomen@lboro.ac.uk by 31st January 2014.
  6. Call for Papers: early modern soundscapes Early Modern Soundscapes Thursday 24th – Friday 25th April 2014 Bangor University. We welcome abstracts of not more than 250 words for twenty-minute papers, or proposals for panels comprising three papers, to be sent to Rachel Willie (r.willie@bangor.ac.uk) by December 1st 2013.
  7. Call for Articles for Journal of Northern Renaissance: Numbers in Early Modern Writing. Submission deadline: 1 December 2013  Estimated date of publication: September 2014. This issue will be guest-edited by Dr Katherine Hunt and Rebecca Tomlin. Enquiries regarding possible contributions can be sent to northernrenaissance+numbers@gmail.com.
  8. Low Countries History Seminars, IHR, 2013 – 14.
  9. Essex: The cultural impact of an Elizabethan courtier. One-Day Symposium Saturday 26th October, 12-4.30pm Sheffield Hallam University, Room 9003, Cantor Building, City Campus. There is no registration fee and refreshments will be provided, but we do require you to e-mail us in advance to book a place: A.F.Connolly@shu.ac.uk

  10. 12th ESSE Conference in Kosice, Slovakia, Friday 29 August – Tuesday 2 September, 2014. Seminar on English manuscript studies. Please send your proposals to: Carlo Bajetta (Università della Valle d’Aosta, Italy) carlo.bajetta@univda.it and Guillaume Coatalen (Université de Cergy-Pontoise, France) guillaumecoatalen@hotmail.com.
  11. The Women’s Studies Group 1558-1837 seminar series for the 2013-14 at www.womenstudiesgroup.org.uk
  12. Early Modern Rome 2″ in celebration of the 10th anniversary of the UCEAP “Rome Through the Ages” program, will be held from October 10-12, 2013, full details: conference.eapitaly.it
  13. The London Renaissance Seminar will meet on Saturday 19th October to discuss: Creating Early Modern Memory. 1-5pm, 43 Gordon Square, School of Arts, Birkbeck. All welcome, no registration necessary.
  14. Emma Dillon – Remembering to Forget: Music, Conversion, and the Early Cistercian Experience Tuesday 1st October 2013 5pm, ArtsTwo Room 3.16, Queen Mary, University of London. Centre for Renaissance and Early Modern Studies. Attendance is free; all welcome.
  15. Horace in Renaissance France: Poetry and Scholarship The Warburg Institute, November 29th 2013 (organizers: Daniel Andersson, Ariane Schwartz)
  16. UCL’s Interdisciplinary Medieval and Renaissance Seminars http://www.ucl.ac.uk/mars/seminars-lectures/imars_13_14
  17. Coming soon to The Courtauld Gallery  The Young Dürer: Drawing the Figure  17 October 2013 – 12 January 2014
  18. Reading Conference in Early Modern Studies, 7-9 July 2014: call for papers. Proposals for either papers or panels should be sent by email to the chair of the Conference Committee, Dr. Rebecca Bullard, by 6 January 2014, r.bullard@reading.ac.uk
  19. Text and Book in the Age of Swift. A day conference on 23 November 2013, St Peter’s College Oxford.
  20. Call for Papers for the Second Annual Postgraduate Renaissance Symposium: The Visual Arts and Music in Renaissance Europe c.1400 – 1650, which will take place at The Courtauld on Saturday 18 January 2014 Please send proposals of no more than 250 words and your academic CV by 4 November 2013 to renaissanceartandmusic@gmail.com
  21. Warburg Institute complete Annual Programme available at: http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/fileadmin/images/events/AnnualProgramme2013_14.pdf
  22. Two Calleva Centre three-year Postdoctoral Research Associates developing experimental and text-based research on the psychology of the audience, with particular reference to classical Greek and early modern English drama, Magdalen College (University of Oxford). Application forms and further particulars, which include information on how to apply, are available at www.magd.ox.ac.uk/vacancies/ . The deadline for applications is UK time 12 noon on 1 November 2013.
  23. CFP. British Branch of the International Courtly Literature Society (ICLS) University of Exeter, Monday 14th and Tuesday 15th April, 2014. Proposals for papers of 25 minutes in length in any area of the Society’s interests are invited from the membership. Please send these to Dr Emma Cayley by email (e.j.cayley@exeter.ac.uk) or hard copy by 15th December 2013.

  24. History of Pre-Modern Medicine seminar series returns this autumn.  The 2013-14 series is organised by a group of historians of medicine based at London universities and hosted by the Wellcome Library.
  25. The Gothic Ivories team is delighted to announce that 700 ‘new’ ivory carvings from over 60 different collections are now available online as part of the Gothic Ivories website! (www.gothicivories.courtauld.ac.uk)
  26. INSTITUTE OF HISTORICAL RESEARCH Society, Culture and Belief, 1500-1800, Seminar Series 2013 – 14.

  27. Call for book proposals: Literary & Scientific Cultures of Early Modernity, details here: http://www.ashgate.com/LITSCI. To submit a proposal, or for more information, please contact: Erika Gaffney, Publishing Manager,egaffney@ashgate.com.
  28. Centre for Editing Lives and Letters Director’s Seminar schedule: http://www.livesandletters.ac.uk/?q=content/directors-seminar
  29. Hugh Trevor-Roper Centenary Conference 11 January 2014: Update.
  30. Collegial Communities in Exile Conference: New histories of the Irish, English, Scots, Dutch and other colleges founded on the continent in the early modern period. Mary Immaculate College, University of Limerick, Ireland ― 19-20 June 2014. For more information: http://colleges2014.wordpress.com/
  31. One day colloquium being hosted at Queen Mary, University of London on Saturday 7 December, 2013: ‘Reading, Writing and Religion, 1660-1830′. See colloquium website for further details: http://writingandreligion.wordpress.com/
  32. Lewis as Critic, 23rd November, 2013, Cripps Court, Magdalene College, Cambridge. In this one-day conference we will discuss the significance of C.S. Lewis’ contribution to the practice of criticism and commemorate the 50th anniversary of his death. For more information, and to register, please visit: lewisascritic.wordpress.com
  33. Please find attached and at this link details of the fifth Early Modern Symposium at the Courtauld Institute of Art on Saturday 26 October.http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/researchforum/events/2013/autumn/oct26_FifthEarlyModernSymposium.shtml
  34. Classical Philosophers in Seventeenth Century English Thought 28 May 2014, CREMS, University of York. A day symposium – abstracts by 15th December (c. 250 words). Contact: Kevin Killeen, kevin.killeen@york.ac.uk
  35. Tradescant Lecture with Karen Hearn and Jennifer Potter, 17th October 2013, Garden Museum.
  36. The Keith Walker Memorial Lecture 2013 will take place at 6.30pm on Thursday 14th November, in the Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre, UCL, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT. Professor Sir Brian Vickers (Honorary Research Professor of UCL English) will speak on “The One King Lear“.
  37. Courtauld Institute of Art 2013 autumn term programmeAll seminars are free /open to all and taking place at Somerset House, Strand, WC2R 0RN London.
  38. NEW Cultures of Knowledge Lunchtime Seminar Series: Negotiating Networks. Theme: early modern letters, networks and the digital humanities. Thursdays 1pm, 31st Oct – 5th Dec: Conference Room, Oxford e-Research Centre, Keble Road http://www.culturesofknowledge.org/?page_id=1270
  39. ‘Renaissance Loves’, London Renaissance Seminar, 9 November, 2.00pm-6.00pm, Room 124, Birkbeck College, 43 Gordon Square, London WC1.
  40. CFP. “REVISITING EARLY MODERN PROPHECIES (c.1500-c.1815)” 26–28 June, 2014  Goldsmiths, London. Proposals for 20-minute papers in English (maximum 300 words) with a short bio are invited, and should be sent by 31 October 2013 to either of the conference organisers: Dr Ariel Hessayon  a.hessayon(@gold.ac.uk) or Dr Lionel Laborie  l.laborie(@gold.ac.uk)
  41. Society for Neo-Latin Studies: Annual Lecture November 8th 5 p.m. King’s College London, Classics Department, Room B6. emeritus professor Roger p.h. Green (University of Glasgow), The Poetry of George Buchanan  1973-2023.

  42. *British Milton Seminar, 19 October 2013: Programme*. Venue: In the Birmingham and Midland Institute [**PLEASE NOTE**]. There will be two sessions, from 11.00 am to 12.30 pm and from 2.00 pm to 4.00 pm. You can follow the British Milton Seminar at: http://britishmiltonseminar
  43. The first SOAS Research Seminar in Islamic Art of this year takes place on Thursday 24th October, at 5.30 in B111 (as usual). I am pleased to welcome Dr Martínez-de-Castilla-Muñoz, visiting fellow from the University Complutense of Madrid. Looking forward to seeing you there. SIXTEENTH CENTURY BINDINGS IN THE WESTERN ISLAMIC WORLD.
  44. ‘Death in Scotland, from the medieval to the modern: beliefs, attitudes and practices’ (CFP, Conference, Edinburgh, 31 Jan–2 Feb 2014)
  45. Free study days being held sponsored by the Who Were the Nuns? Project: This Saturday (19th October) in Brentwood, Essex then Saturday 2 November a second event will be held in central Manchester.
  46. Seminar Series 2013-14: Travel: Bodies and Objects in Motion. Seminars will take place at Royal Holloway, 11 Bedford Square, on Wednesdays at 5pm.

 

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1.

Princeton University Press and The Warburg Institute, School of Advanced Study, University of London
E. H. GOMBRICH LECTURES ON THE CLASSICAL TRADITION 2013

ANCIENT STRENGTH
Professor Jonathan Bate FBA CBE, Provost of Worcester College, Oxford

The E. H. Gombrich Lectures is an annual series of Lectures on Aspects of the Classical Tradition, named in honour of Professor Sir Ernst Gombrich FBA OM, former Director of the Warburg Institute and Professor of the History of the Classical Tradition, University of London. The Lectures will be held at the Warburg Institute and will be published by Princeton University Press.

The inaugural series of lectures on Shakespeare and the Classical Tradition will be given by Professor Jonathan Bate, FBA CBE, Editor of Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus, co-editor of The Complete Works, The RSC Shakespeare, author of Shakespeare and OvidThe Genius of ShakespeareSoul of the Age (and many other books) and co-organiser of the 2012 British Museum Exhibition, Shakespeare: Staging the World.

Thursday 10 October 2013, 5pm - Tragical Comical Historical Pastoral: Shakespeare and Classical Genre

Thursday 17 October 2013, 5pm - The Madness of Hercules: Shakespeare and Classical Psychology

Thursday 24 October 2013, 5pm - ‘I will read politic authors’: Shakespeare and Classical Political Thought

Each Lecture will be followed by a Reception.

Attendance is free of charge and pre-registration is not required.

 

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2.

A Celebration of the 400th Anniversary of the Foundation of Heythrop College and of the Jesuit Educational Tradition

19 – 20 June 2014

‘For the Greater Glory of God and the More Universal Good’: A Celebration of the 400th Anniversary of the Foundation of  Heythrop College and of the Jesuit Educational Tradition

Institute of English Studies, Senate House, University of London

CALL FOR PAPERS

During the academic year 2013-2014, Heythrop College will celebrate the 400th anniversary of its foundation by the English Jesuits in Louvain in 1614.  To commemorate this notable anniversary, Heythrop College and the Institute of English Studies of the University of London are organising a conference which will explore the character and significance of the Jesuit educational tradition, with respect both to the study of theology and philosophy and to science, letters and the arts.

Abstracts of no more than 350 words should be submitted by Friday 15 November 2013. Acceptances will be sent out by Friday 29 November 2013.

Please email abstracts and a cover sheet including your name, university, contact information, plus a brief biographical paragraph about your academic interests to  Dr Thomas M. McCoog  (tmmccoog@gmail.com)  and Dr Francesca Bugliani Knox (f.knox@heythrop.ac.uk).

 

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3.

FORUM Journal: Issue 17

Call for Papers – Rites and Rituals

Rituals exist as a result of the actions of specific people or institutions; we recognise those rituals because they are engrained in our cultural customs as much as they are ordained by law. The resulting rituals not only reinforce the beliefs or values of these specific communities, but simultaneously define these group identities. Victor Turner describes  rituals  as  ‘social  dramas’  that allow  any  given culture to maintain a balance between structurally enforced norms and personal autonomy; the medieval carnival with its Lord of Misrule, for example, permitted a short period of topsy-turvy, upside-down role-play in popular culture, to ensure social hierarchies and authority were obeyed and enforced during the rest of the year.

Mary Ann McGrath states that there are four basic factors that form the ritual arena: the ritual artefacts (costumes, food, or decorations), the ritual script (written or oral), the ritual norm (a model or an example), and the ritual meaning (the reason or importance). However, where one or more of these basic factors are missing, questions arise as to the efficacy and stability of the ritual, leading to the subversion of the old ritual and invention of the new. This has led Stanley J. Tambiah and Richard Schechner –amongst others – to consider the performativity of rituals; the circumstances of the creation of ritual, the intent of the ritual performers, and the behaviour of the ritual witnesses. As the melancholy Jacques  declares,  “All  the  world’s  a  stage/  And  all  the  men  and  women  merely  players;/   They  have  their  exits  and  their  entrances;/  And  one  man  in  his  time  plays  many  parts”  (AYLI  2:7).

We are seeking submissions from a range of disciplines relating to the arts, culture or social sciences that consider the topic of RITES & RITUALS for issue 17 of FORUM. Submissions may relate to, but are not limited to:

- literary and film representations of rituals
- performance and performativity of rituals
- subversive ritual in cultural and aesthetic theory
- national vs. parochial identity and rituals
- construction and innovation of new ritual forms
- primitive vs. modern ritual
- ethics of ritual destruction or enforcement
- the sacred and secular ritual divide
- ritual and gender

Papers must be between 3,000 – 5,000 words in length, formatted according to MLA guidelines. Please email your paper, a short abstract and your academic CV in separate, clearly labelled DOC(X). files to editors@forumjournal.org by Monday 16th September 2013. All eligible articles will be peer reviewed prior to publication. Only one submission per author per issue is permissible.

FORUM journal is a postgraduate journal for arts and culture based at the University of Edinburgh. For more information and style guidelines, visit www.forumjournal.org.

 Victoria Anker and Laura Chapot, Co-Editors
Forum: Postgraduate Journal of Culture & the Arts
The University of Edinburghhttp://www.forumjournal.org/

The current issue of Forum on ‘Un/Natural Histories’ is available on our website now!

 

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4.

CFP ‘Laughter & Satire in Europe 1500-1800’ is an interdisciplinary conference to be held 26-27th May 2014. The conference is being organized by the Department of History at the University of Warwick (by Dr. Adam Morton and Prof. Mark Knights) and will take place in Venice at the Palazzo Persaro-Papafava:

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/international/world/venice/

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/emforum/events/laughterconference

The deadline for submitting paper proposals (up to 300 words) is 13th January 2014. Proposals should be submitted to Adam.Morton@warwick.ac.uk.

 

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5.

Call for Papers for a conference on ‘Early Modern Women, Religion and the Body’ at Loughborough University on 22-23 July 2014.

300 word abstracts to Rachel Adcock, Sara Read and Anna Ziomek at emwomen@lboro.ac.uk by 31st January 2014.

 

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 6.

Call for Papers: early modern soundscapes

Early Modern Soundscapes

Thursday 24th – Friday 25th April 2014

Bangor University

To include the Society for Renaissance Studies Annual Welsh Lecture, given by Professor Jennifer Richards (Newcastle University) and Professor Richard Wistreich (Royal Northern College of Music)

The Difficulty of that language is not to bee conceived, and the reasons thereof are especially two:

First, because it hath no affinitie with any other that ever I heard.

Secondly, because it consisteth not so much of words and Letters, as of tunes and uncouth sounds, that no letters can expresse.

For you have few words, but they signifie divers and severall things, and they are distinguished onely by their tunes that are as it were sung in the utterance of them, yet many words there are consisteth of tunes onely, so as if they like they will utter their mindes by tunes without wordes

Francis Godwin, The Man in the Moone (1638)

Early modern culture was awash with sounds.  From psalm singing to tavern songs to the reading of the riot act or town criers announcing noteworthy news, we are presented with an image of oral culture forming the basis of perpetual interaction between individuals and their communities.  Music, in particular, forms a backdrop to the soundscape, negotiating abstract sounds and speech.  This two-day symposium will interrogate ways of conceiving the early modern soundscape.   Topics might include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Sounds and space
  • Sounds sacred
  • Sounds profane
  • Civic noise
  • Imagined soundscapes
  • Interaction between sound and speech communities
  • Oral and literate cultures
  • Music and performance culture
  • Sounds and medicine
  • Sounds and the senses
  • The relationship between words and music

We welcome abstracts of not more than 250 words for twenty-minute papers, or proposals for panels comprising three papers, to be sent to Rachel Willie (r.willie@bangor.ac.uk) by December 1st 2013.

 

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 7.

Call for Papers: Numbers in Early Modern Writing

Submission deadline: 1 December 2013  Estimated date of publication: September 2014

Early modern books are full of numbers, representing both practicality and mystery. The Journal of the Northern Renaissanceinvites contributions for a special issue exploring numbers in early modern literature and textual culture. How were numbers and numerical techniques used in drama, dance, and music? What were the practical issues arising from printing numerical texts, and how were numbers represented on the page? How were the index and the cross-reference created and used? To what extent would an early modern audience recognize mathematical references in literary texts and performance? Who would buy an arithmetic book and how might they use it? Articles are invited on, but not confined to, the following subject areas:

-     Ways of counting and things to count: inventories and accounts; time and tempo; feet and metre.

-       Numbers in print: reference tables, logarithms, cross-referencing, indices.

-       Books on arithmetic, double-entry book-keeping and merchants’ handbooks.

-       Ciphering and deciphering.

-       The use of zero and other mathematical symbols in literature and drama.

-       Dance, music and other numerical art forms.

-       Making a reckoning: performing numbers on stage.

-       Numbers in the material text: ways of using numerical books, and their owners.

-       Mystical numbers, kaballah, numerology.

-       Mathematical methodologies; measuring, mapping and quantifying.

This issue will be guest-edited by Dr Katherine Hunt and Rebecca Tomlin, organisers of a conference on the topic held at Birkbeck, University of London, in May 2013, from which some of the papers are expected to be taken. Potential contributors are advised to consult the JNR web page for details of the submissions procedure and style guidelines:http://www.northernrenaissance.org/information. We also welcome initial enquiries regarding possible contributions, which can be sent to northernrenaissance+numbers@gmail.com.

 

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 8.

Seminar on Low Countries History, 2013-14 session

Convenors: Anne Goldgar (King’s College London), Ben Kaplan (UCL), Ulrich Tiedau (UCL)

Meetings: Fridays at 5:15 pm.  PLEASE NOTE: due to refurbishment work at the IHR, seminars this year meet in alternative locations – see schedule – and 15 mins later than previously.  SH Athlone = the University of London’s Senate House on Malet Street, Athlone Room, located in the South Block on the 1st floor, room 102.  SH Bedford = Senate House, Bedford Room, South Block on the ground floor, room G37.  STB 9 = Stewart House, adjacent to Senate House, at 32 Russell Square, room 9 in the basement.

Autumn Term

October 18        Timon Screech (SOAS), ‘The Dutch, the English and the Northeast

SH Athlone        Passage to Japan, 1600-1615′  (co-sponsored with Japan400)

Nov 1                 Hugh Dunthorne (Swansea), `The Revolt of the Netherlands and its

SH Athlone        impact on early modern Britain’

Nov 15               Joris van Eijnatten (Utrecht), `Willem Bilderdijk, Lord of Teisterbant:

STB 9                Metaphysics, Religion and Politics in the Age of Revolutions’

Nov 29               Guido van Meersbergen (UCL), `Diplomatic Encounters between East

SH Athlone        and West: Dutch Envoys at the Mughal Court (1648-1713)’

Spring Term

Jan 24                 Jesse Spohnholz (Washington State), `Seeing Like a Church: Solving a

SH Athlone        450-Year-Old Mystery and Rethinking the Dutch Reformation’

Feb 7                  Adrian Armstrong (Queen Mary), `Translating poetic capital in 15th-

SH Bedford        century Brussels: from Amé de Montgesoie’s Pas de la Mort to Colijn

Caillieu’s Dal sonder Wederkeeren’

Mar 7                 Martine Gosselink (Rijksmuseum), `The Rijksmuseum and its art and

SH Athlone        historical collections: a peaceful wedding?’

March 21           Mark Hay (King’s College London), `Revolutionary ideas on taxation:

SH Bedford       The Dutch fiscal policy of the period 1795-1814’

Summer Term

May 9                Liesbeth Corens (Cambridge), `Religious Coexistence in a Low

SH Athlone       Countries Health Resort: Protestants and Catholics at Spa’

June 6                Claudia Swan (Northwestern), `Piracy, Porcelain, Profit: Exotic Negoti-

SH Athlone       ations and Early Seventeenth-Century Global Politics’

 

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9.

Essex: The cultural impact of an Elizabethan courtier

One-Day Symposium

Saturday 26th October, 12-4.30pm

Sheffield Hallam University, Room 9003, Cantor Building, City Campus

This one-day symposium marks the publication of a new collection of essays about the life and cultural impact of Robert Devereux, second earl of Essex.  It brings together scholars who have been involved with the collection and whose research continues to engage with some of the issues and questions raised by their work for the volume.  The papers will consider a selection of the diverse visual and textual manifestations of Essex and his circle in poetry and portraiture, as well as in texts produced by the earl himself.

There is no registration fee and refreshments will be provided, but we do require you to e-mail us in advance to book a place: A.F.Connolly@shu.ac.uk

12 noon Arrival and Coffee

12.15 –1.15  Session One

12.15 – Welcome and Opening Remarks – Lisa Hopkins (Sheffield Hallam University)

12.30 ‘”Mine excuse must only be the worthiness of former precedents”: Gervase Markham’s English Arcadia and the Earl of Essex’s Sidneian Inheritance’. Richard Wood (Sheffield Hallam University)

1.15 Lunch 

2.15 – 3.15pm – Session Two

‘More Poetry by the Earl of Essex?’ Hugh Gazzard (St. Hugh’s College, Oxford)

‘From Imitation to Counterfeit: Essex’s hand in correspondence’. Andrew Gordon (University of Aberdeen).

3.15-3.30pm – Coffee

3.30-4.30pm

 ‘”Still renewing wronges”: Gheeraert’s Persian Lady Revealed’. Chris Laoutaris (Shakespeare Institute, University of Birmingham) and Yasmin Arshad (University College London

4.30pm Closing Remarks and conclusion of Symposium

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10.

 

12th ESSE CONFERENCE
in KOŠICE, SLOVAKIA
UPJS FF UPJS
Friday 29 August – Tuesday 2 September, 2014

Seminar on English manuscript studies

The focus is on editing manuscripts from all periods, whether they be strictly literary or not. The seminar is particularly interested in unpublished material in manuscript. Research topics include, and are not restricted to, finding manuscripts and archival work, manuscript collections, scribal work, paleography, manuscripts as books, the coexistence of manuscripts and printed books, what manuscripts tell us on reading habits, editing manuscripts, electronic versus printed editions, manuscript studies and digital humanities. Manuscript studies have been on the cutting edge of literary theory and papers on authorship, the constitution of the text or hermeneutics are welcome.

Please send your proposals to: Carlo Bajetta (Università della Valle d’Aosta, Italy)

carlo.bajetta@univda.it and Guillaume Coatalen (Université de Cergy-Pontoise, France)

guillaumecoatalen@hotmail.com

 

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 11.

The Women’s Studies Group 1558-1837 is an informal and friendly society that meets regularly at the University of London, UK.

We’re delighted to announce that our seminar series for the 2013-14 academic year begins on September 28; all those visiting or based in the UK are welcome to attend.

VENUE: Room 234 in the Senate House, Malet Street, University of London. 2pm-5pm 

Alison Winch: ’Drinking a dish of tea with Sapho’: The Sexual Fantasies of Lady Mary Wortley Montagu and Lord Byron.

Eleonora Capra: Jane Austen in Italy Now and Then (2007).

Kathryn Lowerre: Catholicism, Music, and Money in the Life of an English Opera Singer: Anastasia Robinson.

Corrina Connor: Did Bluestockings play the violin? Music, morals and masculinity in the intellectual societies of eighteenth-century London.

Please share this e-mail with friends and colleagues.

Our full 2013/14 programme is available on our website (link below), with subsequent sessions taking place on 30 November and 25 January.

Any questions, don’t hesitate to contact me.

We hope you can join us.

Kind regards

Louise Duckling (e: louise@philipmarksav.co.uk)

On behalf of the Women’s Studies Group 1558-1837

www.womenstudiesgroup.org.uk

 

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 12.

For information on the upcoming conference “Early Modern Rome 2″ in celebration of the 10th anniversary of the UCEAP “Rome Through the Ages” program, organized by the University of California, Rome Study Center with ACCENT, and in collaboration with the Istituto storico italiano per il Medioevo, the Biblioteca Vallicelliana, the Archivio Storico Capitolino, and the Castello Orsini-Odescalchi di Bracciano, see:
The conference (free and open to the public) will be held from October 10-12, 2013, but all attendees need to register on the conference website.

 

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 13.

The London Renaissance Seminar will meet on Saturday 19th October to discuss:

Creating Early Modern Memory

Speakers include Johanna Harris, University of Exeter; Kate Hodgkin, University of East London; Alexandra Walsham, University of Cambridge; Gillian Woods, Birkbeck, University of London

Saturday 19th October 2013

1-5pm, 43 Gordon Square, School of Arts, Birkbeck

All welcome, no registration necessary.

Any queries to elizabeth.scott-bauman@kcl.ac.uk

 

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 14.

Emma Dillon – Remembering to Forget: Music, Conversion, and the Early Cistercian Experience

Tuesday 1st October 2013
5pm, ArtsTwo Room 3.16
Queen Mary, University of London
Mile End Road E1 4NS

Please join Queen Mary’s Centre for Renaissance and Early Modern Studies and QM Music and Sound for the first event of the academic year. Followed by wine and discussion. Attendance is free; all welcome.

Remembering to Forget: Music, Conversion, and the Early Cistercian Experience

The Cistercian order emerged at the end of the eleventh century, purportedly as a reaction against the decadent excesses associated with the Cluniac tradition. According to the foundational theological and administrative writings of the order, to be Cistercian was to convert; and to convert was to actively forget the trappings of a former religious or secular life. The narrative of conversion and reform appears to correspond to other evidence that early Cistercian houses promoted a reactionary austerity, eschewing decadent material trappings of devotion in favor of a simpler and less distracting devotional environment. That impulse was seemingly true of music: Cistercian liturgy is well-known in the history of medieval chant for its reforms, manifest, for example, in an expunging of melodic ornament and a ban on polyphony.

This paper takes a closer look at the evidence of contemporary writers, music theory and extant liturgical manuscripts and suggests that reforming chant was less an act of erasure or displacement of past traditions. Instead, it argues that there was potentially a virtue in remembering what one was supposed to forget.

Professor Emma Dillon (King’s College London) studied music at Oxford, where completed a DPhil in 1998. She was a Lecturer at the University of Bristol, and Assistant Professor and Professor at the University of Pennsylvania, where she also served as Chair of the Department. She has been a Visiting Professor at the University of California at Berkeley, a Member and Visitor at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton, and a Visiting Scholar at Corpus Christi College, Oxford. She joined the Music Department at King’s in 2013.

Her research focuses on European musical culture from the twelfth to fourteenth centuries. Her work ranges widely in terms of repertories, sources, and methodology, and falls at the intersection of musicology, sound studies, medieval studies, and the history of material texts. She is the author of Medieval Music-Making and the Roman de Fauvel (Cambridge University Press, 2002) and The Sense of Sound: Musical Meaning in France, 1260-1330 (Oxford University Press in 2012).

 

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 15.

Horace in Renaissance France: Poetry and Scholarship
The Warburg Institute, November 29th 2013
(organizers: Daniel Andersson, Ariane Schwartz)
This colloquium will examine both the scholarly and the literary Horace in Renaissance France. Although the works of Horace may have been a relatively late arrival on the educational scene in France (compared to Vergil or Seneca), his influence was crucial in the formation of both the identity of ‘the Poet’ and ideas of philosophical liberty. The publication of the great commentary by the Denys Lambin acted as a sort of fillip to the securer presence of Horace in France, and encouraged a raft of translations. Furthermore his commentary, especially the second edition, marked a sort of coronation of Lambin as a pre-eminent Parisian philologus. Horace turns out to be a crucial part of the story of how France’s identity was fashioned as a second Rome, with a second Augustus and a second Maecenas. Yet much remains to be done. The  nuts and bolts of marginalia and commentaries have still not been subjected to the kind of scrutiny that they reward; the regional stories and the impact of the Italian vernacular literature has yet to be assessed; and finally, it is hoped that all participants will come away from the conference with a clearer idea of the disciplinary boundaries that cluster around and between ‘reception’ and ‘reading’. Post-graduate students are, in particular, warmly invited to attend. Presentations will be in both French and English.

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 16.

UCL IMARS Seminars

Full schedule for this year’s seminar, please follow the link:

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/mars/seminars-lectures/imars_13_14

Best Regards,

Alison Ray

Email: alison.ray09@ucl.ac.uk

Co-convenor and PhD Student in Medieval History, UCL

 

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 17.

Coming soon to The Courtauld Gallery

The Young Dürer: Drawing the Figure

17 October 2013 – 12 January 2014

 

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 18.

The Early Modern Research Centre, University of Reading

Reading Conference in Early Modern Studies, 7-9 July 2014: call for papers

The Reading Early Modern Conference continues to establish itself as the place where early modernists meet each July for stimulation, conversation and debate. As in previous years, proposals of individual papers and panels are invited on research in any aspect of early modern studies relating to Britain, Europe and the wider world. This year, the plenary speakers are Randall McLeod (Toronto) and Tony Claydon (Bangor).

We would welcome proposals for individual papers and panels on any aspect of early modern literature, history, art, music and culture. Panels have been proposed on the following themes and further panels or individual papers are also invited on these topics or any other aspect of early modern studies:

  • 1714: the death of Queen Anne, the last of the Stuarts; succession in a British and European context.
  • Material texts: technologies of paper, pen and print; binding and unbinding books; compilation, collection, anthologising; modern technologies and early modern texts.
  • Writers’ career choices: poetry versus plays; theatre history; plague closures; history of printing; debates over authorship.
  • Knowledge, method, practice; mechanic arts; guilds and mysteries; tacit knowledge; statecraft andarcana imperii; how-to manuals; thinking about thinking.

Proposals for panels should consist of a minimum of two and a maximum of four papers.

Each panel proposal should contain the names of the session chair, the names and affiliations of the speakers and short abstracts (200 word abstracts) of the papers together with email contacts for all participants. A proposal for an individual paper should consist of a 200 word abstract of the paper with brief details of affiliation and career.

Proposals for either papers or panels should be sent by email to the chair of the Conference Committee, Dr. Rebecca Bullard, by 6 January 2014, r.bullard@reading.ac.uk

We welcome proposals from postgraduates, and the conference hopes to make some money available for postgraduate bursaries. Anyone for whom some financial assistance is a prerequisite for their attendance should mention this when submitting their proposal.

 

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19.

Text and Book in the Age of Swift

We would be very grateful if you would share the information about this conference with members of your department.

Text and Book in the Age of Swift

A day conference on 23 November 2013

St Peter’s College Oxford

Speakers include

Paddy Bullard (University of Kent)

Pat Rogers (University of South Florida)

Valerie Rumbold (University of Birmingham)

Abigail Williams (University of Oxford)

In a period when the English and Irish book trades were increasing their political and commercial importance, no one had a sharper eye for print’s expressive and satirical potential than Swift. Papers at this conference will review his relationship to books, query his literary and book-trade contexts, detail new research on eighteenth-century editions of Shakespeare and Spenser, and reflect on the editing of volumes in the Cambridge Swift.

Registration

There will be conference fee of £20 which will cover lunch, coffee, and tea. Participants will be invited to a reception at St Peter’s to celebrate the publication of the Cambridge edition of Swift’s Journal to Stella, edited by Abigail Williams, and a collection supplementary to the edition, Swift and the Eighteenth-Century Book, edited by Paddy Bullard and James McLaverty.

The registration form can be downloaded at

http://www.spc.ox.ac.uk/event/22/331/text_and_book_in_the_age_of_swift.html

Please return the form by email to alison.wiblin@spc.ox.ac.uk or by post to Alison Wiblin, St Peter’s College, Oxford, OX1 2DL. Payment should be in the form a cheque made out to Abigail Williams, or money can be paid in directly to the appropriate bank account.

Academic enquiries should be addressed to the Conference Coordinators, Abigail Williams and James McLaverty, atswift@spc.ox.ac.uk

Jonathan Swift and the Eighteenth-Century Book

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 20.

Please find below the Call for Papers for the Second Annual Postgraduate Renaissance Symposium:

-       The Visual Arts and Music in Renaissance Europe c.1400 – 1650, which will take place at The Courtauld on Saturday 18 January 2014

Please send proposals of no more than 250 words and your academic CV by 4 November 2013 torenaissanceartandmusic@gmail.com

For further information:http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/researchforum/events/2013/autumn/jan18_RenaissanceArtsMusicSymposium.shtml

With best wishes

Research Forum

The Courtauld Institute of Art

Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN

www.courtauld.ac.uk

 

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 21.

We are writing to let you know about the exciting and varied range of events taking place at the Warburg Institute during 2013/14.

The complete Annual Programme is available at: http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/fileadmin/images/events/AnnualProgramme2013_14.pdf

Listed below are just a few of the events taking  place during the Autumn term:

Public Lectures

  • 9 October – Love and Pastoral: Constructing a History of Arcadia – Dr Paul Holberton
  • 10, 17 and 24 October – E H Gombrich Lecture Series on the Classical Tradition – Ancient Strength by Professor Jonathan Bate, Provost, Worcester College, University of Oxford

Colloquia

  • 25 October – Sculpture in Rome: Rethinking Classicism and Questioning Materiality
  • 7 – 8 November – Platonism after Plato in the Renaissance
  • 16 December – The Afterlife of the Kulturwissenschaftliche Bibliothek. Hamburg and London Traditions in the Development of the Warburg Institute. A Commemoration of the Migration in December 1933

Further details about all our events are available on our website at: http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/nc/events/

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 22.

Two Calleva Centre three-year Postdoctoral Research Associates
 
Magdalen College (University of Oxford) proposes to appoint two postdoctoral research associates in connection with a collaborative project entitled Adults at Play(s). Both posts are for three years from 1 October 2014. Candidates must have a doctorate in hand by that date. They will already have demonstrated outstanding promise either in the study of dramatic literature or in experimental psychology, and will have an aptitude and enthusiasm for interdisciplinary work across these areas. The postholders will collaborate with three fellows of the college (Felix Budelmann, Robin Dunbar and Laurie Maguire) in developing experimental and text-based research on the psychology of the audience, with particular reference to classical Greek and early modern English drama. Informal enquiries should be directed to felix.budelmann@magd.ox.ac.uk,robin.dunbar@magd.ox.ac.uk or laurie.maguire@magd.ox.ac.uk.
Both appointments will be made at points 29-31 on the University Salary Scale 7, currently £29,541-£31,331 p.a.; plus benefits.
Application forms and further particulars, which include information on how to apply, are available at www.magd.ox.ac.uk/vacancies/ . The deadline for applications is UK time 12 noon on 1 November 2013.
Magdalen College is an Equal Opportunities Employer.

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 23.

British Branch of the International Courtly Literature Society (ICLS)

University of Exeter, Monday 14th and Tuesday 15th April, 2014

Call for Papers:

The next meeting of the British Branch of the International Courtly Literature Society will take place on 14th/15th April 2014 at the University of Exeter, hosted by Dr Emma Cayley and Dr Thomas Hinton (Dept of Modern Languages: French)http://humanities.exeter.ac.uk/modernlanguages/

For those who are able to stay on Tuesday afternoon, a tour of Exeter Cathedral and the historic medieval centre of Exeter is planned. We will see the famous tenth-century Exeter Book (Codex Exoniensis) and other treasures of the Cathedral Library. http://www.exeter-cathedral.org.uk/

Proposals for papers of 25 minutes in length in any area of the Society’s interests are invited from the membership. Please send these to Dr Emma Cayley by email (e.j.cayley@exeter.ac.uk) or hard copy by 15th December 2013 to:

Dr Emma Cayley

Head of Modern Languages

College of Humanities

University of Exeter

Queen’s Building

Exeter EX4 4QH

Please include any particular AV requests with your proposal. All conference rooms are equipped with extensive AV facilities including fixed PC, powerpoint projection and screens.

 The conference will run from approx 11am on Monday 14th April to 2pm on Tuesday 15th April. All sessions will take place in the Margaret Rooms, located in the well-equipped Queen’s Building on the lovely Streatham Campus.

http://www.exeter.ac.uk/visit/directions/googlestreathammap/

B&B accommodation will be available for all delegates at the very comfortable Holland Hall, just a five to ten-minute walk from Queen’s Building on both Sunday and Monday nights if required. All rooms are en-suite with double beds, and many have unparalleled views over the Exwick Hills. Parking is available for residents.http://www.exeter.ac.uk/eventexeter/ourvenues/hollandhall/

Rates (approx):

Non-residential: Standard, £120; PG/unwaged, £95.

Residential (incl. Monday night B&B and Dinner at Holland Hall: Standard £200; PG/unwaged, £175.

Extra night B&B on Sunday available at £45 for single occupancy.  Double occupancy available for all B&B bookings.

Monday dinner at Holland Hall for non-residents: £35

Day delegate: Standard £65; PG/unwaged, £50.

All rates include tea/coffee/biscuits and buffet lunches.

 Registration forms will be available in due course from the conference website:http://humanities.exeter.ac.uk/modernlanguages/research/conferences/britishbranchoftheinternationalcourtlyliteraturesocietyicls/

 

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 24.

Following a successful first year, the History of Pre-Modern Medicine seminar series returns this autumn.  The 2013-14 series – organised by a group of historians of medicine based at London universities and hosted by the Wellcome Library – will commence with four seminars.

The series will be focused on pre-modern medicine, which we take to cover European and non-European history before the 20th century (antiquity, medieval and early modern history, some elements of 19th-century medicine). The seminars are open to all.

PROGRAMME FOR AUTUMN 2013

Tues 15th Oct, Anita Guerrini (Oregon State), ‘The Galenist as Mechanist: Claude Perrault and the Natural History of Animals’.

Tues 29th Oct, François-Olivier Touati (Tours), ‘Between the East and the West : transmission of diseases, connection of medical responses during the Middle Ages’.

Tues 5th Nov, Hannah Newton (Cambridge), ‘“O how sweet is ease!”: Recovering from Illness in Early Modern England, 1580-1720’.

Tues 19th Nov, Emilie Savage-Smith (Oxford) ‘“The Best Accounts of the Classes of Physicians”: A history of medicine throughout the known world, composed in Syria in the 13th century’.

All seminars will take place in the Wellcome Trust, Gibbs Building, 215 Euston Road, NW1 2BE.  Doors at 6pm prompt, seminars will start at 6.15.

The programme for January-March 2014 will follow in the new year.

Organising Committee: Elma Brenner (Wellcome Library), Sandra Cavallo (RHUL), John Henderson (BirkbeckUL) Colin Jones (QMUL), William MacLehose (UCL), Anna Maerker (KCL), Christelle Rabier (LSE), Patrick Wallis (LSE, convenor), Ronit Yoeli-Tlalim (Goldsmiths).

Enquiries to Ross MacFarlane (Wellcome Library: R.MacFarlane@wellcome.ac.uk) or Dr Patrick Wallis (LSE:p.h.wallis@lse.ac.uk).

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25.

The Gothic Ivories team is delighted to announce that 700 ‘new’ ivory carvings from over 60 different collections are now available online as part of the Gothic Ivories website! (www.gothicivories.courtauld.ac.uk)

Highlights include the Musei Vaticani in Rome, the Schnütgen Museum in CologneThe Burrell Collection in Glasgow, the Bonnefanten Museum in Maastricht, important collections in Madrid such as the Fundación Lázaro Galdiano and theInstituto Valencia de Don Juan, Scandinavian collections, from Copenhagen to Oslo, and from Stockholm to Lund, theMuseo di Capodimonte and Museo di Duca di Martina in Naples, the Czartoryski Museum in Cracow, the Museum of Applied Arts in Budapest, the Musée de l’Hôtel Sandelin in Saint-Omer, as well as many smaller and unexpected collections in Brie-Comte-RobertCapri, etc.!

The Gothic Ivories Project is also getting interested in so-called ‘fictile ivories’, i.e. casts of ivory sculptures made in the 19th century. As the Conway Library at the Courtauld Institute of Art has a small collection of such casts, we were able to add photographs of these to our corpus. For more details, see here:http://www.gothicivories.courtauld.ac.uk/stories/yvard_news.html

We wish to thank all collaborating institutions for their amazing support and all their work.

Happy browsing and, as always, spread the word!

Best wishes,

Catherine

Dr Catherine Yvard

Project Manager - Gothic Ivories Project

Witt Library

Courtauld Institute

Somerset House, Strand

London WC2R 0RN

Direct line: 00 44 (0) 20 7848 7657

The Gothic Ivories Website is now live! www.gothicivories.courtauld.ac.uk

 

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 26.

INSTITUTE OF HISTORICAL RESEARCH
Society, Culture and Belief, 1500-1800

Convenors: Laura Gowing (King’s College London), Kate Hodgkin (University of East London) Michael Hunter (Birkbeck) and Brodie Waddell (Birkbeck).

The academic year 2013-14 marks the 35th anniversary of the founding of this seminar in 1979, and this will be celebrated by a miscellany of papers by old and new friends of the seminar

 

Seminars will take place in the Bedford Room, G37, Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1, on the following Thursdays at 5.30 p.m. All are welcome!

10 October

Peter Burke (Emmanuel College, Cambridge)

 Generation: is this a useful category of analysis for early modern historians?

7 November

Michael Hunter (Birkbeck)

Boyle’s legacy: second sight in English and Scottish thought in the long 18th century

Friday 22 November  Joint session with Women’s History Seminar, in Senate House G21A

Sarah Fox (Manchester)

 ’I do most sincerely wish you Dear Madam a Happy Minute’: the experience of childbirth in the long 18th century

5 December

Matt Phillpott (IHR),

 Tracing the reputation of Polydore Vergil: scholarly debates and cultural change during    the English Reformation

23 January

Lyndal Roper (Oriel College, Oxford)

 [Title to be confirmed]

20 February

Mark Knights (University of Warwick)

 Corruption in early modern Britain

20 March

Katherine Hunt (University of East Anglia)

 Shuffle and play, read and learn: early modern English didactic playing cards.

 

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 27.

Call for book proposals: Literary & Scientific Cultures of Early Modernity

For more than a decade now, Literary and Scientific Cultures of Early Modernity,http://www.ashgate.com/LITSCI, has provided a forum for groundbreaking work on the relations between literary and scientific discourses in Europe, during a period when both fields were in a crucial moment of historical formation. We welcome proposals that address the many overlaps between modes of imaginative writing typical of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries—poetics, rhetoric, prose narrative, dramatic production, utopia—and the vocabularies, conceptual models, and intellectual methods of newly emergent ‘scientific’ fields such as medicine, astronomy, astrology, alchemy, psychology, mapping, mathematics, or natural history. In order to reflect the nature of intellectual inquiry during the period, the series is interdisciplinary in orientation and publishes monographs, edited collections, and selected critical editions of primary texts relevant to an understanding of the mutual implication of literary and scientific epistemologies.

As the series continues to evolve, we particularly seek submissions to do with:

·         alchemy

·         science in the New World

·         meteorology

·         knowledge networks

·         global science

·         machines

·         poetics and science

·         navigation/mapmaking

To submit a proposal, or for more information, please contact: Erika Gaffney, Publishing Manager,egaffney@ashgate.com

 

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 28.

Centre for Editing Lives and Letters Director’s Seminar schedule: http://www.livesandletters.ac.uk/?q=content/directors-seminar

 

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 29.

CENTENARY CONFERENCE:

                                 HUGH TREVOR-ROPER 1914-2014

A series of papers and discussions to mark the centenary of his birth (on 15 January) and to appraise aspects of his thought and writing.

The programme is given below. Those who have seen this document in an earlier form should please note the change of venue and the

closing date for full pre-registration. Any further announcements about the conference will be made on

www.hughtrevorroper.co.uk.

If you have difficulty in accessing this site, please email Blair Worden as below.

The conference, which is arranged by the Dacre Trust in association with the Oxford History Faculty, will be held on 

                                               SATURDAY 11 JANUARY 2014                                                 

                                                                     in the

                                   OXFORD UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION SCHOOLS

                                           (OX1 4AS: FOR TRAVEL FROM LONDON SEE BELOW)

                                                              Programme

9.30 – 10.00 Arrival and Registration

 10.00 – 11.30 SESSION 1: MID-SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY REVOLUTIONS

Sir John Elliott, ‘Trevor-Roper and “The General Crisis of the Seventeenth Century”’

Blair Worden, ‘The Unpublished Book: The Puritan Revolution’

Mark Greengrass, ‘“Three Foreigners: The Philosophers of the Puritan Revolution”’

                                                               COFFEE

11.55 – 1.00 SESSION 2: ERASMIANISM AND ECUMENICALISM

Peter N. Miller, ‘Trevor-Roper and the Erasmian Tradition’

Noel Malcolm, ‘Another Unpublished Book: “The Ecumenical Movement and the Church of England, 1598-1618”’

                                                         BUFFET LUNCH 

2.00 – 3.55 SESSION 3: THE SECOND WORLD WAR

Richard Overy, ‘The Last Days of Hitler’

Sir Michael Howard, ‘Trevor-Roper and Wartime Intelligence’

Eberhard Jäckel, ‘Trevor-Roper and Hitler’

Gina Thomas, ‘Trevor-Roper and Himmler’s Masseur’

                                                              T EA

4.15 – 4.50 SESSION 4: THE PROSE

John Banville, ‘Trevor-Roper as Prose Stylist’

4.50 – 5.30 SESSION 5: CONCLUDING DISCUSSION

Brief remarks by a sequence of speakers will precede comments from the floor. Provisional list of speakers:

Peter Ghosh

Colin Kidd

Noel Malcolm

Scott Mandelbrote

John Robertson

Paul Rose

Blair Worden

5.30 – 7.15 RECEPTION -

to celebrate the centenary, and to mark the publication of ONE HUNDRED LETTERS FROM HUGH TREVOR-ROPER, a selection of letters to a variety of correspondents written between 1943 and 2001. The book is edited by Richard Davenport-Hines and Adam Sisman and will be published by Oxford University Press. Those who have attended part or all of the conference will be welcome at the reception.

ARRANGEMENTS FOR ATTENDANCE AND PRE-REGISTRATION

THE PAPERS AND DISCUSSIONS ARE OPEN TO ALL, AND THOSE WHO COME TO THEM ARE WELCOME TO DO SO FOR EITHER ALL OR PART OF THE PROCEEDINGS. THERE IS NO CHARGE FOR ATTENDANCE OR FOR LUNCH OR REFRESHMENTS, BUT THOSE WISHING TO ATTEND WILL NEED TO PRE-REGISTER. SPACE IS LIMITED AND PLACES WILL BE ALLOCATED FIRST-COME-FIRST SERVED.

IN ANY CASE IT MAY NOT BE POSSIBLE TO OFFER LUNCH OR REFRESHMENTS, OR ATTENDANCE AT THE RECEPTION, TO ANYONE PRE-REGISTERING LATER THAN

                                                      MONDAY 9 DECEMBER 

TO PRE-REGISTER PLEASE EMAIL BLAIR WORDEN (WHO WILL BE HAPPY TO ANSWER QUERIES) AT

blair.worden@history.ox.ac.uk

THOSE PRE-REGISTERING SHOULD PLEASE  SAY WHETHER I) THEY WILL TAKE LUNCH; (2) THEY WILL ATTEND THE RECEPTION; (3) THEY EXPECT TO ATTEND ALL THE SESSIONS OR, IF NOT, FOR WHICH OF THEM THEY PLAN TO BE PRESENT. THEY SHOULD PLEASE MENTION ANY DIETARY REQUIREMENTS FOR LUNCHTIME.

TRAVEL FROM LONDON

The Examination Schools, which are in the High Street, are by the Queen’s Lane bus stop, where London buses stop.

DACRE CENTENARY LECTURES

In the autumn of 2014 a series of Dacre Centenary Lectures will be held, in
association with the Oxford History Faculty, in the Examination Schools,
Oxford, on Fridays at 5 p.m., provisionally under the title ‘IDEAS AND SOCIETY
c. 1600-1800’. The speakers will be
 ANTHONY GRAFTON, MICHAEL HUNTER, JONATHAN ISRAEL, COLIN KIDD, NOEL MALCOLM, DAVID WOMERSLEY AND BRIAN YOUNG.

 

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 30.

For more information: http://colleges2014.wordpress.com/

Collegial Communities in Exile Conference: New histories of the Irish, English, Scots, Dutch and other colleges founded on the continent in the early modern period

Mary Immaculate College, University of Limerick, Ireland ― 19-20 June 2014

Early modern Europe witnessed the large-scale migration of peoples for religious, political, economic, social and other reasons. This important feature of European history has received sustained attention from scholars in recent decades as research has increasingly pointed to the transnational nature of early modern societies. One of the striking features of early modern Catholic migration, especially from Ireland, England and Scotland, was the establishment of national ‘colleges’ on the continent to facilitate the formation and education of clerical and lay students. William Allen’s foundation of an English College at Douai in 1568 was quickly followed by others, as well as by Scots Colleges (the Scots College in Paris was unusual: it pre-dated Allen’s Douai establishment) and more than forty Irish Colleges stretching from Leuven to Rome and Lisbon to Prague. This phenomenon was not confined to English, Scots and Irish Catholics: Leuven and other cities witnessed the foundation of Dutch Colleges, while Rome saw a dramatic increase in the number of colleges hosting foreign students. The importance of the colleges has long been recognised by historians, but their histories have too often been located within isolated national or confessional historiographical traditions. Far from exile outposts, the colleges were dynamic focal points of migrant communities. This conference seeks to re-conceptualise the colleges in a comparative framework by exploring the histories of Irish, English, Scots, Dutch, Roman and other colleges together and by drawing parallels with educational institutions established by other religious minorities and refugees.

The conference welcomes proposals for papers on any aspect of the Irish, English, Scots, Dutch, Roman or other colleges in the early modern period or in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We also welcome proposals for papers on individuals or groups associated with the colleges.

Papers dealing with neglected issues are especially welcome, including: buildings, spaces and architecture; material culture; music; social and financial histories; relationships with migrant communities and networks; relationships with host societies (including state and municipal authorities; universities; churches; religious houses); political and intellectual engagements; self-fashioning and the colleges; the ‘afterlives’ of the colleges in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; the historiography of the colleges; parallel institutions established by other religious minorities and refugees in early modern Europe.

Proposals for 25-minute papers should be submitted by e-mail to Liam Chambers (Liam.Chambers@mic.ul.ie) before 17 January 2014. Proposals should include: name, institutional affiliation (if appropriate), paper title, and a 250-word abstract. We also welcome proposals for three-speaker panels. Postgraduate students are particularly encouraged to offer papers. Prospective speakers will be notified of a decision in February 2014 at the latest.

Plenary Speakers: Professor Willem Frijhoff (VU University, Amsterdam) on Dutch Colleges;Professor Michael Questier (Queen Mary, University of London) on English Colleges; Dr Thomas O’Connor (National University of Ireland, Maynooth) on Irish Colleges; ProfessorMícheál Mac Craith (St Isidore’s College, Rome) on the colleges of the Irish regular clergy; a speaker to be confirmed on Scots Colleges

 

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 31.

You may be interested in a one day colloquium being hosted at Queen Mary, University of London on Saturday 7 December, 2013. The event is ‘Reading, Writing and Religion, 1660-1830′. See the attached CFP and colloquium website for further details: http://writingandreligion.wordpress.com/
All best,

Victoria Van Hyning
PhD Candidate, University of Sheffield
Department of English Literature
‘Letters and Lives’ British Library studentship holder
MSt Oxford
www.pickeringchatto.com/convents

 

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 32.

‘Lewis as Critic’
23rd November, 2013
Cripps Court, Magdalene College, Cambridge
In this one-day conference we will discuss the significance of C.S.
Lewis’ contribution to the practice of criticism and commemorate the
50th anniversary of his death.
We have Rt. Rev Dr. Rowan Williams on Lewis’ Milton; Prof. Helen Cooper
on Lewis as Medievalist; Prof. Ad Putter on Lewis and Allegory; Rev. Dr.
Malcolm Guite on Lewis’ Abolition of Man; Prof. Stephen Prickett on
Criticism, Theology and Fiction and Dr. Stephen Logan on Lewis’ Soul.
Some of the issues we plan to discuss are how do we think of Lewis’
critical writing now; is he still on our reading lists; what do students
make of his views on literature?
Registration closes on 25th October, 2013
For more information, and to register, please visit:
lewisascritic.wordpress.com
For updates of conference news, ‘follow’ us on twitter @lewisascritic
To contact us, email lewisascritic@gmail.com

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 33.

Please find attached and at this link details of the fifth Early Modern Symposium at the Courtauld Institute of Art on Saturday 26 October.

http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/researchforum/events/2013/autumn/oct26_FifthEarlyModernSymposium.shtml

 

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 34.

Classical Philosophers in Seventeenth Century English Thought

28 May 2014, CREMS, University of York

A day symposium – Keynote speakers: Prof Jessica Wolfe (North Carolina) and Prof Sarah Hutton (Aberystwyth)

This one day symposium will look at the reception of classical philosophers in seventeenth century English thought and culture, in philosophy, religion, natural philosophy, poetry and literature, the university, or other areas of early modern intellectual life. The focus will be on England, but not on English, and we encourage papers on the Latin reception of classical philosophy.

We will take the term ‘classical philosophy’ broadly speaking, and with a generic latitude, so that Homer or Hesiod might be considered, as they certainly were in the early modern period, as contributors to the philosophical outlook of the ancients, and so that while Aristotle, Plato, Epicurus, Seneca or Cicero are central and protean in their seventeenth century reception, so too Virgil, Ovid and Lucretius were seen as containing an important philosophical core.  Of interest also might be the collations and compendia of classical thought that served as a digest of ancient ideas, whether those of the ancients themselves, such as Diogenes Laertius, or of the early modern writers, such as Thomas Stanley’s History of Philosophy. How did early modern writers accommodate, transpose or circumvent the pagan elements in ancient philosophy? How concerned were early modern thinkers with the systematic and with completeness in their use of classical philosophers? How was the pagan religion transposed to a Christian era?

Abstracts by 15th December (c. 250 words)

Contact: Kevin Killeen, kevin.killeen@york.ac.uk

This symposium is part of a diffuse and ongoing Thomas Browne Seminar that has digressed quite far: http://www.york.ac.uk/english/news-events/browne/

 

 

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 35.

 

 

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 36.

The Keith Walker Memorial Lecture 2013 will take place at 6.30pm on Thursday 14th November, in the Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre, UCL, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT. There are maps and directions at http://www.ucl.ac.uk/maps. Please reserve your place by going to keithwalker.eventbrite.co.uk. All welcome.
 

Professor Sir Brian Vickers (Honorary Research Professor of UCL English) will speak on “The One King Lear“.

The Keith Walker Memorial Lecture is a biennial event to commemorate a much loved member of staff of UCL English Department who was a renowned editor of Rochester, Dryden, and Marvell. This year we look forward to an exciting and thought-provoking lecture by the distinguished scholar Sir Brian Vickers. Since the 1980s it has been generally accepted that Shakespeare revised King Lear in around 1610, and that the Quarto and Folio editions represent two substantially different plays, often printed separately in modern editions. Professor Vickers will present evidence to refute this view.

 

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37.

 Please find below details of the 2013 autumn term programme for the Research Seminars. (All seminars are free /open to all and taking place at The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, WC2R 0RN London )EARLY MODERN

·          Monday, 14 October – Nick Grindle (University College London): Marginal Figures: A New Approach to George Morland. 6.00pm, Research Forum South Room

·          Monday, 28 October – Speaker TBC. 6.00pm, Research Forum South Room

  • Monday, 25 November – Meredith Gamer (Yale University): Hanged, Quartered, and Drawn: Visual cultures of the Criminal Body from Tyburn to the Academy. 6.00pm, Research Forum South Room

RENAISSANCE

·          Wednesday, 16 October – Cristina Terzaghi (Università degli Studi Roma Tre): Caravaggio and Copies: Art Market and the Birth of a Style. 5.30pm, Research Forum South Room

·          Wednesday, 6 November – Laura Teza (Università degli Studi di Perugia): Caravaggio’s The Boy Peeling Fruit and the Academy of the Insensati. 5.30pm, Research Forum South Room 

·          Thursday, 5 December – Denise Allen (Frick Collection, New York): Considering Antico after an Exhibition.6.00pm (note time), Research Forum South Room

All seminars are free and open to all

Further information : http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/researchforum/calendar.shtml

Research Forum

The Courtauld Institute of Art

Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN

 

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 38.

NEW Cultures of Knowledge Lunchtime Seminar Series: Negotiating Networks

Theme: early modern letters, networks and the digital humanities.

Thursdays 1pm, 31st Oct – 5th Dec: Conference Room, Oxford e-Research Centre, Keble Road

Lunch provided (first come, first served)

http://www.culturesofknowledge.org/?page_id=1270

All welcome!

NB: Nov 21st seminar will be held in Room 8, St Anne’s College, Woodstock Road

 

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39.

‘Renaissance Loves’

London Renaissance Seminar

9 November, 2.00pm-6.00pm

Room 124

Birkbeck College,

43 Gordon Square,

London WC1.

Ms Linda Grant   (Birkbeck)‘“Loved as no woman shall ever be loved again”: Catullus and the shaping of sixteenth-century English love poetry.’

Professor Stephen Guy-Bray (Toronto) , ‘”Militat omnis amans”: Love as War in Renaissance Sonnets.’

Professor Ian Moulton (Arizona), ‘Love in Print: Romance and the Book Market.’

Professor Will Fisher (NYU) “Seignor Dildo’s Adventures in Britain”:Sexual Instruments and Women’s Erotic Agency in England, c.1600-1725.’

Organisers: Linda Grant, Judith Hudson, Sue Wiseman

Contact: s.wiseman@bbk.ac.uk

 

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40.

“REVISITING EARLY MODERN PROPHECIES (c.1500-c.1815)”
26–28 June, 2014 
Goldsmiths, London
The Reformation dramatically changed Europe’s religious and political landscapes within a few decades. The Protestant emphasis on translating the Scriptures into the vernacular and the developments of the printing press rapidly gave increased visibility to the most obscure parts of the Bible. Similarly, Spanish and Italian mystics promoted a spiritual regeneration of the Catholic Church during the Counter-Reformation. Prophecies, whether of biblical, ancient or popular origin, as well as their interpretations gradually began reaching a wider audience, sparking controversies throughout all levels of society across Europe. In recent years, new research has eroded the long standing historiographical consensus of an increasing secularisation accelerated by the Enlightenment, which allegedly cast away beliefs in prophecies and miracles as outmoded. The multiplication of case studies on millenarian movements suggests a radically different picture, yet many questions remain. How did prophecies evolve with the politico-religious conjunctions of their time? Who read them? How seriously were they taken?This three-day, international conference will aim to answer these questions by bringing together scholars from around the world to reassess the importance of prophecies from the Reformation to the French Revolution and beyond. We therefore invite papers and panel proposals on prophecy in Europe and the Mediterranean world between approximately 1500 and 1800. Possible topics may include, but are not limited to: apocalyptic predictions, the Antichrist, millenarianism, irenicism, wonders and miracles, astrology and divination, ecumenical movements, religious utopias, mystical networks, enthusiasts and female mystics.‌Keynote speakers:Prof. Irena Backus (Geneva)
Prof. Nigel Smith (Princeton)
Prof. Christopher Rowland (Oxford)

Other confirmed speakers:Federico Barbierato
Jürgen Beyer
Vittoria Feola
David Finnegan
Mercedes García-Arenal
Crawford Gribben
Jacques Halbronn
Warren Johnston
Nick McDowell
Jo SpaansProposals for 20-minute papers in English (maximum 300 words) with a short bio are invited, and should be sent by 31 October 2013 to either of the conference organisers:Dr Ariel Hessayon  a.hessayon(@gold.ac.uk)
Dr Lionel Laborie  l.laborie(@gold.ac.uk)

 

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41.

Society for Neo-Latin Studies:

Annual Lecture

November 8th 5 p.m.

 King’s College London, Classics Department, Room B6

emeritus professor roger p.h. green

(University of Glasgow)

The Poetry of George Buchanan  1973-2023

Professor Green’s lecture will review the remarkable surge in scholarly study of the poetry of George Buchanan (1506-82) over recent years, and also look forward to the next decade. He will concentrate in particular on Ian McFarlane’s biography of Buchanan (1981) and the work, sadly now truncated, of the late Philip Ford  (especially his George Buchanan, Prince of Poets, 1982), without forgetting Buchanan’s tragedies (Walsh and Sharratt, 1983) or John Durkan’s Bibliography of George Buchanan (1994).  Such fundamental works continue to stimulate and inform Buchanan research, as does more recent work, much of it benefiting from Philip Ford’s help and leadership. By 2023, perhaps, the surge will seem unique for a Neo-Latin poet.

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42.

*British Milton Seminar, 19 October 2013: Programme* Saturday 19 October 2013

Venue: In the Birmingham and Midland Institute

[**PLEASE NOTE**]. There will be two sessions, from 11.00 am to 12.30 pm and from 2.00 pm to 4.00 pm

Programme: 11.00-12.30 John Coffey (Leicester), ‘Milton and Augustine revisited’; Nicholas McDowell (Exeter), ‘Milton and Pamela’s Prayer: Revisiting a Cold Case’.

2.00-4.00 Ivana Bičak (Leeds), ‘Gaudensque viam fecisse ruina: The Grotesque Mode in the Epic Poetry of Milton and Lucan’; Cedric Brown (Reading), ‘Milton and Cyriac Skinner revisited’.

The Birmingham and Midland Institute (BMI) was founded by Act of Parliament in 1854, for ‘the Diffusion and Advancement of Science, Literature and Art amongst all Classes of Persons resident in Birmingham and the Midland Counties,’ and continues to pursue these aims. The BMI is located in the heart of Birmingham’s city centre, just a few minutes’ walk from Birmingham New Street, Snow Hill and Moor Street railway stations: Birmingham and Midland Institute Margaret Street Birmingham B3 3BS

Please follow this link for a map of the BMI’s location, and for further information about the BMI and its Library: http://bmi.org.uk/location.html

For further information about the British Milton Seminar, please contact either: Professor Thomas N. Corns (els009@bangor.ac.uk), or Dr Hugh Adlington (h.c.adlington@bham.ac.uk). Thomas N. Corns and Hugh Adlington (Co-convenors)

You can follow the British Milton Seminar at: http://britishmiltonseminar

 

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43.

The first SOAS Research Seminar in Islamic Art of this year takes place on Thursday 24th October, at 5.30 in B111 (as usual). I am pleased to welcome Dr Martínez-de-Castilla-Muñoz, visiting fellow from the University Complutense of Madrid. Looking forward to seeing you there.
 
SIXTEENTH CENTURY BINDINGS IN THE WESTERN ISLAMIC WORLD
Dr. Nuria Martínez-de-Castilla-Muñoz (UCM)

In 1502, the Muslims who lived in the Iberian Peninsula were obliged to convert to Christianity; however, from that date on, some crypto-Islamic communities, called Moriscos, remained in Spain until their final expulsion in 1609. Even if they were obliged to give up their religion, customs and language, they still copied Islamic texts in Spanish in Arabic script (aljamiado), or even in Arabic. When it came to binding their manuscripts, they did not follow the old Islamic techniques, but the Christian ones.

On the other hand, during the same century, Morocco went through a strained political relationship with the Ottoman empire. However, as far as their books were concerned, Moroccan binders tried to follow the Ottoman aesthetical models.

The aim of this presentation is to analyse the bindings among the Islamic communities of these two countries, from a double point of view –technical and aesthetic-, under the paradoxical cultural influence of Christians and Ottomans, respectively.

 

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44.

‘Death in Scotland, from the medieval to the modern: beliefs, attitudes and practices’ (CFP, Conference, Edinburgh, 31 Jan–2 Feb 2014)

‘Death in Scotland, from the medieval to the modern: beliefs, attitudes and practices’

New College, University of Edinburgh,

Friday 31 January 2014 – Sunday 2 February 2014

Plenary speakers include:

• Professor Jane Dawson, John Laing Professor of Reformation History, Edinburgh University: “‘With one foot in the grave”: death in life and life in death in Reformation Scotland’.

• Professor Richard Fawcett, O.D.E., School of Art History, University of St Andrews: ‘The architectural setting of prayers for the dead in later medieval Scotland’.

• Dr Lizanne Henderson, Lecturer in History, School of Interdisciplinary Studies, University of Glasgow:‘Fairies, Angels and the Land of the Dead: Robert Kirk’s Lychnobious People’.

• Professor Sarah Tarlow, Director ofthe Centre for Historical Archaeology, University of Leicester: ‘Beliefs about bodies: contradictions and conundrums in early modern Scotland’.

A plenary panel will discuss childhood death.

This conference invites those who are researching death from whatever disciplinary perspective to offer papers. These will be particularly welcome on the subjects of:

• Death, grief and mourning; • Death, poverty, age gender and status; • Burial and cremation; • Legal and medical aspects of death; • Folklore, customs and rituals; • Death, urban and rural comparisons; • Violent death, including war; • Death in literature and the visual arts; • Plague pestilence and famine; • Theology, liturgy and funeral ministry; • Childhood death; • Architecture, landscape and monuments

Established research and work-in-progress welcomed,

Abstracts of 200 words maximum should be sent by 31 October 2013 to Peter Jupp or Susan Buckham.

For more information, click here.

 

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45.

This Saturday (19th October) a free study day is being held sponsored by the Who Were the Nuns? Project in Brentwood, Essex. Please contact James Kelly on James.Kelly3@durham.ac.uk to find out if there are still places available.

On Saturday 2 November a second event will be held in central Manchester. I am attaching the flyer for the second event.  Please contact c.bowden@qmul.ac.uk if you would like to come. Find out how you can use the database to do Family History and more. All welcome.

 

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46.

 

Seminar Series 2013-14

Travel: Bodies and Objects in Motion

Convenors: Sandra Cavallo, Jane Hamlett, Stella Moss, Weipin Tsai

Seminar co-ordinator: Charlotte Brown

Seminars will take place at Royal Holloway, 11 Bedford Square, on Wednesdays at 5pm.

 2013

23 October,  Giorgio Riello and Anne Gerritsen (Warwick),‘Spaces of Global Interactions: The Material Landscapes of Global History’

13 November, Ruth Livesey (RHUL), ‘Dickens and America: Transport and the Making of Place in the 1840s’

11 December, Aaron Moore (Manchester), ‘Physical Dimensions of Self: Diaries and Self-Discipline in East Asian Armies, 1937-1945′

2014

29 January, Carl Thompson (Nottingham Trent), ‘Gender and the Romanticization of Travel Writing; Maria Graham’s Journal of a Residence in Chile’

26 February, joint session on letters: Charlotte Brown (RHUL)  ‘The Objects of Men’s Affections in their Letters Home 1760-1830′; Weipin Tsai (RHUL), ‘‘’Bright is the Moon over my Home Village: the Family Letters of Chinese Merchants in Late Qing China’.

12 March, Ann Massey (Middlesex), ‘Bodies at sea: Colonial Discourses and Ocean Liner Design’.

ALL WELCOME!

If you are coming from outside RHUL please notify Charlotte Brown: charlotte.brown.2010 @live.rhul.ac.uk| in advance so that we can let security at Bedford Square know that you are coming.

Newsletter 41

By Alexander Samson, on 5 September 2013

  1. Hugh Trevor-Roper Centenary Conference: Oxford 11 January 2014
  2. London Summer School in Intellectual History, a joint UCL-QMUL venture. Details here: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/history/events/london-summer-school
  3. Translating Cultures in the Hispanic World, 7-8 November 2013, University of Edinburgh
  4. CFP – Scientiae 2014, the third annual conference on the emergent knowledge practices of the early modern period (ca. 1450-1750), University of Vienna, 23-25 April 2014.
  5. Article submissions invited for Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal.  
  6. The Fifteenth Century Conference: Christ Church, Oxford 5th, 6th and 7th September 2013.
  7. Homage Volume for David Hook.
  8. Ben Jonson’s Epic ‘Foot Voyage’ to Scotland – a Digital Journey http://bit.ly/BJWblog
  9. Call for book proposals: Women & Gender in the Early Modern World
  10. Call for Papers, 49th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, MI, 8-11 May, 2014 ELIZABETH I and OTHER MONARCHS (Sponsored by Queen Elizabeth I Society).
  11. Call for Papers, Early Modern Women, Religion, and the Body 22-23 July 2014, Loughborough University.
  12. Textual Cultures in Early Modern Europe, Pusey Room, Keble College, 28 September.
  13. THE INTERNATIONAL VOICE IN SHAKESPEARE ON THE LONDON STAGE, Monday 30 September 2013, 18:00-21:00, Performances: 19:45, The Rose Theatre, Bankside, 56 Park Street, London SE1 9AS.
  14. CFP: Manuscript and Early Print Interactions- Special Session, 49th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo May 2014.
  15. Book Announcement. Emotions and Health 1200 – 1700: www.brill.com/emotions-and-health-1200-1700.
  16. The Botany of Empire in the Long Eighteenth Century. Symposium at Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection. Washington, D.C. | October 4–5, 2013.
  17. Call for Papers. “The Problem of Religion: Faith and Agency in History”, Boston College Biennial Conference on the History of Religion March 28-29, 2014.
  18. Japan and Britain, 1613: Parallels and Exchanges SOAS & The British Library, 19-21 September, 2013.
  19. Theatrum Mundi: Latin Drama in Renaissance Europe 12-14 September 2013, Magdalen College, University of Oxford.
  20. Call for Papers:  Revisiting the Debate on Early Modern Salons. The Fourth International MARGOT Conference Barnard College, New York, 18-20 June, 2014. Deadline:  27 September 2013.
  21. HISTORY STUDY DAY with the Who were the Nuns? Project
  22. CFP: Dan Geffrey with the New Poete: Reading and Rereading Chaucer and Spenser – deadline 28th Oct. To be held at University of Bristol, Friday 11th – Sunday 13th July 2014.
  23. Call for Papers. Romance and its Transformations, 1550-1750. June 30th and July 1st, 2014, Chawton House Library, UK. 
  24. CFP. Medieval & Early Modern Cultures of War and Peace: Women and War, Saturday 23rd November 2013 at Homerton College, University of Cambridge.
  25. CFP. ‘I take thee at thy word’: Trust in Renaissance Literature. Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark, 22-24 May 2014.
  26. Fellowships at the the University of Padua.
  27. The Lucy Hutchinson Conference, St Edmund Hall, Oxford, Thursday 28 November 2013.
  28. CFP. A Changing Book Market? Spain and Portugal, 1601-1650. Centre for the History of the Media, University College Dublin, 5-6 June 2014.
  29. Medieval Merchants and Money. A conference at the Institute of Historical Research, London, on 7-8 November 2013 to celebrate the contribution of Professor James L. Bolton to the study of medieval history.
  30. The Blood Conference: Theories of Blood in Late Medieval and Early Modern English Literature and Culture. St Anne’s College, Oxford: 8th –10th, January, 2014.
  31. CFP: Religions of the Book (Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing, Antwerp 2014).
  32. The Queen Elizabeth I Society is proud to announce the keynote speakers for our 2014 annual meeting (to be held in conjunction with the South Central Renaissance Conference, April 3-5).
  33. Fifth Early Modern Symposium: Work in Progress: Bringing Art into Being in the Early Modern Periodwhich will be held at The Courtauld Institute of Art on Saturday 26 October.
  34. Call for Papers: Christopher Marlowe at 450: An Anniversary Special Issue Early Modern Literary Studies (EMLS)
  35. The British Institute of Florence Shakespeare and His Contemporaries, 6th Annual Postgraduate Conference 10th April 2014.
  36. Forthcoming lecture series on Shakespeare and the Classical Tradition by Professor Jonathan Bate FBA CBE, Provost of Worcester College, Oxford,  to be held at the Warburg Institute.

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1. Hugh Trevor-Roper Centenary Conference: Oxford 11 January 2014

HUGH TREVOR-ROPER 1914-2014

A series of papers and discussions to mark the centenary of his birth (on 15 January) and to appraise aspects of his thought and writing. The occasion is arranged by the Dacre Trust and will be held on

                                               SATURDAY 11 JANUARY 2014

                                                         in

                                               CORPUS CHRISTI COLLEGE OXFORD

PROVISIONAL PROGRAMME

10.00 – 11.35 SESSION 1: MID-SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY REVOLUTIONS

Sir John Elliott, ‘Trevor-Roper and “The General Crisis of the Seventeenth Century”’

Blair Worden, ‘The Unpublished Book: The Puritan Revolution’

Mark Greengrass, ‘“Three Foreigners: The Philosophers of the Puritan Revolution”’

COFFEE

11.55 – 1.00 SESSION 2: ERASMIANISM AND ECUMENICALISM

Peter N. Miller, ‘Trevor-Roper and the Erasmian Tradition’

Noel Malcolm, ‘Another Unpublished Book: “The Ecumenical Movement and the Church of England, 1598-1618”’

BUFFET LUNCH IN CORPUS

2.00 – 3.55 SESSION 3: THE SECOND WORLD WAR

Richard Overy, ‘The Last Days of Hitler’

Sir Michael Howard, ‘Trevor-Roper and Wartime Intelligence’

Eberhard Jäckel, ‘Trevor-Roper and Hitler’

Gina Thomas, ‘Trevor-Roper and Himmler’s Masseur’

TEA

4.15 – 4.50 SESSION 4: THE PROSE

John Banville, ‘Trevor-Roper as Prose Stylist’

4.50 – 5.25 SESSION 5: CONCLUDING DISCUSSION

5.30 – 7.15 RECEPTION IN ORIEL COLLEGE OXFORD

to celebrate the centenary, and to mark the publication of ONE HUNDRED LETTERS FROM HUGH TREVOR-ROPER, a selection of his letters to a variety of correspondents written between 1943 and 2001. The book is edited by Richard Davenport-Hines and Adam Sisman and will be published by Oxford University Press. All who have attended part or all of the conference will be welcome at the reception.

ARRANGEMENTS

THE PAPERS AND DISCUSSIONS ARE OPEN TO ALL, AND THOSE WHO COME TO THEM ARE WELCOME TO DO SO FOR EITHER ALL OR PART OF THE PROCEEDINGS. THERE IS NO CHARGE FOR ATTENDANCE OR FOR LUNCH OR REFRESHMENTS, BUT THOSE WISHING TO ATTEND WILL NEED TO GIVE NOTICE. SPACE IS LIMITED AND PLACES WILL BE ALLOCATED FIRST-COME-FIRST SERVED. (A FINAL CLOSING DATE IN DECEMBER FOR ANY REMAINING SPACES WILL BE ANNOUNCED NEARER THE TIME.) THOSE WISHING TO ATTEND SHOULD EMAIL BLAIR WORDEN (WHO WILL BE HAPPY TO ANSWER QUERIES) AT

blair.worden@history.ox.ac.uk.

THEY SHOULD PLEASE (I) SAY WHETHER THEY WILL TAKE LUNCH; (2) SAY WHETHER THEY WILL ATTEND THE RECEPTION; (3) IF POSSIBLE SAY WHETHER THEY EXPECT TO ATTEND ALL THE SESSIONS OR, IF NOT, FOR WHICH OF THEM THEY PLAN TO BE PRESENT.

——-

In the autumn of 2014 a series of Dacre Centenary Lectures will be held, in association with the Oxford History Faculty, in the Examination Schools, Oxford, on Fridays at 5 p.m., provisionally under the title ‘IDEAS AND SOCIETY c. 1600-1800’. The speakers will be ANTHONY GRAFTON, MICHAEL HUNTER, JONATHAN ISRAEL, COLIN KIDD, NOEL MALCOLM, DAVID WOMERSLEY AND BRIAN YOUNG.

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2. London Summer School in Intellectual History

A joint UCL-QMUL venture. Details here: 

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/history/events/london-summer-school

 

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3. Translating Cultures in the Hispanic World, 7-8 November 2013, University of Edinburgh

Location: Teviot Dining Room, Teviot Row, 13 Bristo Square, Edinburgh EH8 9AJ

The dual mission of the radically novel journal Art in Translation consists in challenging the boundaries of conventional art history as practised in Europe and North America, and stimulating thinking about the problems and paradoxes of translation within the art historical discourse. Translating Cultures in the Hispanic World, is the fourth conference hosted by AIT, exploring the interface between the visual arts and theories of cultural translation.

The Hispanic world represents an exceptionally rich and fertile context in which to reflect on the role of translation not only as a vehicle for cultural exchange, the transmission of bodies of knowledge and memory, but also as a means of either asserting or resisting power in order to create something new. Drawing on translation theory, the conference seeks to encourage new ways of thinking about influence, reception, and mis-appropriation. Issues to be addressed include: 

domestication versus foreignization; transgressive modes of translation; translation between different media and contexts; translation-knowledge-power; translation as colonization.

The conference is transhistorical, shifting focus from medieval Spain to the wider Hispanic world in the early modern and modern period. 

Topics to be covered include:

- objects of cross-cultural communication in medieval Spain

- shifts and adaptations in Iberian iconographies

- transfer and transformations of Iberian models of art in Latin America

- cultural representations of social ?others?

- 19th-century photography, the image as transmitter of another presence

- historiography; the reception of Hispanic art.

Thursday, 7 November 2013,  9.00 ? 18.00

Welcome Address

Session 1: Visual Culture and Translation in Medieval Spain

Alejandro García Aviles (Professor of Art History, Universidad de Murcia), ?Lost & found in translation: visual interpretation in medieval astrological iconography?.

Mariam Rosser-Owen (Curator of Middle Eastern collections, Victoria &Albert Museum), ?Islamic ivories in Christian contexts: gift exchange and relic translation?.

Tom Nickson (Lecturer, Courtauld Institute), ?Texts and talismans in medieval Castile?.

Emily Goetsch (PhD Candidate, University of Edinburgh), ?Translating

Cartography: The Mappaemundi of the Beatus Commentary on the Apocalypse?.

Session 2: Spain and the New World

Tom Cummins (Dumbarton Oaks Professor of Pre-Columbian and Colonial Art History; Harvard University) ? The Matter of Metaphor: An Ambiguous Image of Empire in a 16th Century Peruvian Manuscript 

Felipe Pereda (Nancy H. and Robert E. Hall Professor of the Humanities, Johns Hopkins University), ?Translation/translatio: importing sacred images in the w world?.

Maria Judith Feliciano (Independent Scholar, Seattle), ?Towards a theory of Mudejar art? [Mudejar in Mexico]

Friday, 8 November 2013,  9.30 ?  17.00

Session 3: Foreignisation, Domestication, Adaptation?

Marjorie Trusted (Senior Curator of Sculpture, Victoria & Albert

Museum)  ?Melchiorre Caffa?s sculpture of Sta Rosa of Lima. The export of a baroque marble sculpture from Rome to Peru?

Carmen Fracchia (Senior Lecturer in Early Modern Spanish Visual Studies at Birckbeck, University of London), ?Whitening the African body in early modern Spain?

Laura Fernandez Gonzalez (Research Fellow, Institute of Advanced Studies, Edinburgh), ?Madrid and the wider world: domestic architecture and the Spanish empire in the sixteenth century?.

Session 4: Modernity, Memory and Historiography

Andrew Ginger (Professor of Iberian and Latin American Studies, University of Bristol, UK) ?Translating presence: photographing actors?.

Hilary Macartney (Research Associate, University of Glasgow), ?In true fac-simile? The invention of photography and the reproduction of Spanish art?.

Jens Baumgarten (Professor of Art History, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), Brazil), ?Translations of concepts: Brazil, Hanna Levy and the Neo-Baroque?.

Gabriela Siracusano (Director Instituto de Investigaciones sobre el Patrimonio Cultural Universidad Nacional de San Martín (UNSAM), Researcher at the National Research Council, Argentina) , ?Faraway tools for local tales: uses and appropriation of European theories and methods in the construction of a national art history in Argentina?.

Conference fees:

£30 (£15 concessions)

The conference is free for University of Edinburgh students (who will still need to register).

Online Registration and further information here: 

http://www.artintranslation.org/

Dr Laura Fernández-González

Tutor and Part-time Lecturer

Edinburgh College of Art

University of Edinburgh

Tel. 0044 (0) 7726705047

E: laura.fernandez-gonzalez@ed.ac.uk

W:http://edinburgh.academia.edu/LauraFernandezGonzalez

W: http://www.recreatingearlymodernfestivals.com/

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4. CFP – Scientiae 2014, the third annual conference on the emergent knowledge practices of the early modern period (ca. 1450-1750), University of Vienna, 23-25 April 2014.

Keynote Speakers: Thomas Wallnig (University of Vienna) andHoward Hotson (University of Oxford)

CALL FOR PAPERS

The deadline for all abstracts is 15 October 2013

Paper and panel proposals are invited for Scientiae 2014, the third annual conference on the emergent knowledge practices of the early modern period (ca. 1450-1750). The conference will take place on the 23-25 April 2014 at the University of Vienna in Austria, building upon the success of Scientiae 2012(Simon Fraser University) and Scientiae 2013 (Warwick), each of which brought together more than 100 scholars from around the world.

The premise of this conference is that knowledge during the period of the Scientific Revolution was inherently interdisciplinary, involving complex mixtures of practices and objects which had yet to be separated into their modern “scientific” hierarchies. Our approach, subsequently, needs to be equally wide-ranging, involving Biblical exegesis, art theory, logic, and literary humanism; as well as natural philosophy, alchemy, occult practices, and trade knowledge. Attention is also given to mapping intellectual geographies through the tools of the digital humanities. Scientiae is intended for scholars working in any area of early-modern intellectual culture, but is centred around the emergence of modern natural science. The conference offers a forum for the dissemination of research, acts as a catalyst for new investigations, and is open to scholars of all levels.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Intellectual geography: networks, intellectual history, and the digital humanities.
  • Theological origins and implications of the new sciences.
  • Interpretations of nature and the scriptures.
  • Antiquarianism and the emergence of modern science.
  • The impact of images on the formation of early modern knowledge.
  • Genealogies of “reason”, “utility”, and “knowledge”.
  • Humanism and the Scientific Revolution.
  • Paracelsianism, Neoplatonism, and alchemy more generally.
  • Interactions between the new sciences, magic and demonology.
  • The history of health and medicine.
  • Morality and the character of the natural world.
  • Early modern conceptions of, and practices surrounding, intellectual property.
  • Poetry and the natural sciences.
  • The development of novel approaches to cosmology and anthropology.
  • Botany: between natural history, art, and antiquarianism.
  • Music: between mathematics, religion, and medicine.
  • The relationship between early modern literature and knowledge.
  • Advances or reversals of logic and/or dialectic.

Abstracts for individual papers of 25 minutes should be between 250 and 350 words in length. For panel sessions of 1 hour and 45 minutes, a list of speakers (with affiliations), as well as a 500-word abstract, is required. Roundtable discussions or other formats may be accepted at the discretion of the organizing committee. All applicants are also required to submit a brief biography of 150 words of less. Abstracts must be submitted through our online submission form.

If you have any questions, please contact the conference convenor, Vittoria Feola (vittoria.feola@meduniwien.ac.at).

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5. Article submissions invited for Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal  

Invites submissions of articles on the topic of women and gender in the early modern period, 1400-1750. The Journal has now established an award of $1000 for the best article in each issue:

The Forum for Volume 9 will focus on women as patrons and curators.

Topics to be considered may include: women as collectors or patrons of art, music, and literature; women as patrons of social and religious institutions; women as preservers of curiosities and cultural artifacts. Proposals for other topics are welcome.

Please contact the editors at emwj@miami.edu if you are interested in proposing a topic.

Editors:

Anne J. Cruz, Professor of Spanishajcruz@miami.edu

Mary Lindemann, Professor of History mlindemann@miami.edu

Mihoko Suzuki, Professor of English msuzuki@miami.edu

Center for the HumanitiesUniversity of MiamiCoral Gables FL 33124

http://humanities.miami.edu/publications/emwj

To subscribe to the journal, send an email to: gentrup@asu.edu

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6. The Fifteenth Century Conference: Christ Church, Oxford 5th, 6th and 7th September 2013

Thursday 5th September

12.30pm – 2pm Arrival and Registration (Rooms are not available before 12.30pm but if you arrive early you can leave your luggage in the porter’s lodge off St Aldates)

2pm – Welcome (Rowena E Archer)

2.15pm – Professor Chris Given-Wilson: Mayors, merchants, ports and pirates:Henry IV’s urban affinity.

3.30pm Tea

4.15pm  – 6.15pm (Parallel sessions)

Session one: Christian Steer: Monuments in Fifteenth Century London

Kirsten Claiden-Yardley: Tombs and the expression of Noble Identity: Change and continuity 1485-1572

Matthew Ward: The livery collar: politics and identity during the fifteenth century

Session two: Lorraine Attreed: “Men Wage War, Women Make Peace”: Gender and the Expansion of Diplomacy in the Fifteenth Century                                                                                                                                                                   

 Lucia Diaz Pascual: The Bohuns and Family Memory: The Importance of Lineage

 David Russell: Margery Kempe in Lynn Society                     

6.30pm Drinks Reception (Sponsored by the Oxford Centre for Medieval History)

7.00pm Dinner

8.15pm? The Cabot Project (Margaret Condon); The AALT project (Susanne Jenks); the Newport Project (Toby Jones)

Friday 6th September

8am – 9am Breakfast

9am  – 11am (Parallel sessions)

Session one: Sean Cunningham:  “No impediment to work his will…”: manipulation of the law and the reality of justice in the preservation of Henry VII’s kingship

Thomas Penn, The Story of Alum in the reigns of Edward IV and Henry VII

Sam Harper: William Capell: victim of Henry VII’s avarice or architect of his own downfall? 

Session two: Elizabeth Solopova : From popular piety to liturgical ritual: the ownership of the Wycliffte Bible in the 15th century

 Jenni Nuttall:By Royal Appointment? Thomas Hoccleve’s ballades for Henry V

Linne Mooney: London Guildhall Clerks and Middle English Literature.                                             

11am Coffee

11.30am – 1pm: (Parallel sessions)    

Session one: Martin Allen: The English Crown and the coinage, 1399-1485     

Guillaume Sarrat de Tramezaigues: Around the monetary siege of Orleans 1428-29: English stability and French manipulations

Session two: Anthony Gross, Charles III, Duc de Bourbon and the Last of the Yorkists: Portraiture and Mistaken Identity in the Early Renaissance      

David Rundle, There was an Englishman, a Scotsman and a Dutchman or what the scripts of an Italian Humanism owe to the North

1pm Lunch

Afternoon:  Christ Church Upper Library Exhibition: ‘The Long fifteenth century’ &

Martin Andrews &Alan May: Early Printing Press and ‘Print your own Gutenberg Bible Page’ 

4.15pm Tea:

5  – 6.30 pm (Parallel sessions)

Session one: Anne Curry, Simon Harris Guilhem Pépin, Philip Morgan, Paul Spence : ‘The  Gascon rolls project and the End of English Gascony 

Guilhem Pepin, The imposition of Henry IV’s authority in Gascony: The action at Bayonne in 1400

Session two: Eliza Hartrich ‘Urban factions and National Politics in mid-fifteenth century England

Maureen Jurkowski :Were Friars paid Salaries?: Evidence from  Clerical Taxation Records.              

7pm Conference Wine Reception

7.30pm Conference dinner and Dessert

Saturday 7th September

8am-9am Breakfast

9am- 11am

Session one: Andy King: Overlordship or Containment? The Scottish Policies of Henry IV and Henry V.

Susanne Jenks: Exceptions in General Pardons in the Fifteenth Century

Session two: Alison Spedding:A testamentary triptych: the will of a fifteenth-century Hull merchant.                                                

David Harry “This short, dangerous and transitory life”: Death and the English  Nobility, c.1455-85: Nicholas Orme: A New Source for Fifteenth Century History

11am Coffee

11.30am – 12.45pm: Professor Ralph Griffiths: St David’s and its Bishops during the Wars of the Roses

1pm Lunch

2pm conference disperses.

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7. HOMAGE VOLUME FOR DAVID HOOK

Text, Manuscript, and Print in Medieval and Modern Iberia: Studies in Honour of David Hook, edited by Barry Taylor, Geoffrey West, and Jane Whetnall (New York: HSMS, 2013).  xx+432 pp.

We are pleased to announce the imminent publication of a homage volume for David Hook. In this volume sixteen friends and colleagues pay tribute to David Hook’s contribution to Hispanic studies with a collection of articles on the written culture of medieval and early modern Iberia. The volume will be published in November 2013.

The pre-publication price is $35 for USA-based individuals and institutions, and $50 for those based elsewhere. The names of all individuals and institutions who subscribe before 10th August 2013 will appear in the Tabula Gratulatoria.

Cheques, in US dollars, made payable to the Hispanic Seminary of Medieval Studies, should be sent to:

Hispanic Seminary of Medieval Studies

Attn. John O’Neill

613 West 155th St

New York NY 10032

Payment can also be made by credit card (Mastercard, Visa or American Express). Please contact John O’Neill (oneill@hispanicsociety.org) for details.

Please indicate exactly how you would like your name to appear in the Tabula Gratulatoria and provide an e-mail and mailing address.

Contents/Tabla de materias

A. T. Fear, ‘Visigothic Birdspotting’; Roger Wright, ‘The Glossary in Emilianense 24’; Anthony John Lappin, ‘Between the Chisel and the Quill: The Development of the Cult of Peter of Osma during the Middle Ages’; Juan-Carlos Conde, ‘A Neglected Old Spanish Biblical Translation: The “Biblia de Alfonso Ximénez”’; Barry Taylor, ‘Spanish Glosses to Aesop and Prosper of Aquitaine in a Medieval Schoolbook (Lambeth Palace Library, MS 431)’; Jane Whetnall, ‘The Usus Scribendi of the Copyist of the Cancionero de Herberay’; Kirstin Kennedy, ‘“Don Egidio de Roma con el comentario del Tostado en romance para el rey don Juan”: The Spanish Translation of the De regimine principum in the Victoria and Albert Museum (MSL/1950/2463)’; Julian Weiss, ‘Vernacular Commentaries and Glosses in Late Medieval Castile, i: A Checklist of Castilian Authors’; Manuel Hijano Villegas, ‘A Sixteenth-Century Compiler of the Estoria de España: Further Observations on British Library, MS Egerton 289’; David Barnett, ‘Seven Prose Miracles of the Virgin in the Cançoner Vega-Aguiló’; John L. Flood, ‘Amadís in Frankfurt’; Juan Carlos Bayo, ‘The Early Editions of Lazarillo de Tormes and the Problems of their Priority’; Dennis E. Rhodes, ‘Juan Lorenzo Palmireno Bibliographer’; Juliet Perkins, ‘From Brown Ink to Printed Page: The Trajectory of an Eighteenth-Century Opera’; Geoffrey West, ‘Spanish Books in the Old Royal Library: A Preliminary Survey’; Richard Hitchcock, ‘Gallardo and Gayangos: Reflections on Matters Unresolved’.

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8. Ben Jonson’s Epic ‘Foot Voyage’ to Scotland – a Digital Journey

On 8 July 1618 Ben Jonson set out from London to walk to Edinburgh.  Details of his journey were unknown until the recent discovery in Chester Archives of a manuscript account of Jonson’s ‘Foot Voyage’ written by an anonymous fellow walker.  We now have a full picture of the people he met, and the places he visited, as he made his way northwards to York, Durham and Newcastle, then on into Scotland to Edinburgh, finally crossing the Forth for a whistlestop tour of Fife.
Jonson was then at the height of his career, and the welcome given to him on the road was fitting for a man of such fame. At Belvoir Castle, Welbeck Abbey, and other grand houses he was welcomed and banqueted by the nobility and gentry. In market towns and northern cities the civic elite turned out to entertain him. In Scotland, throngs mobbed him on Edinburgh’s High Street as they toasted his journey’s end, while nobles and town dignitaries feasted him in their palaces and houses.

The researchers currently completing an edition of the ‘Foot Voyage’ for publication by CUP next year would like to invite you to join them, and Ben, in a digital recreation of the walk this summer.

•    Jonson’s ‘Foot Voyage’ will be tweeted and posted day by day from 8 July to 5 October 2013:
https://twitter.com/BenJonsonsWalk
https://www.facebook.com/BenJonsonsWalk

•    you can accompany him up the Great North Road, sharing his experiences of historic sites and the tales he was told, the colourful characters he met, plenty of generous hospitality, and lots of great British summer weather

•    you can find out more about the walk and the project on the linked website and blog: http://bit.ly/BJWblog

Feel free to join us – and please pass this email on to anyone who might also be interested!

This project has been undertaken by James Loxley and Anna Groundwater (Edinburgh) and Julie Sanders (Nottingham), and is supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

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9. Call for book proposals: Women & Gender in the Early Modern World

The study of women and gender offers some of the most vital and innovative challenges to current scholarship on the early modern period. For more than a decade now, Women and Gender in the Early Modern World has served as a forum for presenting fresh ideas and original approaches to the field. Interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary in scope, this Ashgate book series strives to reach beyond geographical limitations to explore the experiences of early modern women and the nature of gender in Europe, the Americas, Asia, and Africa. We welcome proposals for both single-author volumes and edited collections which expand and develop this continually evolving field of study.

In addition to works focused on early modern Europe, we are eager for submissions about women in non-western cultures, the colonial Americas, and the role of women and gender in science, magic and technology.

To submit a proposal, or for more information, please contact: Erika Gaffney, Publishing Manager, egaffney@ashgate.com

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10. Call for Papers, 49th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, MI, 8-11 May, 2014 ELIZABETH I and OTHER MONARCHS (Sponsored by Queen Elizabeth I Society).

Our panel in 2014 will consider Elizabeth in relation to the other monarchs–those who preceded her, those who were her contemporaries, and perhaps even those who followed her, both in England and abroad. It is supposed that Elizabeth has famously compared herself to Richard II, and we know that she openly drew on the Tudor legacy in her speeches and political strategies. What elements of Elizabeth’s queenship are derived from or are conceived in opposition to the ruling styles or politics embraced by certain medieval monarchs as well as Elizabeth’s contemporaries abroad? What elements of her own rule are imitated or criticized by the later kings and queens? What can we glean from Elizabeth’s diplomatic relationships with the other monarchs? We invite papers  exploring the ways Elizabeth’s queenship was shaped in relation to other queens and kings.

Please email the abstracts (about 300 words) to Anna Riehl Bertolet ariehl@auburn.edu no later than September 15, 2013. Along with your abstract, please submit a completed  Participant Information Form (found on the Congress website, but also attached to this email for your convenience).

Hope to see you at Kalamazoo!

With best wishes,

Anya

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11. Call for Papers, Early Modern Women, Religion, and the Body 22-23 July 2014, Loughborough University

Plenary speakers: Professor Mary Fissell (Johns Hopkins) and Dr Katharine Hodgkin (University of East London)

With public lecture by Alison Weir (evening of 22 July, Martin Hall Theatre): ‘“The Prince expected in due season”: The Queen’s First Duty’

This two-day conference will explore the response of early modern texts to the relationship between religion and female bodily health. Scholars have long observed that understandings of the flesh and the spirit were inextricably intertwined in the early modern period, and that women’s writings or writings about women often explored this complex relationship. For instance, how did early modern women understand pain, illness, and health in a religious framework, and was this different to the understanding of those around them? Did women believe that their bodies were sinful? And were male and female religious experiences different because they took place in different bodies?

We invite proposals that address the relationship between religion and health, and the spirit and flesh, with a focus on female experience in any genre in print or manuscript. Genres might include medical, literary, religious, autobiographical, instructive, and rhetorical writings.

Topics might include, but are not limited to:

Methods of recording or maintaining bodily and spiritual health

The function of religion/faith in physiological changes (e.g. pregnancy/childbirth/nursing/menstruation)

Illness, providence, and interpretation

Suffering as part of religious experience and conversion

Spiritual melancholy, madness, demonic possession, or witchcraft

The physical effects of prophesising/preaching

Chastity and religious life

Spiritual and physical births/reproductive tropes

Ensoulment and pregnancy

The miraculous or martyred female body

The body and sin

Uses of the Bible in medical treatises

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers, complete panels, or roundtable discussions. Suggestions for discussions on pedagogical approaches to teaching the above topics are also welcome.

Please send abstracts of 300 words for 20-minute papers, or longer proposals for panels or roundtables, to Rachel Adcock, Sara Read, and Anna Warzycha at emwomen@lboro.ac.uk by 31st January 2014.

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 12. Textual Cultures in Early Modern Europe, Pusey Room, Keble College, 28 September.

This one day colloquium will explore the cultural implications of the production, dissemination and use of texts, whether manuscript or printed. Focussing on early modern England, France, and Italy, papers will discuss the relationship between image and text; cultures of production, including concerns behind publishing such as censorship, self-fashioning and marketing; how texts moved within and across borders; and how early modern readers engaged with the texts they encountered.

Speakers include: Sara Apetrei; Ian Archer; James Ambrose; Sara Barker; Heather Dalton; Nicola Gardini; Michael Hawcroft; Cristina Neagu; Jason Peacey; Tracey Sowerby; and Tiffany Stern.

For further details please see the attached poster.

To register, or to make any enquiries please contact tracey.sowerby@keble.ox.ac.uk by 15 September.

Registration is £16 waged and £10 students/unwaged. This includes a buffet lunch, coffee & afternoon tea.

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13. THE INTERNATIONAL VOICE IN SHAKESPEARE ON THE LONDON STAGE, Monday 30 September 2013, 18:00-21:00, Performances: 19:45, The Rose Theatre, Bankside, 56 Park Street, London SE1 9AS

PROGRAMME

18:00: Welcoming Speech

Enza De Francisci (Convenor)

Session I: Papers by Departments at University College London

18:05: Chris Stamakatis (English)

‘Some rare noteworthy object in thy travel’: Shakespeare’s Italy and Early Modern Travel Writing

18:25: Enza De Francisci (Italian, SELCS)

Giovanni Grasso: The Other Othello in London

18:45: Lily Kahn (Hebrew and Jewish Studies)

Linguistic Aspects of the First Hebrew Shakespeare Translations

19:05: Geraldine Brodie (Dutch, SELCS)

Shakespeare and Surtitles: Toneelgroep’s Roman Tragedies in London

19:25: Round-Table Discussion

Translating, Transporting and Transposing Shakespeare

Chair: Rene Weis (English)

Session II: Performances of Shakespeare

19:45: WERE I HUMAN based on The Tempest

Adapted, Directed and Illustrated by Terry D’Alfonso

Read by Diana Berriman and Simonetta Allder

In Memory of Giorgio Strehler

20:05: Macbeth and the Physical Theatre (WOH Productions

Adapted by Anthony Khaseria and Manuela Ruggiero

Directed by Manuela Ruggiero

Produced by Carolina Artegiani

20:25: Post-Show Discussion

Adapting Shakespeare Today

Chair: Florian Mussgnug (Italian)

20:45: Closing Remarks

Enza De Francisci 

This conference is generously supported by the Mazzini Garibaldi Charitable Foundation

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14. CFP: Manuscript and Early Print Interactions- Special Session, 49th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo May 2014 

In the first few centuries after the advent of print, manuscript and print cultures existed side by side. Paper proposals are invited on any aspect of manuscript and early print interactions in any language, on any kind of text (i.e, literary, medical, scientific).

Papers might consider, but are no means limited to:

-        Attitudes to, and anxieties about, early print in comparison with manuscripts

-        Manuscripts copied from prints

-        Joint manuscript and print codices

-        The influence of manuscript mis-en-page on printing practices and vice versa

-        The cultural cachet attached to manuscripts after the arrival of print

-        Surreptitious manuscript copies of seditious or private texts after the advent of print

Please send abstracts of no more than 250 words to mary.wellesley.09@ucl.ac.uk, by September 14th, 2013.  

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15. EMOTIONS AND HEALTH, 1200-1700. Edited by Elena Carrera. SMRT, 168. Leiden/Boston: BRILL, 2013. ISBN 9789004250826

For all interested in the history of the emotions, medical  history,  and medieval and early modern European cultural history:

CONTRBUTORS: Nicole Archambeau, Elena Carrera, Penelope Gouk, Angus Gowland, Nicholas E. Lombardo, William F. MacLehose, Michael R. Solomon and Erin Sullivan.

  Emotions and Health, 1200-1700 examines theological and medical

  approaches to the ‘passions’ as alterations affecting both mind and

  body. It focuses on sorrow, fear and anger, on constructions of the

  melancholic subject, and on the effects of music on health.

  For more information see www.brill.com/emotions-and-health-1200-1700

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16.  The Botany of Empire in the Long Eighteenth Century. Symposium at Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection. Washington, D.C. | October 4–5, 2013

This two-day symposium will bring together an international body of scholars working on botanical investigations and publications within the context of imperial expansion in the long eighteenth century. The period saw widespread exploration, a tremendous increase in the traffic in botanical specimens, significant taxonomic innovations, and horticultural experimentation. We will revisit these developments from a comparative perspective that will include Europe, the Ottoman Empire, Africa, Asia, and the Americas.

Main themes for discussion are global networks of plant discovery and transfer; the quest for medicinal plants and global crops such as ginseng, tea and opium; the economies of gift, trade, patronage, and scientific prestige in which plants circulated; imperial aspirations or influences as reflected on garden design; and visual strategies and epistemologies.

The symposium will coincide with the fiftieth anniversary of the Rare Book Room at Dumbarton Oaks, and will feature an exhibit of botanical works from our collections.

Registration for the symposium is now open. For more information you can visit the website, click on the links below, or write to BotanySymposium@doaks.org.

Registration

Program

Confirmed speakers include Sahar Bazzaz (College of the Holy Cross); Daniela Bleichmar (University of Southern California); Deniz Çalış-Kural (Istanbul Bilgi University); Sarah Easterby-Smith (University of St. Andrews); Ian Glenn (University of Cape Town); Rachel Koroloff (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign); Shigehisa Kuriyama (Harvard University); Colin McEwan (Dumbarton Oaks); Amy Meyers (Yale Center for British Art); Miranda Mollendorf (Harvard University); Carla Nappi (University of British Columbia); Romita Ray (Syracuse University); Bianca Rinaldi (University of Camerino); and Anatole Tchikine (Dumbarton Oaks).

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17. Call for Papers. “The Problem of Religion: Faith and Agency in History”, Boston College Biennial Conference on the History of Religion March 28-29, 2014

The History Department of Boston College invites papers and panels for its fifth Biennial Conference on the History of Religion to be held on March 28-29, 2014. In recent years, scholars have increasingly considered how religious institutions, beliefs, or practices challenge our conceptions of the past while also recognizing that religion is but one of a number of forces that interact, collide, and impel human history. As we try to determine when religion has been important in human history and when it has not, we grapple with understanding how internal matters of faith provoke and direct acts of human agency, manifest in the exercise of devotional practice, institutional power, and other arenas. Finally, scholars of religion are considering the most appropriate ways to contemplate, research, and write about faith, belief, and agency during what some intellectuals argue is a secular age. We will consider the possibilities and boundaries of using religion as a lens for understanding agency in human history.

We welcome proposals for individual papers and full panels from both established scholars and graduate students in all disciplines on topics from the medieval period to the present that touch upon the question of religion (in Christian and non-Christian forms) and agency in history. The geographic scope is broadly defined. Suggested themes include, but are not limited to, the role of religious institutions, practices, and beliefs in:

· church-state relations           · political violence

· the law and public policy      · religious thought

· habits and practices            · the challenges of historical method

Individual paper proposals should include a 300-word proposal, paper title, and one page c.v. Panel proposals for two to three presenters should include a 250-word panel abstract (including panel title), a 300-word proposal for each individual paper (including paper title), and a one page c.v. for each presenter. Deadline for submission is October 4, 2013.

Please submit your proposals to the Conference Committee at bchistoryofreligion@gmail.com<mailto:bchistoryofreligion@gmail.com>. Further conference details including a schedule, registration form, and travel information will be available at a later date at http://www.bc.edu/schools/cas/history/about/religion_conference.html.

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 18. Japan and Britain, 1613: Parallels and Exchanges SOAS & The British Library, 19-21 September, 2013.

The Conference will address the history of Japan and Britain in and around the year 1613. Both countries were undergoing massive cultural, religious and political transformations at the time, and it is instructive to look at their respective systems of restructuring and recreation in parallel and comparatively. 

Moreover, Japan and Britain directly encountered each other for the first time in 1613, with arrival of an English East India Company vessel, the Clove, bearing letters and gifts from King James for the Shogun. The conference will therefore also address issues of encounter and communication.

This event takes place on the exact 400th anniversary of this momentous encounter, for it was on 19 September 1613 that the English received reciprocal presents from the Shogun (which are extant), and on 21st that they departed Edo with great rejoicing. The conference is a major element in Japan400, a series of commemorations scheduled for across the UK and Japan to mark this landmark year. 

The Conference is sponsored by the Percival David Academic Fund and supported by the Great Britain Sasakawa Foundation 

All welcome. Registration not necessary

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 19. Theatrum Mundi: Latin Drama in Renaissance Europe 12-14 September 2013, Magdalen College, University of Oxford

Organized by the Society for Neo-Latin Studies in tandem with the Centre for Early Modern Studies, Oxford, the conference will bring together scholars working on early modern Latin drama. The conference will include a staged reading of an Oxford college play translated into English by Elizabeth Sandis (Oxford) and directed by Elisabeth Dutton (Fribourg), both researchers on the Early Modern Drama at Oxford (EDOX) project. An exhibition of institutional drama manuscripts and early printed books will be on display in St John’s; participants will also have the chance to visit the Archive of Performances of Greek and Roman Drama and to participate in a pedagogical forum, ‘Teaching Classical Drama’, in the Classics Faculty. The keynote speakers are: Thomas Earle (Oxford), Alison Shell (UCL), and Stefan Tilg (Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Neo-Latin Studies, Innsbruck).

The programme and registration details can be found at: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/ren/snls/events/theatrummundi/ Some postgraduate bursaries are available. The conference has been generously funded by the MHRA, CEMS, Society for Renaissance Studies, and the Association for Manuscripts and Archives in Research Collections. Please contact Sarah Knight (Leicester) with any questions (sk218@le.ac.uk).

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20. Call for Papers:  Revisiting the Debate on Early Modern Salons. The Fourth International MARGOT Conference Barnard College, New York, 18-20 June, 2014. Deadline:  27 September 2013.

Organizers: Julie Campbell, Anne Larsen, and Diana Robin

We would like to organize a panel on “Revisiting the Debate on Early Modern Salons.”

The place of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century salons and salon sociabilité in the production of culture has been a topic of renewed interest for literary historians for well over a decade now. As we and other scholars have begun to take into consideration women’s leadership and patronage in such contexts, in Italy, France, and England, the notions about what constitutes women’s empowerment regarding the production of literary culture, especially, but also their influence on social, political, and religious issues (such as marriage, education, the law, and religious choices) have come under new scrutiny.

 
Salon-style sociabilité was already in practice in sixteenth-century Italy (with gatherings referred to as ridotti, cenacoli, or veglie) and France (the cénacles and other gatherings in the hôtels particuliers of noble and royal hostesses, as well as coteries and circles in major cities such as Lyon and Poitiers) long before the architectural form and term salon caught up with it in seventeenth-century France. In England the Sidney/Wroth/Russell/Herbert circle exercised a profound influence on sociability.

The MARGOT conference provides the opportunity to examine our contemporary views of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century salon culture in Europe. We would be interested in papers on any of the following:

–salon sociabilité and women’s influence on cultural production, religious controversies, or political contexts.

–consideration of the longue durée of salon sociabilité.

–the international influence on salon sociabilité not only in France, but in Italy, Spain, or England. 

Please send abstracts of no more than 250 words and a one-page C.V. by Friday 27 September 2013, by email attachment, to each of the following:

Julie D. Campbell                    Anne Larsen                            Diana Robin

Professor of English                Professor of French                 Scholar-in-Residence,

Easter Illinois University        Hope College                          Newberry Library

jdcampbell@eiu.edu               alarsen@hope.edu                  

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21. HISTORY STUDY DAY with the Who were the Nuns? Project

Find out how you can use the database and other project resources for family and local history

Saturday 2nd November 2013

Salford Diocesan Archives, at St Augustine’s Church, Grosvenor Square, Oxford Road, Manchester M15 6BW

10.00 a.m. coffee, 10.30 a.m. first talk

Dr Caroline Bowden and Dr James Kelly talking about the project and how it can be used to find North West families

Dr Janet Hollinshead, Choosing their future: women in the Blundell family in early modern Lancashire

Peter J Tyldesley, The Tyldesleys and their faith in the 17th and 18th centuries

There will be a chance to see the archives at lunchtime with Father David Lannon, the archivist and to try out the database. 

There is no cost for the day: refreshments will be available during breaks. Lunch can be purchased locally. All welcome, but please confirm attendance in advance with Dr Caroline Bowden from whom further details can be obtained. c.bowden@qmul.ac.uk

The archives are ten minutes walk from Oxford Road station.

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22. CFP: Dan Geffrey with the New Poete: Reading and Rereading Chaucer and Spenser – deadline 28th Oct. To be held at University of Bristol, Friday 11th – Sunday 13th July 2014.

Confirmed Plenary Speakers:                                            

Prof. Judith Anderson, Indiana University, Bloomington

Dr. Helen Barr, Lady Margaret Hall, University of Oxford

Prof. Helen Cooper, Magdalene College, University of Cambridge

An international conference at the University of Bristol, Friday 11th – Sunday 13th July 2014.  Supported by the Department of English and the Centre for Medieval Studies.

There is a persistent discussion between scholars of the medieval and early modern periods about how both periods are conceptualised and about the interrelations between them.  How can reading, or rereading, the connections between these two poets contribute to this discussion?  Chaucer is customarily read as a poet of the High Middle Ages, whose valorisation of the vernacular had a profound influence on the poetry of subsequent centuries.  Spenser is often read as a poet of the High Renaissance for whom continuity with the past (literary and historical) was a paramount issue.  What are the connections between these poets and how can they help to shape revisionist discussions about the periodisation of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance?  This conference aims to reread the connections between Chaucer and Spenser, in the light of recent critical methodologies and reformulations of historical continuity and difference.  The organisers hope to publish a selection of the resultant papers as a single volume, so the following questions seek to elicit contributions that collectively have a sense of coherence, without constraining what contributors wish to discuss. 

  • How has the relationship between Chaucer and Spenser been read and how can it be re-read?
  • How do these two poets together help us periodize / deperiodize / reperiodize the medieval and the early modern?
  • What kind of continuum do they share?  Is their relationship continuous, radically other, both or neither?  Can we reconceptualise descriptions of poetic similarity or difference through discussing Chaucer and Spenser together?
  • Can we think of their connection in terms of anticipation as well as influence?
  • What can we learn about the phenomenon of intertextuality by rereading the connections between these two poets?
  • Does Spenser present us with one Chaucer or many?  How has this affected later versions of Chaucer?
  • Do these two poets take analogous approaches to the task of making poetry?
  • How do earlier fifteenth- and sixteenth-century readings and adaptations of the Chaucerian canon affect Spenser’s readings of it?
  • How might a greater variety of critical approaches reveal new connections between the poets?  (e.g. ecocriticism, posthumanism, studies of material cultures, studies of the digital humanities, cognitive approaches, histories of the emotions, disability studies)
  • How does Chaucer imagine his poetic followers?  What would Chaucer think of Spenser?

Please send 300 word proposals for 20 minute papers to chaucerspenser@gmail.com, including 5-10 keywords highlighting the content of the paper.  The deadline for receipt of proposals is Monday, 28th October 2013. 

For updates and further information, please see the conference website

Dan Geffrey with the New Poete

or, follow us on twitter

@chaucerspenser

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23. Call for Papers. Romance and its Transformations, 1550-1750. June 30th and July 1st, 2014, Chawton House Library, UK. 

Keynote Speakers:

Professor Ros Ballaster, Oxford University

Professor Emerita Mary Ellen Lamb, Southern Illinois University

With a public keynote by Professor Nandini Das, Liverpool University

As a genre, romance is defined by transformation: it is both a recurrent motif within romance and a characteristic of a form that has itself been transformed over the centuries and in different locations. But romance maintains a degree of formal and thematic integrity, as well as its appeal with different generations of readers and across social and cultural boundaries. This conference will explore the appropriation and transformation of romance in Britain and beyond between 1550 and 1750, as writers adopted and rewrote the motifs, storylines, characters, and formal elements of the genre. In doing so, it will bring into dialogue the different ideas about and critical approaches to the genre that are developing our understanding of the significance of romance within historical periods traditionally considered in isolation from one another, including the Renaissance, the early modern period and the eighteenth century.

We welcome proposals for papers on any aspect of the way romance has been adopted and transformed between 1550 and 1750. Potential areas of investigation include but are not limited to:

Romance and…

commonplace books, conduct books, drama, poetry (including epic), letters, life writing, novels and other forms of prose fiction, political activism, political writing, print and, manuscript culture, scientific writing, social interactions, translation. 

The deadline for 500 word abstracts is December 31st, 2013

Please send abstracts to Alice Eardley: a.eardley@soton.ac.uk or Julie Eckerle: ecker014@morris.umn.edu

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24. CFP. Medieval & Early Modern Cultures of War and Peace: Women and War, Saturday 23rd November 2013 at Homerton College, University of Cambridge 

This one day conference is part of an ongoing annual academic series focusing upon the many and various medieval and early modern cultural investments in armed combat and conflict resolution. This interdisciplinary conference explores these cultural investments with particular reference to questions of the role of women in terms of both warfare and the construction of peace. It is envisaged that delegates will be addressing this subject from a number of disciplinary perspectives, and presentations on the following subjects relating to the medieval and early modern periods would be particularly welcome: 



•    the representations of martial women across a range of media, especially but not exclusively those Thomas Heywood chose as ‘the most worthy women in the world’ in 1640 (e.g. the Biblical Deborah and Judith, the Pagan Bunduca and Penthisilea, and the Christian, Elpheda, Margaret (wife of Henry VI) and Elizabeth I)

•    writings by women who discuss their experiences of war;


•    representations of women’s experience in medieval conflicts, as non-combatants and combatants, victims and aggressors, subjects and authors. In particular, this panel invites contributions on Joan of Arc and/or her literary legacy; Christine de Pizan and women’s writings on the ethics of war; or any other subject concerned with women’s experience of medieval warfare and/or its ethical/literary representation;


•    the way women are represented on stage in plays that deal explicitly with their experience of war; this session will relate to a performance of Jane Lumley’s Iphigeneia that will be staged on the evening of the conference.

These and other related subjects will be considered for presentation at this conference. Abstracts of no more than 200 words should be sent to the conference organizers, Professor Geoff Ward (gw355@cam.ac.uk) and Professor Marion Wynne-Davies (m.wynne-davies@surrey.ac.uk) no later than Friday 27th September. All abstracts should include the proposer’s name, title, mailing address, email address, institutional affiliation, student/employed status. Please note that there will be four panel sessions: of these some will require papers (no longer than 2000 words) to be circulated beforehand by the panel chair in order to facilitate discussion, while others will ask panel members to address key questions circulated by the panel chair.

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25. CFP. ‘I take thee at thy word’: Trust in Renaissance Literature. Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark, 22-24 May 2014

What qualities compose trust and confidence in the Renaissance?  What signs call it into question?  This seminar seeks to identify points of congruence and contention in sixteenth and seventeenth century notions of trust and how they might be betrayed. From the stage Machiavel who discloses his plans to the audience to the kinsman who pledges his fealty, or the lover who exchanges his faithful vow, how did trust differ across such different domains as religious and political life or familial relations?  It is hoped that papers will cross a range of genres including early modern poetry, prose, and drama, as well as major and minor authors. The intended outcome will be to publish suitable papers in a special issue of Textual Practice.

This seminar will be part of the interdisciplinary MatchPoints Conference 2014 at Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark, 22-24 May 2014 (www.matchpoints.au.dk).  Plenary speakers include Robert Putnam (Harvard University), Eric Uslaner (University of Maryland), Gerd Achenbach (Lessing-Hochschule zu Berlin, Philosophische Praxis), Mikael Rostila (Stockholm University), Alison Findlay (Lancaster University), Svend Andersen (Aarhus University),Cheryl Mattingly (University of Southern California), Sverre Raffnsøe (Copenhagen Business School).

Organised by Joseph Sterrett

Please send 150 word proposals to engjs [at] hum.au.dk by 15 January 2014.

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26. Fellowships at the the University of Padua.

The University of Padua has launched a program of fellowships aimed at non-Italian post-doc students needing to spend a period of time in Padua for their research. These fellowship work very much like the Marie Curie fellowships, but are open to students from all over the world. They can apply starting from September.

All the best,
Alessandra
***
Alessandra Petrina
Associate Professor of English Literature
Università degli Studi di Padova
Dpt Studi Linguistici e Letterari
via Beato Pellegrino, 26
35136 Padova
Italy
 
alessandra.petrina@unipd.it

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 27. The Lucy Hutchinson Conference, St Edmund Hall, Oxford, Thursday 28 November 2013

Lucy Hutchinson is well known to seventeenth-century historians and literary scholars as the author of Memoirs of the Life of Colonel Hutchinson, a classic biography which sets the momentous life of her husband, a committed Puritan, republican and regicide, against the wider backdrop of the English Civil War and Restoration. This work, and a compelling though fragmentary autobiography, have been more or less continually in print since their publication from manuscript in 1806. Only recently, however, has the scale and range of her interests been recognized. Like her contemporary – and political rival – Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle, Hutchinson aspired to the new European model of the woman intellectual, and translated Lucretius’ De rerum natura, the most passionately anti-religious text of antiquity. From a radically different perspective, she later composed Order and Disorder, a major Biblical poem on a parallel subject to Milton’s Paradise Lost. Underpinning her later works was an exceptional engagement with contemporary Latin and English theological writings. Many fundamental questions about her life and writings have yet to be addressed, and this will be the first ever conference to discuss them. It will bring together many scholars who are working on a new edition of her collected works and others with an interest in seventeenth-century literature, politics and women’s writing. Speakers will include Penelope Anderson, Martyn Bennett, Mark Burden, Elizabeth Clarke, Alice Eardley, Jonathan Gibson, Crawford Gribben, Erica Longfellow, David Norbrook, Elizabeth Scott-Baumann, and Blair Worden.

Registration: http://www.cems-oxford.org/conferences/lucy-hutchinson.

 Inquiries: hutchinson.conference@ell.ox.ac.uk

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 28. CFP. A Changing Book Market? Spain and Portugal, 1601-1650. Centre for the History of the Media, University College Dublin, 5-6 June 2014.

The marketplace for print in Spain, Portugal and the New World witnessed many pro-found transformations in the first half of the seventeenth century. Overall, there was a dramatic increase in the output of the presses, while patterns of production shifted sig-nificantly from what had been set in the preceding century. The period witnessed the growth of an increasingly vibrant news culture. Appetites for recreational reading also began to change, seen not least in the number of printed plays available for purchase. Though attracting far less scholarly attention, perhaps the most noteworthy develop-ment of all was the maturing use of the press to service government and the legal pro-fession. This conference will focus broadly on the industry and culture of print, and ask just how the Iberian book world of the first half of the seventeenth century com-pares with what had gone before and what would follow.

The conference will take place in Dublin on the 5-6 June 2014. It will coincide with the launch of volumes 2 and 3 of the UCD Iberian Book Project which cover this peri-od. Confirmed speakers include two of the most distinguished figures in Golden Age Studies, Professor Don Cruickshank and Professor Henry Ettinghausen.

Papers are warmly invited from scholars from any academic background interested in the industry or culture of the Iberian book. The principal and preferred language of the conference will be English. However, papers may be delivered in Spanish or Portu-guese if pre-circulated. Papers on less well explored areas of study such as legal print or illustration are especially welcome.

The Call for Papers is now open. Potential contributors are asked to submit a title and brief outline of their paper (250 words) to Dr Alejandra Ulla Lorenzo (alejandra.ullalorenzo@ucd.ie) before Friday 29 November 2013.

The Conference has been made possible thanks to the generous support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

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29. Medieval Merchants and Money. A conference at the Institute of Historical Research, London, on 7-8 November 2013 to celebrate the contribution of Professor James L. Bolton to the study of medieval history.

For more than forty years Jim Bolton has been based at Queen Mary, University of London, where is currently Professorial Research Fellow, directing the Borromei Bank Research Project. His published work includes important and influential contributions to the economic and social history of the middle ages, and in particular to our understanding of the money supply and the operation of credit, international banking, the impact of the Black Death, the activities of Italians and other alien groups in London, and relations between the city of London and the Crown. He was for many years one of the convenors of the IHR’s Late Medieval Seminar.

The conference will present current research from more than twenty scholars working on a range of themes connected with Jim’s work, including keynote lectures by Professor Caroline Barron (RHUL) and Professor Phillipp Schofield (Aberwystwyth).

The full programme (attached) and booking details are available at http://events.history.ac.uk/event/show/11159. ‘Early bird’ booking rates are available until 30 September. We would be very grateful if you could pass this on to colleagues and students who may be interested in attending. 

Martin Allen (Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge)

Matthew Davies (Centre for Metropolitan History, Institute of Historical

Research)

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30. The Blood Conference: Theories of Blood in Late Medieval and Early Modern English Literature and Culture. St Anne’s College, Oxford: 8th –10th, January, 2014

Convenors: Laurie Maguire, Bonnie Lander Johnson, Eleanor Decamp

Blood in the medieval and early modern periods was much more than simply red fluid in human veins. Defined diversely by theologians, medics, satirists and dramatists, it was matter, text, waste, cure, soul, God, and the means by which relationships were defined, sacramentalised and destroyed. Blood was also a controversial ingredient in the production of matter, from organic and medical to mechanical and alchemical.

Between the fourteenth and seventeenth centuries debates about the nature and function of blood raised questions about the limits of identity, God’s will for his creatures, science’s encounter with the self, and the structure of families and communities, and its impact was felt in artistic constructions on stage, in print, and on canvas.This two and a half day conference will gather early modern and medieval scholars from English, History, Art History and Medical History, to  ask: ‘What is Renaissance blood?’

Plenary addresses by

Frances Dolan (UC Davis), Patricia Parker (Stanford), Helen Barr (Oxford) and Elisabeth Dutton (Fribourg).

Discussions will cover a range of topics including blood and satire, blood and revenge, blood and gender, blood and genre, queer blood, royal blood, blood and wounding, William Harvey, blood and race, blood on the stage, blood and witchcraft, blood and alchemy, bloodlines, blood and sacrifice, blood and friendship, blood and disease, blood and automata.

The Blood Conference will feature a professional production of The Croxton Play of the Sacrament directed by Elisabeth Dutton, and a session led by David Fuller, with the help of Oxford singers, on early sacramental music and Eucharistic blood. Wellcome Trust archivists will also be offering a session on blood material in their collection. More speakers are now warmly invited. We are particularly interested in interdisciplinary papers, and those with an emphasis on Art History and Medical History. But any innovative approaches to historical blood are most welcome!

Please send a 500 word abstract to Micah Coston at thebloodconference@gmail.com bySeptember 9th 2013.

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31. CFP: Religions of the Book (Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing, Antwerp 2014)

Apologies for any cross-posting. The theme for next year’s conference on authorship, reading, and publishing is ‘religions of the book’, and they invite proposals on a wide variety of uses of books in religious contexts: 

conference website: http://www.sharp2014.be/index.html

 *Conference theme: Religions of the Book*

Next to books, literature and print heritage, religious diversity is an important part of Antwerp’s identity. From the middle of the sixteenth century onwards the city was the scene of ferocious battles between Calvinism and Catholicism in the 16th and 17th century. Jews and Muslims have also been an integral part of Antwerp’s past and both communities are visibly present in the city today. To illustrate the shared heritage of the three ‘religions of the Book’ that left their mark on the city, Antwerp will host a prestigious double exhibition from September 2014 to January 2015. One part will run in the Museum aan de Stroom (MAS) orbiting around ‘Sacred Places and Pilgrimage’, the other will take place in the Hendrik Conscience Library and will focus on ‘Sacred Books’.

Although SHARP 2014 will kick off this major double exhibition and alludes explicitly to the three ‘religions of the Book’ – Judaism, Christianity and Islam – the actual scope of the conference is much broader and may include the relationship between any religion(s) and the production, distribution and consumption of books and texts, in whatever form (manuscript, printed or digital), in any region or any period of time.  Religious and anti-religious censorship, iconography, spiritual literature, preaching practices are only a few of the many possible approaches. Moreover, participants to SHARP’s 22nd annual conference are invited to explore the more metaphorical dimensions of its central topic. We warmly invite proposals relating the theme to bibliophilia (a religion devoted to the book?), cult books, the role of authors as high priests, reading as a trance-provoking practice, the sacral status of the printed book in Enlightenment ideology, the strong belief in the freedom of the press…

One may even consider the cultural apocalypse some pessimists see ensue the on-going process of digitization, or, inversely, the imminent salvation promised by internet and tablet gurus. Cutting-edge proposals, dealing with other aspects of book history and print culture are also welcome, but priority will be given to papers addressing the conference theme.

Deadline and further requirements

Papers presented at SHARP conferences are expected to offer original scholarship and to go beyond descriptive accounts of archival or textual materials. Speakers should outline the wider implications of research presented. Both the thesis being tested and the conclusions drawn should be clearly stated in the proposal. SHARP prides itself on attracting members from a variety of disciplines, who communicate in a language accessible to diverse specialists. Proposals are to indicate how the paper (or panel) sheds light on some issue, principle, or practice of book history that clearly addresses SHARP’s interests. The conference is open to both individual presentations and complete panel proposals (with three speakers and a chairperson). Each speaker is allotted 20 minutes for the presentation and 10 minutes for discussion. All sessions last 90 minutes.

Paper proposals should be no more than 400 words, are submitted in English and accompanied by a brief biography. Panel proposals consist of three individual 400-word proposals, the required biographies and an introduction. The deadline for submissions (both individual proposals and

sessions) is 30 November 2013. The program committee will send notifications of its selection no later than 15 February 2014. All participants, including chairs and speakers, must be members of SHARP in order to participate. Registration for the conference is a prerequisite.

For information on membership, please visit the SHARP website at www.sharpweb.org.

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32. The Queen Elizabeth I Society is proud to announce the keynote speakers for our 2014 annual meeting (to be held in conjunction with the South Central Renaissance Conference, April 3-5).

Retha Warnicke is Professor of History at Arizona State University and author of several works, including Wicked Women of Tudor England: Queens, Aristocrats, Commoners (2012).  Her presentation is titled “Tudor Consorts:  The Politics of Royal Matchmaking, 1483-1543″

Jane Donawerth is Professor of English at the University of Maryland whose published works include Conversational Rhetoric: The Rise and Fall of a Women’s Tradition, 1600-1900 (2011).  The title of her presentation is “Elizabeth I and the Marriage Crisis, John Lyly’s Campaspe, and the Shaping of Court Drama”

Please see the SCRC website for further information on conference registration and paper proposals:http://www.scrc.us.com/cfp_scrc2014.shtml

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33. Fifth Early Modern Symposium: Work in Progress: Bringing Art into Being in the Early Modern Periodwhich will be held at The Courtauld Institute of Art on Saturday 26 October.

Further information and programme here: http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/researchforum/events/2013/autumn/oct26_FifthEarlyModernSymposium.shtml

Ticket/entry details:
£16 (£11 students, Courtauld staff/students and concessions). Book online here: http://courtauld-institute.digitalmuseum.co.uk

With very best wishes,

Research Forum

The Courtauld Institute of Art

Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN

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34. Call for Papers: Christopher Marlowe at 450: An Anniversary Special Issue Early Modern Literary Studies (EMLS)

2014 will be a significant year of early modern literary anniversaries. The 450th anniversary of Shakespeare’s birth is certain to attract a significant degree of popular and scholarly attention, but his is not the only milestone of note; 2014 will also mark the 450th anniversary of the birth of Shakespeare’s exact contemporary, Christopher Marlowe. In order to recognise this occasion, we invite contributions to a special anniversary issue on Marlowe, which will be published in 2014. We welcome contributions on any aspect of Marlowe studies, but topics to be addressed might include:

  • Theoretical approaches to Marlowe based upon recent developments in areas such as gender, race, geography, sexuality, etc.
  • The place of Marlowe biography
  • Marlowe and editing/textual criticism
  • Marlovian afterlives
  • Marlowe in performance
  • Marlovian genres
  • Marlowe’s influence
  • Marlowe and early modern repertory
  • Marlovian poetics

Abstracts should be submitted to Dr Dan Cadman (d.cadman@shu.ac.uk) or Dr Andrew Duxfield (a.duxfield@shu.ac.uk) by 1 November 2013. We anticipate a deadline of July 2014 for full submissions.

Early Modern Literary Studies (ISSN 1201-2459) is an open-access refereed journal serving as a formal arena for scholarly discussion and as an academic resource for researchers in the area. Articles in EMLS examine English literature, literary culture, and language during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries; responses to published papers are also published as part of a Readers’ Forum. Reviews evaluate recent work as well as academic tools of interest to scholars in the field. EMLS is committed to gathering and to maintaining links to the most useful and comprehensive internet resources for Renaissance scholars, including archives, electronic texts, discussion groups, and beyond. For further details see: http://extra.shu.ac.uk/emls/emlshome.html

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35. The British Institute of Florence Shakespeare and His Contemporaries, 6th Annual Postgraduate Conference 10th April 2014.

 The British Institute of Florence’s annual Shakespeare Graduate Conference is a one-day interdisciplinary and bilingual English-Italian forum open to PhD students and researchers who have obtained their doctorates within the past 5 years. This year’s conference theme is Shakespeare and His Contemporaries: Forms of Nationhood. Contributions are welcomed on the topic of national identity and representations of Elizabethan England in the literary production of William Shakespeare and his contemporaries (playwrights, poets and others) across different disciplines (not limited to):

literature, comparative studies, history, art history, cinema and theatre history.

Candidates are invited to send a description of their proposed contribution according to the following guidelines:

•       the candidate should provide name, institution, contact info, title and a short abstract of the proposed contribution (200-300 words for a 20-minute paper), explaining the content and intended structure of the paper, and including a short bibliography.

•       abstracts are to be submitted by Wednesday 30 October 2013 by email tosnovello@britishinstitute.it.

•       all proposals will be blind-vetted. The list of selected papers will be available by the end of November 2013.

•       each finished contribution is to last no longer than 20 minutes andis to be presented in English (an exception will be made for Italian candidates of departments other than English, who can present papers in Italian). Candidates whose first language is not English will need to have their proposals and final papers checked by a mother-tongue speaker.

•       participants will be asked to present a final draft of the paper aweek before the Conference.

•       participants must be members of the Harold Acton Library, choosingbetween a 3, 6 or 12 month membership. Memberships can be paid for on the day of conference. For details on Library Membership rates and benefits please visit the websitewww.britishinstitute.it.

•       The British Institute cannot reimburse any travel or accommodation expenses.

•       papers submitted will be considered for publication in the onlineproceedings edition of the ‘Shakespeare and His Contemporaries Graduate Conference (see the websitewww.britishinstitute.it  for previous volumes of the proceedings).

Deadline for abstracts Wednesday 30 October 2013 For more information contact Sofia Novello atsnovello@britishinstitute.it

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36. Forthcoming lecture series on Shakespeare and the Classical Tradition by Professor Jonathan Bate FBA CBE, Provost of Worcester College, Oxford,  to be held at the Warburg Institute.

Full details are given below and a poster can be printed off at: http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/fileadmin/images/events/Lectures/Gombrich_lectures.pdf We would be grateful if you could forward this email to any of your contacts who may be interested. We would also appreciate it if you could display the poster on your department notice board. 

Princeton University Press and The Warburg Institute, School of Advanced Study, University of London
E. H. GOMBRICH LECTURES ON THE CLASSICAL TRADITION 2013

ANCIENT STRENGTH
Professor Jonathan Bate FBA CBE, Provost of Worcester College, Oxford

The E. H. Gombrich Lectures is an annual series of Lectures on Aspects of the Classical Tradition, named in honour of Professor Sir Ernst Gombrich FBA OM, former Director of the Warburg Institute and Professor of the History of the Classical Tradition, University of London. The Lectures will be held at the Warburg Institute and will be published by Princeton University Press.

The inaugural series of lectures on Shakespeare and the Classical Tradition will be given by Professor Jonathan Bate, FBA CBE, Editor of Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus, co-editor of The Complete Works, The RSC Shakespeare, author of Shakespeare and OvidThe Genius of ShakespeareSoul of the Age (and many other books) and co-organiser of the 2012 British Museum Exhibition, Shakespeare: Staging the World.

Thursday 10 October 2013, 5pm – Tragical Comical Historical Pastoral: Shakespeare and Classical Genre

Thursday 17 October 2013, 5pm – The Madness of Hercules: Shakespeare and Classical Psychology

Thursday 24 October 2013, 5pm – ‘I will read politic authors’: Shakespeare and Classical Political Thought

Each Lecture will be followed by a Reception.

Attendance is free of charge and pre-registration is not required.

****************************************************************

Newsletter 40

By Alexander Samson, on 18 June 2013

  1. CFP: Time and Space in Early Modern Literature, Queen’s Belfast, 17th and 18th January, 2014, abstracts due 31st July.
  2. CFP: Bringing Art into Being in the Early Modern Period Fifth Early Modern Symposium, Saturday 26 October 2013, The Courtauld Institute of Art, abstracts due 21 June 2013.
  3. Renaissance and Reformation / Renaissance et Réforme is soliciting article proposals for a celebratory special issue on Renaissance and Reformation studies in Canada to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the journal.
  4. Bess of Hardwick Online
  5. Conference Programme: Early Modern Paratexts 2013, University of Bristol,  Clifton Hill House, Friday 26th July
  6. CFP: Society for Renaissance Studies 6th Biennial Conference, Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Culture,University of Southampton,13-15 July 2014, abstracts due 27th September.
  7. Shakespeare and Creativity MA at Shakespeare Institute Birmingham.
  8. CFP: THE INTERNATIONAL VOICE IN SHAKESPEARE, The Rose Theatre, Bankside. 56 Park London, SE1 9AS, September 30 2013,18:00-21:00, abstracts due 31st July.
  9. Shakespeare Jahrbuch 2015 – call for articles, deadline, 31 March 2014.
  10. CFP: FRAMING PREMODERN DESIRES. Between Sexuality, Sin and Crime. An international colloquium organized by Turku Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, 4-5 April 2014, Turku, Finland, abstracts due 30th June.
  11. Popes and the Papacy in early modern English culture. An interdisciplinary conference at the University of Sussex, 24th-26th June 2013.
  12. Stuart Successions: An Interdisciplinary Colloquium to be held at Jesus College, Oxford, 27-28 September 2013.
  13. Conference: News and the Shape of Europe, 1500-1750, Queen Mary, University of London, 26-28th July.
  14. CFP: Katherine Philips 350: Writing, Reputation, Legacy,27-28 June, 2014, Dublin, abstracts due 31st August.
  15. CFP: Sixth Biennial British Shakespeare Association Conference, Shakespeare: Text, Power, Authority http ://shakespeare . stir . ac . uk/ University of Stirling, 3-6 July 2014, abstracts due 31st January.
  16. Fifth Early Modern Symposium, Work in Progress: Bringing Art into Being in the Early Modern Period, will take place at The Courtauld on Saturday 26 October 2013, abstracts due 21st June.
  17. Conference: Sensing the Sacred: Religion and the Senses, 1300 – 1800, Interdisciplinary conference, University of York, 21-22 June 2013.
  18. Research Assistant in Art History (fixed term, 10 months), Warburg Institute, The Production and Reading of Polyphonic Music Sources, 1480–1530 (PRoMS), deadline 30th June. 
  19. CFP: New College Conference on Medieval and Renaissance Studies will take place 6–9 March 2014 in Sarasota, Florida, abstracts due 15th September.
  20. IHR POSTGRADUATE RESEARCH TRAINING COURSES, Summer 2013
  21. ‘Exiturus: In Between Times and Spaces on the Early Modern Stage’, London Renaissance Seminar, Saturday 29th June 2013, 13.00-16.00, The Keynes Library, School of Arts, Birkbeck, University of London.
  22. Conference: Sculptural Mobilities: Tracing the flows of sculptural artworks between the Nordic Countries and Europe from the early modern period to the present day, UCL, 2nd and 3rd July 2013, Film screening – One-day Symposium – Exhibition.
  23. Symposium: Northern Renaissance Seminar, Writing the Renaissance North, Saturday 22nd June 2013, 10:00am-4:30pm, Sheffield Hallam University, Room 921, Owen Building, City Campus.
  24. Lady Jane Lumley, Iphigenia at Aulis (c. 1555) performed  by The Rose Company, directed by Emma Rucastle, 8.30 pm, Tuesday 9 July, 2013
    Minghella Theatre, University of Reading.
  25. CFP: REVISITING EARLY MODERN PROPHECIES (c.1500-c.1815), 26–28 June, 2014, Goldsmiths, London, abstracts due 31st October.
  26. Conference: Fourth International Conference on Religion and Spirituality in Society, 29-30 April 2014, Universidad Nacional Costa Rica, Heredia, Costa Rica.
  27. CFP: Ways of Knowing: Graduate Conference on Religion at Harvard Divinity School, Oct 25-6, 2013 in Cambridge, Massachusetts, abstrats due July 1, 2013.
  28.  Renaissance Art and Music seminar: Counterfeit Renaissance (II): Experiencing Art with Music – which will take place Thursday 27 June (18.00) in the Research Forum South Room (The Courtauld Institute of Art).

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1.

Call for Papers:Time and Space in Early Modern Literature and Culture, 1500-1700

School of English, Queen’s University, Belfast, 17th & 18th January, 2014

The School of English at Queen’s University warmly invites early modern academics and PhD graduates of all levels to submit abstracts, of no more than 200 words, and which engage with the theme of ‘Time and Space in Early Modern Literature and Culture’, for a two-day conference on the 17th and 18th of January, 2014.  Plenary speakers include Professor Lena Cowen Orlin of Georgetown University, Professor Daniel Carey of the National University of Ireland, and Dr Karen Smyth of the University of East Anglia.

The relations between time and space as modes of critical inquiry have attracted increased attention in early modern studies in recent years. In a society accustomed to allegory and symbol, the spatial and the temporal were continually and deliberately re-imagined and ‘re-presented’ across a spectrum of performative, artistic, and textual medias. Central to the burgeoning self-consciousness which characterised such productions, time and space were essential instruments with which actors, artists, and writers navigated and engaged with the complexities of a rapidly expanding world: advancements in architecture, the evolution of a temporal economy, and the discovery of new worlds are but a few examples of events and cultural movements in which space and time played integral roles. Time and Space in Early Modern Literature and Culture, 1500-1700 promotes a new reading of the importance of time and space within a range of disciplines in early modern criticism, and seeks to establish a forum in which the cultural, political, and religious implications of shifting paradigms can be explored. Potential topics which speakers are encouraged, but by no means limited, to address are:

  • Constructions of time in early modern spaces (mercantile, ecclesiastical, theatrical, literary, etc.)
  • The commodification of time
  • Negotiating time in public and private spaces
  • Shifting ideologies of space and time
  • Moving towards modernity: early modern and modern conceptions of time and space
  • Gendered time and gendered spaces
  • Memory, time and space
  • Time and power
  • ‘Space’ versus ‘place’
  • Time and space in Renaissance art
  • Staging time
  • The relationship between space and text
  • ‘Foreign’ time and ‘foreign’ spaces
  • Negotiating time and space on film
  • ‘Re-presenting’ space and time
  • Constructing history through temporal and spatial paradigms

The deadline for submission of abstracts (200 words maximum for 20 minute presentations) is 31st July, 2013. Submissions for panels are also invited. A small conference fee of £30 is requested, which covers lunch and refreshments for both days. Some funding for PG bursaries will be available.

Please email submissions to: timeandspace@qub.ac.uk

Please direct all queries to:

Denise Kelly at dkelly49@qub.ac.uk

Paul Mulgrew at pmulgrew01@qub.ac.uk

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2.

Work in Progress: Bringing Art into Being in the Early Modern Period

Fifth Early Modern Symposium

Call for Papers
21 June 2013

Symposium to take place Saturday 26 October 2013
The Courtauld Institute of Art, London
For more information: http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/researchforum/events/2013/autumn/oct26_FifthEarlyModernSymposium.shtml

We invite 20-minute papers considering artistic ‘work in progress’ in the early modern period (c.1550-1800):

  • what processes of translation and transposition were involved in moving art out of the realm of ideas into the material world? Papers might analyse and discuss the evolution of an artwork from concept to creation or construction and consider each phase of development in turn. This could involve close examination of plans, drawings, studies, sketches, maquettes or bozzetti for the same artistic project and consideration of how each stage shaped the end product
  • what did contemporary ideas, religious beliefs, and philosophical theories (those of Spinoza, for example) have to say about creativity – and how might these have informed the conception of the early modern work of art? As Peter Conrad (Creation: Artists, Gods & Origins, 2007) has suggested, ‘any investigation of art has to ponder the notion of God’s creation’. Vasari paid homage to the ‘ultimate initiator’ in his Lives of the Most Eminent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects and described Genesis as the adventures of a ‘creative intellect’
  • how might the early modern preoccupation with the idea of progress have been relevant to the creation of art?
  • was creativity gendered in the period? Did the early modern version of sexual reproduction – in which women simply encased the precious, implicitly masculine kernel of creativity – affect contemporaries’ understanding of the way art was generated?
  • can current theories and methodologies illuminate the process of art-making in the period? What can material data and scientific research methods, such as infra-red reflectography, dendro-chronology and chemical analysis of pigments, tell us?
  • what happened when artistic aspiration collided with social and political realities or encountered financial and practical constraints? Papers might describe artistic indecision and frustration and examine the choices and creative opportunities that resulted. How did projects come to be altered or radically revised in scale and ambition? What were the implications of rejection in such cases as Caravaggio’s ‘St Matthew and the Angel’ for the Contarelli chapel in San Luigi dei Francesi?
  • drawing on Victor Stoichita’s study of ‘meta-painting’, papers could explore how early modern artworks reflected on their own bringing into being and making. Vermeer’s ‘The Painter in his Studio’ (c.1666), ‘Las Meninas’ by Velázquez (1656-7), and Panini’s ‘Modern Rome’ and its pendant ‘Ancient Rome’ (1757) are examples of the many artworks from the period that take the process of artistic creation as their subject.

We invite proposals from graduate students, junior scholars, curators, and conservators for papers that explore one or more of the above-mentioned issues in any artistic medium (painting, sculpture, architecture, decorative arts, print media, graphic arts and the intersections between them). Theoretical and technical approaches are equally welcome.

We do not at present have a budget for travel and accommodation for speakers. Students from outside London are encouraged to apply to their institutions for funding to participate in the symposium.

Please send proposals of no more than 300 words along with a 150 word biography by 21 June 2013 to anya.matthews@courtauld.ac.uk and giulia.weston@courtauld.ac.uk

Organised by Anya Matthews and Giulia Martina Weston (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

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3.

Renaissance and Reformation / Renaissance et Réforme is soliciting article proposals for a celebratory special issue on Renaissance and Reformation studies in Canada to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the journal in 2014 (call/appel attached), and we are counting on you to help us promote and disseminate this call among your colleagues and advanced graduate students.

This issue seeks first to reflect on and contribute to Renaissance and Reformation studies as practiced in Canada since the journal’s inception as an informational bulletin in 1964 to the present day, and second to critically assess and provide new direction for early modern studies as a major interdisciplinary field of study in the humanities in Canada and abroad, now and in the coming decades.  We seek contributions in three principal areas: research, pedagogy, and established organizations (see details in the attachment), but the editorial committee will also give full consideration to relevant proposals outside of these categories.

Scholars with a long history of participation in the journal and in Renaissance and Reformation studies in Canada are invited to propose brief comments on the history of the field in terms of research, pedagogy, and organizational support.  Other scholars – in particular junior scholars including advanced graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, and pre-tenure faculty – are invited to propose brief comments on the future direction of the field within Canada and abroad.

We ask that you forward the attached call (abstracts due 1 July 2013) to anyone you think may be interested in contributing; if you yourself are interested in making a contribution, we would be very pleased to consider your proposal.

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4.

Bess of Hardwick’s Letters: The Complete Correspondence, c.1550-1608, ed. by Alison Wiggins, Alan Bryson, Daniel Starza Smith, Anke Timmermann and Graham Williams, University of Glasgow, web development by Katherine Rogers, University of Sheffield Humanities Research Institute (April 2013), [date of access],http://www.bessofhardwick.org 

 For news about Bess of Hardwick’s Letters: twitter.com/alisonwiggins

Bess of Hardwick’s Letters brings together, for the first time, the remarkable letters written to and from Bess of Hardwick Bess of Hardwick (c.1521/2-1608) is one of Elizabethan England’s most famous figures. She is renowned for her reputation as a dynast and indomitable matriarch and perhaps best known as the builder of great stately homes like the magnificent Hardwick Hall and Chatsworth House. The story of her life told to date typically emphasises her modest birth, her rise through the ranks of society, her four husbands, each of greater wealth than the last, and her ambitious aggrandisement of her family.

Bess’s letters bring to life her extraordinary story and allow us to eavesdrop on her world. The letters allow us to reposition Bess as a complex woman of her times, immersed in the literacy and textual practices of everyday life as she weaves a web of correspondence that stretches from servants, friends and family, to queens and officers of state.

You will find on this site:

*              234 letters to and from Bess available as transcripts (diplomatic, normalised, print-friendly or xml)

*              Colour images of 185 letters and the option to create your own transcripts

*              Search and browse facilities to filter the letters by material or visual features or by events in Bess’s life

*              Commentaries that provide overviews of Bess’s life in 12 letters and editing her letters, and guides to the material features and the language of early modern letters

 Dr Alison Wiggins

Senior Lecturer in English Language

School of Critical Studies

12 University Gardens

Glasgow G12 8QQ

0141 330 3918

alison.wiggins@glasgow.ac.uk

PI AHRC Bess of Hardwick’s Letters Project www.bessofhardwick.org 

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5.

You are warmly invited to attend Early Modern Paratexts 2013, a conference at the University of Bristol on Friday 26th July.  As well as presentations on Shakespeare, Spenser, Caxton, and Ovid, there will be papers on subjects as diverse as early modern music manuals, gynaecological texts and playing cards, a Japanese early modern bestseller and a Croatian-Italian conspiracy theory.  

 The full programme details are below (and also attached), along with the poster.

 Registration is now open, at a cost of £35, and can be carried out via our website: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/arts/research/events/2013/1489.html.  Thanks to the support of the Department of English, the Society for Renaissance Studies and the Bristol Institute for Research in the Humanities and Arts we do have bursaries available for postgraduates.  If you are a postgraduate and would like to receive a bursary, please could you email earlymodernparatexts2013@gmail.com attaching a letter of support from your supervisor confirming your status.  Bursaries are limited, however, so we would request that you only apply for one if you plan to definitely attend the conference.   

In the meantime, you can follow us on facebook or on twitter: @EMParatexts2013

We look forward to seeing you in July.

 With apologies for cross-posting and a request to circulate widely.

 Early Modern Paratexts 2013

University of Bristol        Clifton Hill House    

Friday 26th July

9.00-9.30          Registration and Coffee

9.30-9.40          Seating and Welcome

9.40-11.00         Panel 1, Wills Reception Room                

People of the Paratext

Danielle Clarke, University College Dublin

‘Early Modern Women’s Poetry, Form and Paratext’

Colm MacCrossan, Early English Books Online Text Creation Partnership, Oxford ‘Performing Patronage in the Headers of Richard Hakluyt’s The Principal Navigations (1598-1600)’

Tamara Atkin, Queen Mary, and Emma Smith, Hertford College Oxford

‘Actors, Speakers and Personated Persons: Character Lists as Paratexts in Early Modern Plays’

11.00-11.30               Coffee

11.30-12.50               Panel 2, Wills Reception Room                

Prefacing the Text             

Ben Crabstick, Independent Scholar

‘ “I shall deserve of the age”: Humphrey Moseley and the Publisher’s Preface’

Harriet Archer, Christ Church College Oxford

‘Rewriting History: The Unstable Texts and Paratexts of John Higgins’s Mirror for Magistrates (1574-1587)’

Harry Newman, Kent

‘ “[M]y intentions herein are honest and iust”: Prefacing Printed Gynaecological and Obstetrical Texts in Early Modern England’

Panel 3, Symonds Music Room            

 ‘And another thing …’

 Tom Charlton, Stirling

‘ “Place these three Letters as marked’: the Reliquiæ Baxterianæ, Interpolation and Paratext’

 Marion Löffler, Centre for Advanced Welsh and Celtic Studies

‘Translation, Education and Politics: Paratexts in 1790s Wales’   

M artina Pranić, Free University Berlin

‘The Meaning in the Paratext: Changing Perspectives on  Marin Držić’s Conspiratorial Episode’

12.50-2.00         Lunch

2.00-3.20          Panel 4, Wills Reception Room     

The Paratext Proper

Camilla Temple, Bristol

‘The Emblem Book Epic and its Trans-European Readership: a Sixteenth-century Edition of Ovid’s Metamorphoses

Sophie Butler, New College Oxford

‘ “I Present thee Reader with no excellencies”: Paratextual Readers and Writers of Essays in Early Modern England’

Katherine Hunt, Birkbeck

‘Shuffled Knowledge: Text and Paratext in Early Modern Didactic Playing Cards’

                             Panel 5, Symonds Music Room    

Disrupting Reading

Bláithín Hurley, St John’s College Cambridge

‘Paratextual Paradigms or Decorative Distractions: Illustrations in the Music Instrument Manuals of Sylvestro di Ganassi’

Lynsey McCulloch, Coventry, and Rob Tovey, Worcester

‘Designing the Early Modern Frontispiece: “All this literature is book-nurtured and book-bound” ’

Rachel Stenner, Bristol

‘Books and Things: William Caxton’s Erroneous Texts’

3.20-3.50          Tea

3.50-5.10          Panel 6, Wills Reception Room     

Shaping and Reshaping

Peter Kirwan, Nottingham

‘ “The doubtful title, gentlemen, prefixed”: Paratextual Truth Claims and Authenticity in the “Shakespeare Apocrypha” ’

Judith Atty, Queen Mary

‘Changing Paratext, Changing Meaning: from Les Antiquitez to Ruines of Rome

Laura Moretti, Emmanuel College Cambridge

‘Ensuring Popularity: the Clever Use of Paratext in the Multiple Editions of a Japanese Early Modern Bestseller’

                             Panel 7, Symonds Music Room    

Reading Materials

Peter Auger, Oxford

‘Printed Marginalia as Punctuation’

Lucy Razzall, Emmanuel College Cambridge

‘Printed Repositories in Early Modern England’

Rebecca Bullard, Reading

‘Signs of the times?  Reading Signatures in Two Late Seventeenth-century Secret Histories’

5.10-5.20          Comfort Break

5.20-6.10          Plenary Address, Wills Reception Room

Helen Smith, York

‘Negotiating Paratexts’

6.10-6.30          Closing Discussion, Wills Reception Room

6.30-8.00          Drinks Reception

 Early Modern Paratexts 2013 Conference Website

earlymodernparatexts2013@gmail.com

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6.

Society for Renaissance Studies 6th Biennial Conference

Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Culture

University of Southampton

13-15 July 2014

Call for Papers

 The conference theme is ‘Performative Spaces’.  We invite Renaissance scholars from the disciplines of archaeology, architecture, history of art, history, history of science and medicine, literature, music, philosophy  and other fields to submit proposals for panels (90 mins), and individual papers (20 mins), that engage with ‘Performative Spaces’:

  • as liturgical or religious performances;
  • by addressing the ways objects were intended to tell stories;
  • as processions, rituals, and ceremonies;
  • as houses, and through building design;
  • by exploring diplomatic and political spaces;
  • as actual and textual musical and dramatic performances;
  • through artistic representation;
  • as anatomies or scientific experiments;
  • through clothing or furniture;
  • as seascapes/ landscapes;
  • through the use of new technologies such as podcasts, blogs, twitter;
  • by addressing public engagement and pedagogy.

In addition there is an ‘Open Strand’ which welcomes proposals for panels or papers on any aspect of Renaissance studies.

Plenary lectures will be given by Lena Cowen Orlin (Georgetown), Sharon Strocchia (Emory), Simon Thurley (English Heritage), and there will be workshops on publishing and research funding and tours of historic buildings around the city.

Proposals (max. 400 words) are welcome from both established scholars and postgraduates and they should be sent by Friday 27 September 2013 to the conference organizers:

Professor Ros King (r.king@southampton.ac.uk) Director, CMRC

Professor Claire Jowitt (c.jowitt@southampton.ac.uk) Conference Convenor, SRS

 Further details (e.g. full programme, registration forms and information about accommodation) will be posted as they become available.  Please note that the Society is particularly keen to encourage postgraduates to offer papers, and we will be able to offer generous bursaries to cover travel, registration and accommodation expenses.  Also note that the SRS has come to an agreement with the Renaissance Society of America: RSA members will not have to join the SRS to participate in this conference.

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8.

CALL FOR PAPERS

THE INTERNATIONAL VOICE IN SHAKESPEARE

The Rose Theatre, Bankside. 56 Park London, SE1 9AS

September 30 2013

18:00-21:00

In order to raise money for the final excavation of the first Elizabethan Theatre: The Rose Theatre, Bankside, http://www.rosetheatre.org.uk/, this evening conference, The International Voice in Shakespeare, on Monday 30 September 2013, will combine academic papers with performances of Shakespeare plays, including:

Samiel Daniel’s Tragedie of Cleopatra, produced by Yasmin Arshad and directed by Emma Whipday [tbc] http://thetragedieofcleopatra.wordpress.com/

and an extract from the physical adaptation of Macbeth, produced by WOH Productions, http://www.wohproductions.com/new-writing/macbeth/, which will be staged in full at the Rose on  3rd – 28th July 2013.

This occasion is the first time in which a conference featuring performances will be held at the Rose Theatre, where specialists from different departments at UCL will come together to discuss their research on Shakespeare, chaired by  Prof Rene Weis (English Department) and Dr Florian Mussgnug (Italian Department, SELCS).

Scholars and researchers from a variety of disciplines (e.g. modern languages, literature studies, theatre studies, film studies, linguistics, history, art, etc.) are invited to contribute papers of 20 minutes in English discussing the different ways in which Shakespeare has been translated, transported and transposed around the globe.

Please send your 200-300 word proposals and a brief biography (including present status and any institutional affiliation) by July 31 2013 via email to: 

Enza De Francisci: e.francisci@ucl.ac.uk

 Dr Enza De Francisci

Teaching Assistant

Department of Italian

School of European Languages, Culture and Society

University College London

Gower Street

WC1E 6BT

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9.

Shakespeare Jahrbuch 2015 – Call for Papers

In 2014 German Shakespeareans will celebrate not only Shakespeare’s 450th birthday but also the 150th birthday of the German Shakespeare Society. For this reason, the next Shakespeare Jahrbuch will be a special issue devoted to CELBRATING SHAKESPEARE.

The editorial board invites essays on the following issues:

  • Shakespeare jubilees, celebrations and anniversaries
  • Shakespeare monuments
  • bardolatry
  • Shakespeare theatre festivals
  • Shakespeare celebrations and the construction of national / cultural identities
  • the history of Shakespeare celebrations (in different countries)
  • Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s “Zum Shakespeares-Tag” (1771)
  • the Shakespeare tercentenaries in 1864 and 1916
  • celebrations and festivities in Shakespeare‘s plays and on the early modern stage

Papers to be published in Shakespeare Jahrbuch should be formatted according to the style sheet of the Jahrbuch, which can be downloaded from the website of the Shakespeare Society (http://shakespeare-gesellschaft.de/en/jahrbuch/note-on-submission.html). The length of articles should not exceed 6,000 words.

Please email your manuscript (as a Word-file) to the editor by 31 March 2014.

Prof. Dr. Sabine Schülting

Freie Universität Berlin
Institut für Englische Philologie
Habelschwerdter Allee 45
D-14195 Berlin

email: sabine.schuelting@fu-berlin.de

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10.

FRAMING PREMODERN DESIRES. Between Sexuality, Sin and Crime

CFP: An international colloquium organized by Turku Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies,

4-5 April 2014, Turku, Finland

Sexuality is inevitably closely linked with wellbeing, individual identity and the very beginning of life. In premodern cultures sexual desires were perceived, described and encountered in a variety of ways. The praise concerning procreation, as well as sexual acts within the frames of marital institutions and between the ones in love was very much present in the surviving sources. At the same time, sexual desires belonged to the most regulated areas of human behavior bridled by religious and legal authorities.

Recently, the scholarly field of the history of sexuality has laid a special emphasis on the multiple varieties in understanding past sexual desires in a particular time and place. We will focus on exploring the localities and temporalities of sexuality, the visibility and invisibility of sexual desires, as well as the intersections of sexuality and moral offences in late medieval and early modern societies (13th–18th centuries).

The colloquium seeks to deepen our understanding of the varieties of sexuality and sexual practices by bringing together experts in the disciplines of cultural, legal and medical history, as well as literature, languages, art, archaeology, and religion. We especially welcome multidisciplinary research approaches and studies emphasizing cross- and transcultural perspectives, as well as non-western histories of sexualities and moralities.

Confirmed Speakers:

 - Faramerz Dabhoiwala (Oxford, UK)

- Jonas Liliequist (Umeå, Sweden)

- Garthine Walker (Cardiff UK)

- Dror Zeevi (Ben-Gurion University of Negev, Israel)

 Call for Papers

The colloquium is open for scholars in all stages of academic life. Early career researchers are especially encouraged to send proposals. Papers may discuss but do not have to restrict themselves to the following themes:

- sexual practices, customs and manners

- sexual desire as sin or crime

- secular and religious policies towards immorality

- medical attitudes towards sexuality and health

- sexuality and gender in popular culture

- the materiality of sexuality and bodiliness

We look forward to receiving individual abstracts (max. 300 words) or suggestions for sessions of 3–4 papers by 30 June 2013. Proposals should be sent to

desires@utu.fi

Proposals for papers of 20 minutes will be evaluated by the organizing committee and the approval will follow in August.

The conference language is English. Selected papers and lectures will be published after the conference. Travel and accommodation costs will be covered by the participants. A small colloquium fee will cover lunches and refreshments.

Organization committee: Meri Heinonen, Eva Johanna Holmberg, Marjo Kaartinen, Satu Lidman, Tom Linkinen, Kirsi Salonen, Mari Välimäki

Turku is the oldest town in Finland. By the river Aura you can sense the medieval atmosphere and visit interesting museums, shops and restaurants. To find out more about accommodation, transportation and the university, check out the links below:

http://www.visitturku.fi/en

 http://www.utu.fi/en/Pages/home.aspx

 For more information about the conference, contact desires@utu.fi

The conference web page will be opened in May:

http://utu.fi/en/units/hum/sites/tucemems/news-and-events/colloquiums/premoderndesires/Pages/home.aspx

 On the behalf of the organization committee,

Eva Johanna Holmberg

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11.

Popes and the Papacy in early modern English culture

An interdisciplinary conference at the University of Sussex, 24th-26th June 2013

Programme

Monday 24th June:

9.30 – 11.00: Registration  

(Reception area, Fulton Building.  Tea and Coffee in Fulton 201)

11.00 – 12.15: Welcome and Plenary 1  (Lecture Theatre A)

Chair:

           Peter Lake (Vanderbilt)

12.15 – 1.15: Lunch (Fulton 201)

1.15 – 2.45: Session 1

a) England and Papal authority (Fulton 213)

Chair: Chance Woods

Jonathan Hancock (Kent), The Early Tudors and their Cardinal Protectors 1492 – 1514.

Peter Clarke (Southampton), Rivalling Rome: Cardinal Wolsey and Papal Dispensations.

Freddy C. Dominguez (Vanderbilt), Robert Parson, the (lamentable)  legacy of Trent and a plan for English Reform.

b) Anti-Christ (Fulton 214)

Chair: Cathy Parsons

Thomas S. Freeman (Essex), 1077 and all that: the account of Gregory VII in Foxe’s Book of Martyrs.

Stella Fletcher (Warwick), Alexander VI, Guicciardini and Barnabe                                Barnes.

Adrian Streete (QUB), Politics, rivalry and anti-Catholicism in Barnabe Barnes’ The Devil’s Charter (1606).

2.45 – 3.00: Tea (Fulton 201)

3.00 – 4.30: Session 2

a) Staging the Pope (Fulton 213)

Chair: Nicole Coonradt.

Peter Osolsobe (Brno), Encoding the Papacy and St. Peter in Recusant Drama.

Barbara Wooding (Birkbeck), Cardinal Sin vs. Cardinal Virtue: Staging Princes of the Church in early modern England.

Lachlan Malone (University of Southern Queensland), ‘Hellish Enfleshment’: the Anti-Christ Pope in Early Modern England.

         b) Other Popes (Fulton 214)

Chair: Tom Charlton

Matthew Dimmock (Sussex), title tbc.

Paul Quinn (Sussex), ‘He is held to be the Pope among their number’: How  ‘Gammon-Shitter’ became a ‘Trojan Horse’ in English anti-Arminian texts.

Rachel Willie (Bangor), title tbc.

4.30 – 5.30: Plenary 2 (Fulton Lecture Theatre A)

Chair:

Alison Shell (UCL): Traherne and the Papacy

Drinks Reception

***

Tuesday 25th June:

9.15 – 10.45: Session 3

a) Trinkets and Trash (Fulton 213)

Chair: Chloe Porter

Katrina Marchant (Sussex), ‘Rifraf’ and ‘Trishtrash’: Escaping Papal merchandise in Reformation England.

Devori Kimbro (Arizona State University), Coining Gods from Creatures: Paul V as ‘Coiner’ in Thomas Milles’ The Misteries of Iniquitie (1611).

Cathy Parsons (Brighton and Sussex), ‘Prescripts, deceits and all other rare impediments’: Medical imagery in anti-Catholic satire in 1630s England.

b) The Pope in later seventeenth-century England                                               (Fulton 214)

Chair: Ronald Corthell

David Magliocco (Queen Mary), Pepys and the Pope: from the exotic (and  erotic) to the quotidian, and back again.

Adam Morton (Warwick), Battling with Popes: sedition, scurrility and satire in Succession crisis visual media.

Tom Charlton (Stirling), Is the Pope Catholic? Anti-Popery in anti-Quaker  polemic in the late seventeenth century.

10.45 – 11.00: Tea (Fulton 201)

11.00 – 12.30: Session 4

          a) Recusant and anti-Recusant literature (Fulton 213)

Chair: Peter Clarke

Chance Woods (Vanderbilt), Robert Southwell’s ‘heavenly sparkes of wit’: Aestheticizing the First Pope in ‘St. Peter’s Complaint’.

Janis Darvill Mills (Brighton and Sussex), ‘A hotchpotch they, and mingle mangle make of things divine and humane’: Catholicism, conscience and    the early modern Common Law.

          Lilla Grindlay (UCL), The Papacy and the Queen of Heaven.

b) Sussex and the Pope (Fulton 214)

Chair: Andrew Foster

Andrew Hadfield (Sussex), Thomas Drant.

Maria Kirk (Sussex), title tbc.

Graham Mayhew (Independent), Reformation Lewes.

12.30 – 2.00: Travel to Lewes.

2.00 – 3.00: Plenary 3  (at the Anne of Cleves House)

Chair: Andrew Hadfield

Susannah Monta (Notre Dame), Anthony Copley and A Fig for Fortune.

3.15 onwards: Tour of Lewes.

Conference dinner (Panda Garden restaurant, Lewes)

***

Wednesday 26th June:

9.30 – 10.15: No Popery – the Lewes Bonfire celebrations.

A presentation by Dr. Jim Etherington (Fulton 114)

10.15 – 10.30: Tea (Fulton 203)

10.30 – 12.30: Session 5

a) Shakespearean Papists: Foreigners, poisoners and traitors (Fulton 114)

Chair: Adrian Streete

Barbara Kennedy (Sussex), ‘Quid dabitis?’: Dr. Lopez’s poisonous Popish treason.

Duncan Salkeld (Chichester), Much ado about London Italians.

Shanyn Altman (Sussex), title tbc.

Nicole Coonradt (Hillsdale College), ‘Thus conscience does make cowards of us all’: Hamlet and the Recusant Dilemma.

b) Religious controversy and correspondence (Fulton 101)

Chair: Devori Kimbro

Joshua Rodda (Nottingham), ‘What end can our controversies have without a judge?’: Measures of authority in post-Reformation disputes.

Jamie Blake Knox (Trinity College, Dublin), ‘The Fairest Wars’.

Abigail Shinn (York), Building Rome in the English Conversion Narrative.

Edward Chaney (Southampton Solent), title tbc.

12.30 – 1.15: Lunch (Fulton 203)

1.15 – 2.00: Round table discussion (Fulton 101) 

Chair: Paul Quinn

Featuring Susannah Monta and Michael Questier.

Conference closes.

For Info contact Paul Quinn, p.l.quinn@sussex.ac.uk

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12.

Stuart Successions

An Interdisciplinary Colloquium to be held at Jesus College, Oxford

27-28 September 2013

Moments of royal and protectoral succession in the early-modern period generated huge quantities of writing across a range of forms: from panegyric to polemic, sermon to satire, history to drama. This two-day colloquium, organised as part of the AHRC-funded ‘Stuart Successions Project’, will bring together speakers from Europe and the US to investigate how this body of succession literature reflected on unpredictable transitions of power, discussed the political values of the nation, and shaped contending perceptions of key political personalities in 17th-century Britain.

For further information and registration please visit: http://stuarts.exeter.ac.uk/events/stuart-successions/

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13.

Conference: News and the Shape of Europe, 1500-1750, Queen Mary, University of London, 26-28th July

Registration open: http://newscom.english.qmul.ac.uk/events/items/83801.html

How did news cross Europe, and how did news make Europe? News in early modern Europe was a distinctively transnational phenomenon; its topics were international in scope; the forms and terminologies of news, as well as the news itself, crossed national boundaries; practices of news-gathering relied on networks of international agents; it was widely translated; it travelled along commercial routes, or through postal networks that developed in express imitation of one another and were designed to be mutually connected; and the forces attempting to control the press operated, or attempted to operate, well outside of their actual jurisdiction. The spread of news and the appetite for it reflect changes in the geopolitical and confessional maps of Europe, spreading through ethnic and religious diasporas as well as diplomatic, mercantile and scholarly networks. It helped forge communities on a local, national and international scale. The purpose of the conference is to explore ways in which this history can be written. 

News and the Shape of Europe is the final stage of the Leverhulme international network, News Networks in Early Modern Europe, a two-year investigation of news communication laying the groundwork for a European history of news.

Dr. Elizabeth Williamson

Network Facilitator

News Networks in Early Modern Europe

 e.williamson@qmul.ac.uk

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14.

Katherine Philips 350: Writing, Reputation, Legacy

27-28 June, 2014

2014 marks the 350th anniversary of a key year in English-language women’s literary history. 1664 witnessed not only the publication of Katherine Philips’s supposedly unauthorised Poems but also her untimely death at the age of 32. ‘Katherine Philips 350: Writing, Reputation, Legacy’ – an international conference to be held at Marsh’s Library, Dublin – will celebrate this important anniversary in a city where Philips spent the most productive and high-profile year of her literary career. It will offer the opportunity not only to re-evaluate Philips’s literary achievements, but also to reassess her influence on later seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century women’s writing.

The conference programme will include plenary lectures by Professor Elizabeth Hageman (University of New Hampshire) and Professor Sarah Prescott (Aberystwyth University). It will also include a visit to the site of Smock Alley Theatre, where Philips’s play Pompey was performed in 1663.

Proposals are invited for 20-minute papers. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Texts, canon and circulation
  • Philips’s life and afterlife
  • Language and form
  • Letter-writing
  • Drama
  • Translation
  • Philips as reader and critic
  • Archipelagic contexts
  • Politics and religion
  • Friendship and sexualities
  • Literary networks

Titles and abstracts (of up to 250 words) for papers should be sent to
katherinephilips350@gmail.com
by 31 August 2013. Please also include your name, institutional affiliation (where applicable), and email address.

A selection of essays based on papers from the conference will be published in a special issue of Women’s Writing in 2015.

Further information about the conference will be posted at katherinephilips350.wordpress.com.

We look forward to seeing you in Dublin in 2014!

Marie-Louise Coolahan and Gillian Wright, conference organisers

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15.

Sixth Biennial British Shakespeare Association Conference

Shakespeare: Text, Power, Authority

http ://shakespeare . stir . ac . uk/

University of Stirling, 3-6 July 2014

Keynote speakers

Professor Margreta de Grazia (University of Pennsylvania)

Professor Andrew Murphy (University of St Andrews)

Professor John Drakakis (University of Stirling)

Dr Colin Burrow (University of Oxford)

Dr Michael Bogdanov (Director, The Wales Theatre Company)

CALL FOR PAPERS

In the four hundred and fiftieth year since Shakespeare’s birth, this conference seeks to explore questions of authority for Shakespeare, in Shakespeare, and about Shakespeare. It aims to investigate the relationship between text, power, and authority, both in the writing of Shakespeare and in writing about Shakespeare. Shakespeare’s works ask us repeatedly to think about what constitutes authority, about where authority lies, and about the performance of authority. Shakespeare has also himself repeatedly been used as a form of cultural capital and authority, and we therefore also welcome contributions that explore some of the different ways in which his plays and poems have been deployed in various times and places. Shakespeare’s works prompt us to think about textual authority, too. What is textual authority? What makes one text more authoritative than another? How have ideas of textual authority changed over time, and what, politically, is at stake in these changes?

Topics may include, but are not limited to: 

  •          Shakespeare’s biblical and classical authorities
  •          Monarchy and sovereignty in Shakespeare’s works
  •          Democracy and Republicanism in Shakespeare’s works
  •          The representation and performance of power in Shakespeare’s works
  •          Editing Shakespeare
  •          Shakespeare and politics
  •          Shakespeare(s) past and present
  •          Re-writing and adapting Shakespeare
  •          Writing about Shakespeare
  •          Shakespeare’s critics and readers
  •          Shakespeare on stage and screen
  •          Shakespeare and copyright
  •          Shakespeare and nationhood/identity (in the year of the Scottish referendum on independence, we particularly welcome proposals on Shakespeare and Scotland)
  •          Shakespeare and institutional power
  •          Teaching Shakespeare
  •          Shakespeare and the visual arts

The conference programme will include lectures, papers, workshops, seminars, performances, and excursions.

We welcome proposals for papers or presentations (20 minutes), panels (90 minutes) or workshops (90 mins) on any aspect of the conference theme, broadly interpreted. Abstracts (250 words or less) should be sent to bsaconference2014@stir.ac.uk by 31 Jan 2014.

Participants must be members of the British Shakespeare Association at the time of the conference. Details of how to join can be found on the conference website:  http ://shakespeare . stir . ac . uk/

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16.

Please find below the Call for Papers for the Fifth Early Modern Symposium, Work in Progress: Bringing Art into Being in the Early Modern Period, which will take place at The Courtauld on Saturday 26 October 2013.

 Please send proposals of no more than 300 words along with a 150 word biography by 21 June 2013 to anya.matthews@courtauld.ac.uk and giulia.weston@courtauld.ac.uk

 For further information visit our website: http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/researchforum/events/2013/autumn/oct26_FifthEarlyModernSymposium.shtml 
 Research Forum

The Courtauld Institute of Art

Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN

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17.

Sensing the Sacred: Religion and the Senses, 1300 – 1800

Interdisciplinary conference, University of York, 21-22 June 2013

Confirmed keynote addresses from: Chris Woolgar (University of Southampton),
Nicky Hallett (University of Sheffield) and Matthew Milner (McGill University)

Religion has always been characterised as much by embodied experience as by abstract theological dispute. From the sounds of the adhān (the Islamic call to prayer), to the smell of incense in the Hindu Pūjā (a ritual offering to the deities), the visual emblem of the cross in the Christian tradition, and the ascetic practices of Theravada Buddhism, sensation is integral to a range of devotional practices. At the same time, the history of many faiths is characterised by an intense suspicion of the senses and the pleasures they offer.

 This international, interdisciplinary conference, to be held at the University of York will bring together scholars working on the role played by the senses in the experience and expression of religion and faith in the pre-modern world.

 The full conference opens on Friday 21st June, but there will be an opportunity to register early on Thursday evening, plus some informal events, including a Workshop for Postgraduates and a walking tour of York – see the programme for details.

 Postgraduate Workshop, Thursday 20th June, 4.30pm (venue: King’s Manor)

Places are limited and it is essential to book in advance.  Please contact the organisers to reserve a free place: sensingthesacred@york.ac.uk

For more info: http://www.york.ac.uk/crems/events/sensingthesacred/

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18.

Warburg Institute

Research Assistant in Art History (fixed term, 10 months)

The Production and Reading of
Polyphonic Music Sources, 1480–1530 (PRoMS)

 

Applications are invited for a research assistantship in Art History, as part of this major research project funded by the AHRC.

Funded by the AHRC since December 2010, the project ‘The Production and Reading of Music Sources, 1480–1530 (PRoMS)’ conducts the first systematic study of the mise-en-page of Renaissance sources of polyphonic music (http://www.proms.ac.uk). The project examines how the verbal text, musical notation and other visual devices interact on the pages of these manuscripts and printed books, and it explores the ways in which meaning is constructed through such interactions by their makers and users; it also transfers the results of the investigation to present-day performances.

The successful candidate will, in collaboration with the other members of the research team, contribute to an online catalogue of mise-en-page information for all extant sources from this period. S/he will also research and analyse two manuscript sources and their layout in detail with regard to strategies of production and use and adapt these and existing case studies to the online environment, as well as assist in the editing of the printed outputs.

The appointee, based at the Warburg Institute, will be an art historian with a doctorate or equivalent qualification; s/he will have specialist knowledge of art of the 15th and 16th centuries, specifically of manuscript illumination. Expertise in codicology and paleography will be essential, as will be willingness to engage actively in the development and preparation of the database and online resource. An interest in music of the period and knowledge of musical notation would be desirable, as would previous experience in working with databases and online environments, and an ability to engage with theoretical aspects of material culture of the late medieval/early modern period.  

The project is a collaboration between the University of Manchester, the Warburg Institute, Bangor University, the University of York, the Alamire Foundation (Leuven/Belgium), and the Department of Digital Humanities (DDH) at King’s College London.

This replacement post is tenable immediately for a fixed term of 10 months. The appointment will be to Level 7 (Research), currently £29,541–36,298 p.a. plus London Allowance of £2,134 p.a., making a total of £31,675–38,432 p.a.

Further details of the project, the assistantship and how to apply can be found at http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/. Informal enquiries may be addressed to the project director, Professor Thomas Schmidt, at thomas.schmidt@manchester.ac.uk.

The closing date for receipt of applications is 30 June 2013, and interviews will be held in London on Monday, 15 July 2013.

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19.

The nineteenth biennial New College Conference on Medieval and Renaissance Studies will take place 6–9 March 2014 in Sarasota, Florida. The program committee invites 250-word abstracts of proposed twenty-minute papers on topics in European and Mediterranean history, literature, art, music and religion from the fourth to the seventeenth centuries. Interdisciplinary work is particularly appropriate to the conference’s broad historical and disciplinary scope. Planned sessions are welcome; please see the new guidelines at http://www.newcollegeconference.org/cfp.

In memory of the conference’s founder Lee Daniel Snyder (1933–2012), we are pleased to announce the establishment of the Snyder Prize, which will be awarded for the first time in 2014. The prize carries an honorarium of $400 and will be given to the best paper presented at the conference by a junior scholar. Further details are available at the conference website.

The conference will be held on the campus of New College of Florida, the honors college of the Florida state system. The college, located on Sarasota Bay, is adjacent to the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, which will offer tours arranged for conference participants. Sarasota is noted for its beautiful public beaches, theater, food, art and music. Average temperatures in March are a pleasant high of 77F (25C) and a low of 57F (14C).

More information will be posted on the conference website as it becomes available, including submission guidelines, prize details, plenary speakers, conference events, and area attractions:

http://www.newcollegeconference.org

The deadline for abstracts is 15 September 2013. Send inquiries to info@newcollegeconference.org and abstracts to:

abstracts@newcollegeconference.org

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20.

POSTGRADUATE RESEARCH TRAINING COURSES

Summer 2013

Each year the IHR runs a wide-ranging and extensive programme of training in skills for historical researchers from universities throughout the UK. Using a range of teaching approaches (workshops, seminars, lectures, hands-on practicals and visits), important and specialised skills are explained and explored by expert practitioners. Courses are short (from one day to one term), cover the whole range of necessary skills – from archival use and languages to databases and the internet – and are priced to be within the means of students. Further details and registration forms for all courses are available at the Institute’s website at: http://www.history.ac.uk/research-training

 Archival Research Skills

 Methods and Sources for Historical Research (15-19 July 2013)

A week-long introduction to finding and gaining access to primary sources for historical research in archives, museums and online through an intensive programme of lectures and archival visits. Repositories to be visited will include the British Library, the National Archives, the Parliamentary Archives and the Wellcome Library amongst many others. Fee £225. http://www.history.ac.uk/research-training/courses/methods-and-sources

 General Historical Skills

Local History Summer School (4 – 6 July 2013)

After its extremely successful inauguration in 2012, the Institute of Historical Research, in association with the Victoria County History, is very pleased to announce its second Summer School in Local History. This year the theme is ‘Local History in the Towns’. Through practical advice and example, students of the school will learn how to broaden and enrich their own local history projects, as well as having the opportunity to meet specialists and other researchers and to discuss their own work. The school will include sessions on ‘Sources and Approaches’, ‘People and Households’, ‘Space, Topography and the Built Environment’, ‘Urban Institutions’, ‘Business’ and ‘Pleasure’.. The fee is £175. http://www.history.ac.uk/research-training/courses/local-summer-school

 Information Technology Courses

 Databases for Historians (4-7 June 2013)

This four-day course introduces the theory and practice of constructing and using databases. Through a mixture of lectures and practical, hands-on, sessions, students will be taught both how to use and adapt existing databases, and how to design and build their own. No previous specialist knowledge apart from an understanding of historical analysis is needed. The software used is MS Access, but the techniques demonstrated can easily be adapted to any package. This course is open to postgraduate students, lecturers and all who are interested in using databases in their historical research. The course fee is £225. http://www.history.ac.uk/research-training/courses/databases-1

Information Technology Courses (cont.)

 Databases for Historians II: Practical Database Tools (25-27 July 2013)

The aim of this course is to develop the practical skills necessary for constructing and fully exploiting a database for use in historical research. Assuming a basic understanding of the conceptual issues in digitally managing information from historical sources, the course aims to introduce the specific tools and techniques required for improving the utility of the database from the data entry stage, through to the generation and presentation of analysis. The course consists of ‘hands-on’ practical sessions in which students are provided with practical guidance on employing these techniques through the use of Microsoft Access. Familiarity with the basic concepts of database use is required: participants should be confident working with Microsoft Access, and should have some knowledge of working with data tables and simple queries. The course fee is £180. http://www.history.ac.uk/research-training/courses/databases-2

Internet Sources for Historical Research (3 June 2013)

This course provides an intensive introduction to use of the internet as a tool for serious historical research. It includes sessions on academic mailing lists, usage of gateways, search engines and other finding aids, and on effective searching using Boolean operators and compound search terms, together with advice on winnowing the useful matter from the vast mass of unsorted data available, and on the proper caution to be applied in making use of online information. The fee for the course is £100. http://www.history.ac.uk/research-training/courses/internet-research

Textual Analysis with Computers (Two half-days: 11 and 18 June 2013)

Researchers in the social sciences and humanities are increasingly using computers to manage, organise and analyse qualitative data, that is, non-numerical data from textual sources. This one-day workshop introduces historians and archivists to this rapidly growing field, explaining both its strengths as an analytical approach and, more practically, how to set about it. Participants will learn how to use the most recent version of NVivo, a package in the NUD*IST stream of software from QSR designed to help manage, organise and analyse qualitative data, with particular attention being paid to its use for historical research projects. Fee £100. http://www.history.ac.uk/research-training/courses/textual-analysis

For further information and application forms see http://www.history.ac.uk/research-training or contact Dr Simon Trafford at Institute of Historical Research, University of London, Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU or by email at ihr.training@sas.ac.uk

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21.

‘Exiturus: In Between Times and Spaces on the Early Modern Stage’

London Renaissance Seminar

Saturday 29th June 2013, 13.00-16.00

The Keynes Library, School of Arts, Birkbeck, University of London, 46 Gordon Square, London, WC1H 0PD

In ‘A Dictionary of Stage Directions in English Drama, 1580-1642′, Alan Dessen and Leslie Thomson define ‘exiturus’ as ‘offers to go’, or ‘going’. A rare stage direction, ‘exiturus’ applies to characters who are in the process of leaving, somewhere between on and off stage, on the edges of the tiring house or stage door. For this seminar, we have brought together scholars interested in liminal times and spaces on the early modern stage. Papers will discuss the nature of on- and off-stage fictional worlds and characters who inhabit the ambiguous times and places between those worlds, the representation of waiting and delay on the stage, and the performance of transitional and transformative identities (in temporal as well as spatial terms) in early modern drama.

 13.00-13.30: Coffee

 13.30-14.30:  Panel 1

‘Ere I Go’: Time, Space, and the Act of Leaving in King Lear

Matthew Wagner, University of Surrey

‘Tis very like my wife’s voice’: Echo, Time and Identity on the Early Modern Stage

Sarah Lewis, King’s College London

14.30-15.00: Tea

 15.00-16.00: Panel 2

‘Shall I draw the curtain?’: Playing with Boundaries in the Discovery Space

Sarah Dustagheer, King’s College London

Prosper on the top (invisible): Folio stage directions

Emma Smith, Hertford College, Oxford

 The London Renaissance Seminar meets at Birkbeck College to debate issues in the study of the literature and culture of the Renaissance. All interested are welcome to attend.

Organisers: Sarah Dustagheer (sarah.dustagheer@kcl.ac.uk) and Sarah Lewis (sarah.lewis@kcl.ac.uk) Mailing list:  t.f.healy@sussex.ac.uk LRS contact: s.wiseman@bbk.ac.uk

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22.

The Department of Scandinavian Studies (SELCS, UCL) and the Visual and Material Culture Research Centre (Kingston University) are pleased to invite you to:

 Sculptural Mobilities:

Tracing the flows of sculptural artworks between the Nordic Countries and Europe from the early modern period to the present day.

2nd and 3rd July 2013

Film screening – One-day Symposium – Exhibition

Histories of sculpture within the Nordic region are arguably under-studied and the region’s influence upon and translation of influences from the wider Europe remain insufficiently traced. Our symposium will seek to emphasise the Nordic Countries’ important role as an interstice between the East, West and the North, and to bring to light individual histories of sculptural mobility from the early modern period onwards.

Please register at: http://sculpturalmobilities.eventbrite.co.uk  

If you have any questions about the event, please don’t hesitate to contactus: Dr Elettra Carbone (elettra.carbone@ucl.ac.uk) and  Dr Sara Ayres (s.ayres@kingston.ac.uk).

Programme:

2 July 2013, 7.30pm: Screening and Social Event

Location: Wilkins Gustav Tuck Lecture Theatre, UCL

Thorvaldsen (1949) by Carl Theodor Dreyer

Screening and lecture by Dr Claire Thomson, Lecturer in Scandinavian Film and Head of UCL Scandinavian Studies

We are grateful to the Danish Film Institute for permission to screen ‘Thorvaldsen’.

The film screening will be followed by an informal reception in the Wilkins North Cloisters, UCL. 

3 July 2013, 9.00am-7.00pm: One-day Symposium

Location: Wilkins Haldane Room, UCL

9.00am-9.30pm                                                                       

Introduction and Welcome 

Dr Sara Ayres and Dr Elettra Carbone

Dr Claire Thomson and Professor Fran Lloyd

9.30am-11.00am Panel 1: Courtly Patronage and Sculptural Mobilities

Dr Francesco Freddolini, Assistant Professor of Art History at Luther College, University of Regina, Canada: Denmark and the International Mobility of Italian Sculpture, c. 1709-1725

Cynthia Osiecki, PhD Fellow, Interdisciplinary Research Training Group `Baltic Borderlands´ at the Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität, Greifswald: The Import of Flemish Sculpture into Sweden’s Courts in the Second half of the Sixteenth Century

Dr Kristoffer J Neville, Alexander von Humboldt Fellow at the Technical University in Berlin: A Gothic Neptune. Georg Labenwolff’s Sculpture for the Danish Court, 1575-1583

11.00am-11.30am Coffee break

11.30am-1.00pm Panel 2: Danish Myth, Italian Maestro: The Unveiling of Bertel Thorvaldsen

Stig Miss, Director of The Thorvaldsen Museum: The Making of Sculptural Awareness in Copenhagen: The Contribution of the Works of Thorvaldsen

Dr Elettra Carbone, Teaching Fellow in Norwegian, University College London:Reading Sculpture: The Remediation of Thorvaldsen’s Sculpture in Printed Culture

Professor David Bindman, the Emeritus Durning-Lawrence Professor of the History of Art, University College London: The Original Drawings for Thiele’s biography of Thorvaldsen in the UCL Library

1.00pm – 2.00pm Lunch break (lunch provided)

During the lunch break there will be time to view the one-day exhibitionRediscovered: Unique Thorvaldsen Portfolios held by UCL Special Collections alongside Karin Lowenadler’s Standing Male Nude (1936) Location: UCL Art Museum

Location: UCL Art Museum

2.00pm-3.30pm Panel 3: Post-War Sculptural Exchange between Britain and the Nordic Region                                                          

Professor Frances A Lloyd, Associate Dean Research & Enterprise, Faculty of Art, Design & Architecture, Kingston University: “Back in from the Cold”: Karin Jonzen’s Commissions for the World Health Organisation

Christina Brandberg, PhD Candidate, University of Hull: Henry Moore in the Nordic Countries: the first two one-man-shows in 1952

Dr Sara Ayres, Postdoctoral Researcher, Faculty of Art Design and Architecture, Kingston University: Transfiguring Memorials in Norway and Britain

3.30pm-4.00pm  Coffee break

4.00pm-5.30pm Panel 4: Curatorial Mobilities

Linda Hinners, Curator of Paintings and Sculpture, National Museum, Stockholm:Establishing a Platform for National Sculpture Production: The Recruitment of French Sculptors to Sweden during the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries 

Liisa Lindgren, Senior Curator, Parliament of Finland, Helsinki: Sculpture Hand in Glove with Architecture: The Sculpture Collection at the Finnish Parliament

Dr Marjorie Trusted, Senior Curator of Sculpture, V&A: Medieval Scandinavia and Victorian South Kensington

5.30pm-6.00pm Concluding Remarks and Final Discussion: Chaired by Dr Marjorie Trusted of the V&A 

6.00pm-7.00pm Drinks and Networking  

Location: Wilkins Haldane Room, UCL  

We are very grateful to the Henry Moore Foundation and the UCL Grand Challenges for their generous support.

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23.

Northern Renaissance Seminar

Writing the Renaissance North

Saturday 22nd June 2013, 10:00am-4:30pm

Sheffield Hallam University, Room 921, Owen Building, City Campus

(http://www.shu.ac.uk/university/visit/find-us/citycampus-map.pdf)

Please contact renaissancenorth@yahoo.co.uk to register.

Keynote Speaker: Professor James Loxley (University of Edinburgh)

This one-day symposium will focus on the ways in which the idea of the north was understood, imagined and represented in the writing of the early modern period. The papers will consider early modern literary and cultural engagements with the north, both as a geographical space and an intellectual concept. The topics explored in the papers will include: the political ideas associated with the north; the roles of Scotland and the north of England in shaping the political landscape of the British isles; the ambivalence of the cultural presence of the north in relation to English and British identity; the ways in which the north figured in debates about transgressive behaviour, such as political insurrection and witchcraft; and the effect of the north upon the afterlives of literary texts in biographical narratives and modern dramatic performances. Professor Loxley’s keynote paper will examine the recently discovered manuscript account of Ben Jonson’s walk to Edinburgh and consider the contrasting topographical constructions of north and south, and of England and Scotland.

There is no registration fee and refreshments will be provided, but we do require you to email us in advance to book a place: renaissancenorth@yahoo.co.uk.

10:00 Arrival and Coffee

10:15 Session One

Harriet Phillips (Cambridge University), ‘York, York, for my money: merry ballads and the Tudor North.’

Dr Chris Butler (Sheffield Hallam University), ‘“Lancastrian Spenser”? How Far North Did He Go?’

Sheilagh Ilona O’Brien (University of Queensland), ‘“Pull for the poultry, fowl, and fish, For empty shall not be a dish”: Descriptions of sabbats and witchcraft in The Late Lancashire Witches.

11:45 Coffee

12:00 Session Two

Dr Sarah Dewar-Watson (University of Sheffield), ‘History, Tragedy and Mary Queen of Scots.’

James Mawdesley (University of Sheffield), ‘Royalism and the Northern clergy: Exploring clerical allegiances in the Diocese of Carlisle during the English civil wars and republic.’

1:00 Lunch

2:00 Keynote Paper

Professor James Loxley (University of Edinburgh), ‘Ben Jonson’s Road North.’

3:00 Coffee

3:15 Session Three

Dr Alisa Manninen (University of Tampere), ‘Macbeth, King James and the Anglicization of Royal Power.’

Dr Kate Wilkinson (Sheffield Hallam University), ‘“Impossible for the Production of Shakespeare”: Speaking Shakespeare in Northern and Speaking Northern in Shakespeare.’

4:15 Closing Remarks: Professor Lisa Hopkins (Sheffield Hallam University).

 4:30 End of symposium.

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24.

Lady Jane Lumley, Iphigenia at Aulis (c. 1555)
performed  by The Rose Company, directed by Emma Rucastle
8.30 pm, Tuesday 9 July, 2013
Minghella Theatre, University of Reading


‘The Tragedie of Euripedes called Iphigeneia’  was first ‘translated out of Greake into Englisshe’ c.1555  not by a male classicist but ‘by Lady Jane Lumley’, as the title page of her script announces.
Lumley’s prose translation of the tragedy, where Iphigenia is to be sacrificed in Aulis so that the Greek ships can sail to Troy, emphasizes the heroine’s agency. Iphigenia transcends the arguments between her father (the Greek leader Agamemnon), and her mother Clytemnestra, declaring ‘I will offer my selfe willing to deathe, for my countrie’. At the same time, Lumley’s stark prose emphasizes Agamemnon’s cruelty and the raw pain of parting felt by the family. Her translation is daring in finding moments of dark comedy in the ludicrous situations faced by the protagonists. It also speaks out against a tradition of male, military valour, since Lumley’s Greek hero is Iphigenia.   
The Rose Company was established in 2013 out of the love of classic and historical performance texts and a belief in gender justice. This first production represents their commitment to bringing historical texts to contemporary life.
Tickets £5 on the door. To book a seat for the performance, email Jan Cox: j.f.cox@reading.ac.uk

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25.

REVISITING EARLY MODERN PROPHECIES (c.1500-c.1815)”

 26–28 June, 2014 

Goldsmiths, London

The Reformation dramatically changed Europe’s religious and political landscapes within a few decades. The Protestant emphasis on translating the Scriptures into the vernacular and the developments of the printing press rapidly gave increased visibility to the most obscure parts of the Bible. Similarly, Spanish and Italian mystics promoted a spiritual regeneration of the Catholic Church during the Counter-Reformation. Prophecies, whether of biblical, ancient or popular origin, as well as their interpretations gradually began reaching a wider audience, sparking controversies throughout all levels of society across Europe. In recent years, new research has eroded the long standing historiographical consensus of an increasing secularisation accelerated by the Enlightenment, which allegedly cast away beliefs in prophecies and miracles as outmoded. The multiplication of case studies on millenarian movements suggests a radically different picture, yet many questions remain. How did prophecies evolve with the politico-religious conjunctions of their time? Who read them? How seriously were they taken?

This three-day, international conference will aim to answer these questions by bringing together scholars from around the world to reassess the importance of prophecies from the Reformation to the French Revolution and beyond. We therefore invite papers and panel proposals on prophecy in Europe and the Mediterranean world between approximately 1500 and 1800. Possible topics may include, but are not limited to: apocalyptic predictions, the Antichrist, millenarianism, irenicism, wonders and miracles, astrology and divination, ecumenical movements, religious utopias, mystical networks, enthusiasts and female mystics.‌

Keynote speakers:

Prof. Irena Backus (Geneva)
Prof. Nigel Smith (Princeton)
Prof. Christopher Rowland (Oxford)

Other confirmed speakers:

Federico Barbierato
Jürgen Beyer
Vittoria Feola
David Finnegan

Mercedes García-Arenal

Crawford Gribben
Jacques Halbronn
Warren Johnston
Nick McDowell
Jo Spaans

Proposals for 20-minute papers in English (maximum 300 words) are invited, and should be sent by 31 October 2013 to either of the conference organisers:

Dr Ariel Hessayon  a.hessayon(@gold.ac.uk)
Dr Lionel Laborie  l.laborie(@gold.ac.uk)

More info at: http://www.gold.ac.uk/history/research/panaceasociety/propheciesconference/

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26.

Fourth International Conference on Religion and Spirituality in Society

29-30 April 2014

Universidad Nacional Costa Rica
Heredia, Costa Rica

Religion and Spirituality in Society is an international conference, a cross-disciplinary scholarly journal, a book imprint and an online knowledge community which, together, set out to describe, analyze and interpret the role of religion and spirituality in society. The bases of this endeavor are cross-disciplinary. The intellectual project is neutral with respect to the agendas of particular religions or explicit counterpoints to religion such as agnosticism or atheism. These media are intended to provide spaces for careful, scholarly reflection and open dialogue.

 For more information: http://religioninsociety.com/the-conference

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27.

Ways of Knowing: Graduate Conference on Religion at Harvard Divinity School

 Oct 25-6, 2013 in Cambridge, Massachusetts

 CFP Deadline July 1, 2013

 The Science, Religion, and Culture Program at Harvard Divinity School announces the second annual graduate student conference on religion. In our inaugural conference, held in October 2012, eighty students and early career scholars representing twenty-five different graduate programs from across the United States and the world gathered to present their research.

Following the success of last year’s conference, this multi-day event will be comprised of thematic panels that cross religious traditions, academic disciplines, and intellectual and theological commitments. The conference aims at promoting interdisciplinary discussion of prevailing assumptions (both within and outside the academy) about the differentiation, organization, authorization, and reproduction of various modes of knowing and acting in relation to religion.

We invite paper proposals representative of a variety of theoretical, methodological, and disciplinary approaches and that explore religious practices especially in relation to identities, authorities, discourses, texts, and experiences. We welcome projects that utilize all sorts of theoretical tools, including discourse analysis, gender theory, race theory, disability theory, post-colonial theory, performance theory, and ritual theory. Papers may focus on a specific period, region, tradition, person or group, and/or on a set of practices, texts, doctrines, or beliefs. Projects that are primarily sociological, anthropological, theological, ethical, textual, historical, or philosophical are welcome, as are projects indebted to multiple disciplines.

This year’s conference will also feature two thematic modules. Several panels will be devoted to each of the following themes:

1) “Constructions of Autonomy in Early Modern and Modern Contexts”

2) “Ritual as a Category of Religious Experience”

Proposals are to be submitted to gradreligionconference@hds.harvard.edu by Monday, July 1, 2013. Please go to our website for further details on the Call for Papers and submission instructions:

www.hds.harvard.edu/gradreligionconference

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28.

Please find below details of the Renaissance Art and Music seminar:

 Counterfeit Renaissance (II): Experiencing Art with Music – which will take place Thursday 27 June (18.00) in the Research Forum South Room (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission. No advance booking required.

Further information here: http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/researchforum/events/2013/summer/jun27_RenaissanceArtandMusic.shtml

 

Best wishes,

Research Forum

The Courtauld Institute of Art

Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN

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Newsletter 39

By Alexander Samson, on 17 May 2013

  1.  University of Roehampton Postgraduate Research Studentship in Early Modern Literature and Culture. Deadline 31st July.
  2. Dante: On The Peak Of Darkness, UCL Special Collections Event Saturday 18th May.
  3. London Aesthetics Forum (Institute of Philosophy), Wednesday 15th May.
  4. Call for Papers: Renaissance Society of America, 27-29 March 2014.
  5. Birkbeck Medieval and Renaissance Summer School, June 2013.
  6. PhD studentship on the experiences of war widows and orphans in the north of England during the 1640s and 1650s, National Archives and University of Leicester.
  7. Call for Papers: Renaissance Society of America New York, 27-29 March 2014
    “Patronage as Evidence for Early Modern Catholic Reform”.
  8. Call for Papers: RSA 27-29 March 2014 “Classical Receptions in Early Modern England”
  9. Art & Death – workshop 3 ‘Life after Death’, 23rd May, the Courtauld Institute.
  10. Call for Papers: ‘Work in Progress: Bringing Art into Being in the Early Modern Period’, 26th October 2013, The Courtauld Institute .
  11. Call for Papers: Renaissance Society of America, 27-29 March 2014, NYC: “Early Modern Authorship and Gender”.
  12. Registration open, and provisional programme: Harlaxton Medieval Symposium 2013, Language Networks in Medieval Britain, Tuesday 16th – Friday 19th July.
  13. Registration open: Power Manifest: Structures and Concepts of Ecclesiastical Authority, c.1100-c.1500. A one-day academic conference to be held at the Institute of Historical Research, Thursday 20 June 2013.
  14. V&A Project ShaLT (Shakespearean London Theatres).
  15. Call for Papers: Renaissance Society of America, 27-29 March 2014, NYC: “Early Modern Women in Public and Private”.
  16. UCL Society Culture and Belief seminar, Thursday 9th May 5.30pm, ‘Ritualising Time in an Age of Revolution: Exiled English Nuns, Cyclical History, and the French Revolution’.
  17. Call for Papers: Connecting cultures? An international conference on the history of teaching and learning foreign/second languages, 1500-2000, University of Nottingham July 2-5 2014.
  18. Call for Papers: Renaissance Society of America, 27-29 March 2014, NYC: “Early Modern Women Philosophers, Theologians, and Scientists”. Deadline extended to 1st June.
  19. Call for Papers: Renaissance Society of America, 27-29 March 2014, NYC: “Women’s Writing About Beauty in Early Modern England”.
  20. Symposium: ‘The World is Our House’: the seventeenth-century Hereford Cwm Jesuit Library in an international context, Friday 21 June 2013, Hereford Cathedral.
  21. Call for Papers: Panels from the RSA Division in Hispanic Literature, the Cervantes Society of America, and/or the Society for Renaissance and Baroque Hispanic Poetry – “Cervantes’s Library”, “The Intellectual Mileux of Renaissance Spanish Artists”, “Purloined Letters”, “Reimagining Time in the Early Modern Hispanic World”, “Poetry and the City”.
  22. Call for Panels: The Society for Early Modern Women, deadline 25th May.
  23. Visiting Professor Peter Stallybrass – events 14-16 May 2013, The Courtauld Institute.
  24. Forum on Early Modern Central Europe seminar, 9th May 5.15 pm, UCL-SSEES, 16 Taviton Street, London.
  25. Call for Papers: Renaissance Society of America, 27-29 March 2014, NYC: “ The image of Elizabeth I in Early Modern Spain”.
  26. Programme of Summer events run by the Centre for Renaissance & Early Modern Studies (CREMS), University of York.
  27. Colloquium: ‘Early Modern Approaches to the Imagination’, University of Warwick 17th July.
  28. The Renaissance at Birkbeck Events for Artweek, 22-23rd May: ‘Remembering Myself: Memory and Identity in the Renaissance’, Dr Adam Smyth, Dr Gillian Woods, Sue Wiseman; ‘Casta Paintings and the Colonial Body: Embodying Race in Spanish America’, Professor Rebecca Earle (Warwick); and ‘Mute Poetry, Speaking Pictures: A Book and Some Afterthoughts’, Professor Leonard Barkan. (Princeton).

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1.

 Postgraduate research studentship in Early Modern literature and culture

Following the success of the AHRC-funded Collaborative Doctoral Award collaboration with the National Maritime Museum (Royal Museums Greenwich), the University of Roehampton is pleased to announce a fully-funded 3-year postgraduate research studentship to start on 1 October 2013. The studentship will be a full bursary including Home/EU fees plus a Research Council level stipend for three years’ full-time doctoral study. The bursaries will be subject to annual review of student progress. The bursary rate for 2012-13 is currently £15,590. In addition a contribution towards project costs will be made available, with a minimum of £300 allocated.

Students on full bursaries are required to offer up to 6 hours a week teaching or other support to their departments for 40 weeks per year, or a total of 720 hours support over a three-year award. Candidates are also expected to play a full part in the research culture of their department and the university, and may be called on to act as ambassadors for the University, for example at marketing events.

Preference may be given to proposals that develop on-going work on the cultures of the Stuart courts broadly defined, such as the material, literary, theatrical, or gendered cultures and networks of the court and aristocracy. Interdisciplinary proposals are also welcome, as are projects focusing on literature or theatre.

The successful student will be based in the Department of English and Creative Writing at the University of Roehampton, London. The Department has recently appointed 5 new scholars to its teaching staff, consolidating our reputation for both traditional excellence and innovation, and has also benefited from the University’s substantial investment in its postgraduate community. The successful candidate will become part of an active and growing community of postgraduate scholars in a vibrant research culture with a track record of supervisorial success and established external collaborations with London institutions.

The Department is looking for a candidate of the highest quality, capable of submitting a Ph.D. thesis within 3 years. Applicants should have completed an MA degree in a relevant subject prior to the start of the studentship and may be required to complete additional research methods training in their first year of study. Applicants should also be able to demonstrate strong research capabilities and fluency in spoken and written English.

Interested applicants should contact Dr. Clare McManus to discuss their proposed projects (C.McManus@roehampton.ac.uk).

Please visit www.roehampton.ac.uk/courses/graduate-school to find out more about postgraduate research at Roehampton.

For more information about the studentships and to apply visithttp://www.roehampton.ac.uk/Courses/Graduate-School/Funding/

Deadline for applications: 31 July 2013

For all non-academic queries relating to the studentships, please contact the Graduate School on 020 8392 3619, e-mail graduateschool@roehampton.ac.uk.

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 2. 

 

Dante: On The Peak Of Darkness, UCL Special Collections Event Saturday 18th May at the Warburg Institute

http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/events/colloquia/dante-on-the-peak-of-darkness/

 UCL’s Dante Collection is extraordinarily complete and wide-ranging, with printed editions dating from the 1470s onwards, alongside the archive of Henry Clark Barlow, whose bequest forms the core of the collection. To celebrate the completion of a cataloguing project that gives access to the collection as a whole, and to look in depth at the Divina Commedia, UCL Special Collections, UCL Italian Department and the Warburg Institute invite you to a day devoted to Dante on Saturday 18 May. The programme includes introductions to Dante’s life and works, readings from his Divine Comedy, and an account of how the work survived in print. Early and rare editions from the collection will be on display, and facsimile copies of an Art Nouveau 1911 pocket edition will be available for sale. Details and online booking are available here: http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/events/colloquia/dante-on-the-peak-of-darkness/. (Early booking is advised.)

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 3.

 

London Aesthetics Forum (Institute of Philosophy)

Wednesday 15th May 2013
16.00 – 18.00 | Senate House, Senate Room
Malet Street London, WC1E 7HU

Tzachi Zamir (HUJI)

“The Inner Paradise: Philosophy-Poetry Warfare In Milton’s Paradise Lost

Recent attempts within Anglo-American aesthetics to delineate an intellectually fruitful relationship between philosophy and literature are usually proposed as compensatory epistemologies: literature overcomes limitations built into the traditional modes whereby philosophers construe knowledge- claims. But what if a major work of literature—as is the case in John Milton’s Paradise Lost—explicitly rejects philosophy’s objectives, holding that philosophy is implicated in the pursuit of a corrupt and unworthy form of knowing? From such a stance, philosophy’s shortcoming is — ironically — philosophical: if one genuinely seeks understanding, philosophy would send one down the wrong track. Poetry of such kind does not invite philosophers of literature to somehow harmonize the philosophy-literature divide. Instead, one is required to sharpen the philosophy-poetry disjunction, clarifying the stakes involved in keeping apart these distinct attitudes to acquiring knowledge, to leading a meaningful existence, and to the non-obvious relationships between these objectives..

The talk will be free and open to all. For more information please visit our websitewww.londonaestheticsforum.org

The London Aesthetics Forum (Institute of Philosophy) is generously supported by the British Society of Aesthetics

 

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 4.

 Call for Papers: Renaissance Society of America, 27-29 March 2014

Interdisciplinary panel exploring the contributions of Renaissance military men and their impact on transregional politics, their intellectual pursuits and the visual arts.

“Beyond the Battlefield: Men of War in Early Modern Society” Early modern warfare was conducted by a dynamic breed of military men. Many were educated nobles who regularly crossed back and forth between the battlefield and the court. Their military service provided them with skills that they leveraged into other spheres of life. It also connected them to multiple centers of power and allowed them to build influential transregional networks in which they served as agents of cultural, political, and social exchange. Largely the focus of military studies, these men were engaged in a wide range of activities and interests, and some became important figures in the European-wide Republic of Letters.

Embracing an interdisciplinary approach, this session seeks to reevaluate the figure of the mercenary commander by exploring the multi-faceted lives and contributions of these soldiers beyond the battlefield. Areas of investigation include, but are not limited to: cross-cultural influences, intellectual pursuits, courtly ambitions, diplomacy, regional and transregional exchange, and patronage of the arts.

To propose a 20-minute paper, kindly send your name, email, affiliation, paper title, abstract (150-word maximum), one-page cv and a list of keywords to Rebecca Norris at rn290@cam.ac.uk and Suzanne Sutherland Duchacek srsuther@stanford.edu. Submission deadline is 30 May 2013.

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 5.

 

Medieval and Renaissance Summer School

 

The 2013 Birkbeck Medieval and Renaissance Summer School will deliver exciting, cutting-edge research to postgraduates and early-career scholars, and will help participants develop crucial research skills. Hosted by Birkbeck, University of London, and located in the heart of Bloomsbury, the Summer School draws together some of Britain’s foremost scholars of Medieval and Renaissance literature, art, culture and history.Date: 26-28 June 2013
Time: 9.30am – 7.30pm each day
Cost: £32 Staff and students at Birkbeck and participating institutions / £62 EU delegates / £140 non-EU delegates
Venue: 43 Gordon Square, WC1H
Booking: Book your placeThis year’s theme is ‘On the River’. We will, of course, take in Shakespeare’s Bankside and the maritime riches of Greenwich as well as Walton’s fishermen. The programme also includes a hands-on workshop in the British Library map room; lectures by Professor Paul Strohm (Columbia) and Professor Julie Sanders (Nottingham). We hope to have a print workshop (back by popular demand), to visit Greenwich and discuss maps at the British Library. There will be opportunities to talk about your own research interests.Workshops and seminars will be led by Birkbeck staff including Anthony Bale, Zoltan Biedermann, Stephen Clucas, Jess Fenn, Adam Smyth, Sue Wiseman, Gillian Woods.

A limited number of scholarships will be available to students from Britain or overseas. These will vary in size but may be up to £100 plus full remission of the fee. Please send a one-page CV and a statement outlining your research interests and your reasons for applying for the scholarship (up to 350 words). These need to be submitted as word documents clearly labelled SCHOLARSHIPS. Please e-mail these to bmrss@bbk.ac.ukby Friday 31 May at 6pm.

And, of course, the Summer School will end with a party.

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 6.

 PhD studentship on the experiences of war widows and orphans in the north of England during the 1640s and 1650s

 The National Archives and The University of Leicester are pleased to invite applications for a three-year AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Partnership PhD Studentship, to commence on 1 October 2013. This studentship is one of six awarded to the Thames Consortium, which comprises three London-based institutions: the National Portrait Gallery, The National Archives, and the National Maritime Museum.

The collaborative doctoral project will focus on the strategies used by and on behalf of war widows and orphans in the north of England to obtain relief during the 1640s and 1650s. It would examine the language used in the petitions of high and low status women for military pensions, and their efforts at securing the arrears of pay of their deceased husbands. Further research questions would include petitions for redress represented their husbands’ service, in what ways petitions fashioned the widows as deserving, how they played upon magisterial expectations, in what ways petitions reflected feelings of entitlement, and how the information in petitions informs us on the ‘economy of makeshifts’.

The PhD will be based on extensive archival research among county archives in northern England and the State Papers collection in The National Archives. It is intended the studentship will inform knowledge exchange and impact beyond academia through the University of Leicester’s collaboration with the National Civil War Centre at Newark Museum scheduled to open in December 2014.

This project will be of interest to applicants with backgrounds in early modern history and gender studies. Expertise in the fields of women’s history and the British Civil Wars would be an advantage.

 The thesis will be supervised by Dr Andrew Hopper (Centre for English Local History, University of Leicester) and Dr Katy Mair (The National Archives).

The standard tuition fees and maintenance grant will be paid by the AHRC to the award holders.

Deadline for applications: 24 May 2013

Interviews will be held at the Centre for English Local History, Marc Fitch Historical Institute, 5 Salisbury Rd, Leicester, LE1 7QR in the week commencing the 24 June 2013.

For further information and for details on how to apply please visit:

http://www2.le.ac.uk

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/jobs/internships-info.htm

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 7. 

 Call for Papers: Renaissance Society of America New York, 27-29 March 2014
“Patronage as Evidence for Early Modern Catholic Reform”

This panel will engage with the possibility of examining the permeation of
reform ideas through patronage. This might include such topics as whether
the artistic patronage of the ecclesiastical and lay elite or the community
patronage of altars and confraternities in rural parishes or how early
modern Catholics chose to spend their money and devotional energy within the
Church, which can tell us something about the culture of early modern
Catholicism. Particularly in the growing popularity of “post-Tridentine”
saints and devotions, historians and art historians can see to what extent
the official reform goals of the Catholic Church spread among both elite and
non-elite Catholics from the sixteenth through eighteenth centuries. The
panel will focus on visual and historical evidence for the permeation of
reformed Catholic ideas by examining confraternities, devotion to new
saints, new devotional activities, parochial and altar dedications, and
artistic commissions.

We invite submissions of abstracts engaging with the spread or permeation of
Catholic reform through patronage from all geographical areas within the
Catholic World from the 16th-18th centuries. Please send abstracts of no
more than 250 words and a brief CV to Celeste McNamara
(celeste.mcnamara@u.northwestern.edu)
and Vesna Kamin Kajfez (vesna.kaminkajfez@gmail.com) by June 5, 2013.

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 8.

 Call for Papers: RSA 27-29 March 2014 New York, NY

Classical Receptions in Early Modern England
This panel will explore the reception of Greek and Roman antiquity in Early Modern England. Papers may discuss editions of ancient authors, translation practice and theory, literary and cultural appropriations, and transformations into new works of art and literature. As necessary, discussions may also explore Continental forerunners and intermediaries.

Confessional Contest and Compromise in Early Modern England
This panel will explore the clashes and accommodations of religious doctrines and devotions in Early Modern England. The main focus will be on Protestant and Catholic expressions, but treatments of Judaism, Islam, and other religions will be welcome. Previous discussions have treated print and manuscript treatises, prayer books, recusant poetry, biography, and prose, the Virgin Mary under duress, and drama (including Shakespeare).

For either panel please send a 150-word abstract and one-page CV by Monday 3 June to Robert S. Miola, Gerard Manley Hopkins Professor of English and Lecturer in Classics at Loyola University Maryland (rmiola@loyola.edu).

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 9.

Art & Death – workshop 3:

‘Life after Death’– which will take place on Thursday 23 May (10.00 – 12.30) in the Research Forum South Room (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Further information (incl. programme and abstracts) available online here:http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/researchforum/events/2013/summer/may23_ArtandDeath3.shtml

 

Open to all, free admission. No booking is necessary

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10.

 Work in Progress: Bringing Art into Being in the Early Modern Period

Fifth Early Modern Symposium, Saturday 26 October 2013, The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN

 CALL FOR PAPERS
Did I request thee, Maker, from my Clay

To mould me Man? Did I solicit thee

From darkness to promote me?

John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book X (1667)

Complex narratives spanning months, years or even decades exist behind the single bracketed date attached to artworks to indicate their moment of execution or completion. This one-day symposium will explore the ‘ante-natal’ development of early modern art from its conception to its ‘quickening’ and eventual birth. The process fascinated contemporary theorists and continues to raise questions for modern art historians. For example, when was an artistic project considered finished or unfinished? What terms were used to indicate the various stages of bringing an artwork into being, and what implications did these terms have for authorship and authenticity? The creation of art is not the work of a moment or achieved at a single stroke; it involves a series of transpositions from idea to study or plan, from sketch to painting, from plan to building and so on. How did early modern art reflect on the process of its own making?

We invite 20-minute papers considering artistic ‘work in progress’ in the early modern period (c.1550-1800):

- what processes of translation and transposition were involved in moving art out of the realm of ideas into the material world? Papers might analyse and discuss the evolution of an artwork from concept to creation or construction and consider each phase of development in turn. This could involve close examination of plans, drawings, studies, sketches, maquettes or bozzetti for the same artistic project and consideration of how each stage shaped the end product

 - what did contemporary ideas, religious beliefs, and philosophical theories (those of Spinoza, for example) have to say about creativity – and how might these have informed the conception of the early modern work of art? As Peter Conrad (Creation: Artists, Gods & Origins, 2007) has suggested, ‘any investigation of art has to ponder the notion of God’s creation’. Vasari paid homage to the ‘ultimate initiator’ in his Lives of the Most Eminent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects and described Genesis as the adventures of a ‘creative intellect’

 - how might the early modern preoccupation with the idea of progress have been relevant to the creation of art?

 - was creativity gendered in the period? Did the early modern version of sexual reproduction – in which women simply encased the precious, implicitly masculine kernel of creativity – affect contemporaries’ understanding of the way art was generated?

 - can current theories and methodologies illuminate the process of art-making in the period? What can material data and scientific research methods, such as infra-red reflectography, dendro-chronology and chemical analysis of pigments, tell us?

 - what happened when artistic aspiration collided with social and political realities or encountered financial and practical constraints? Papers might describe artistic indecision and frustration and examine the choices and creative opportunities that resulted. How did projects come to be altered or radically revised in scale and ambition? What were the implications of rejection in such cases as Caravaggio’s ‘St Matthew and the Angel’ for the Contarelli chapel in San Luigi dei Francesi?

 - drawing on Victor Stoichita’s study of ‘meta-painting’, papers could explore how early modern artworks reflected on their own bringing into being and making. Vermeer’s ‘The Painter in his Studio’ (c.1666), ‘Las Meninas’ by Velázquez (1656-7), and Panini’s ‘Modern Rome’ and its pendant ‘Ancient Rome’ (1757) are examples of the many artworks from the period that take the process of artistic creation as their subject.
We invite proposals from graduate students, junior scholars, curators, and conservators for papers that explore one or more of the above-mentioned issues in any artistic medium (painting, sculpture, architecture, decorative arts, print media, graphic arts and the intersections between them). Theoretical and technical approaches are equally welcome.

 We do not at present have a budget for travel and accommodation for speakers. Students from outside London are encouraged to apply to their institutions for funding to participate in the symposium.

Please send proposals of no more than 300 words along with a 150 word biography by 21 June 2013 to anya.matthews@courtauld.ac.uk  and giulia.weston@courtauld.ac.uk

 Organised by Anya Matthews and Giulia Martina Weston (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

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 11.

Call for Papers: Renaissance Society of America, 27-29 March 2014, NYC: “Early Modern Authorship and Gender”

Early work on literary authorship stressed the concept’s associations with men and masculinity—and, hence, its difficulties for women. Recent scholars have nuanced such claims, focusing not only on early modern women’s widespread involvement in literary culture, but also on the slippages and tensions that arise in Renaissance discussions of authorship and gender. What happens to our understanding of the early modern literary field when we consider the gendering of authorship as shifting and contested?

 This panel, sponsored by the Rutgers Medieval-Renaissance Colloquium, welcomes papers that investigate the roles that gender plays in early modern theories, practices, and representations of authorship. How are the gendered aspects of such theories depicted, and how are they unsettled, reaffirmed, and reshaped in literary discourses? What changes did Renaissance writers make to the models of authorship that they inherited from the ancient and medieval worlds, and how did gender factor into these adaptations and appropriations? To what uses were various figures of gendered authorship, or of the female author in particular, put in the Renaissance? How might we conceptualize cross-gendered writing (men writing as women, or vice versa) beyond the usual metaphor of “ventriloquism”?

 Please submit a 150 word abstract and a one-page C.V. to Brian Pietras (bpietras@eden.rutgers.edu) by June 1st.

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 12.

Harlaxton Medieval Symposium 2013: Language Networks  in Medieval Britain

Convened by Mary Carruthers

Tuesday 16th – Friday 19th July 2013, Harlaxton Manor, Harlaxton, Lincs.

 Provisional programme:

 Tuesday, 16th July

 2:00 Welcome by Gordon Kingsley (Principal of Harlaxton College) and Christian Steer (Symposium Secretary)

2.10-2.15         Introduction to the Programme, Mary Carruthers

2.15–3.30        Languages in the Professions: I

Linda M. Voigts, ‘Mixing and melding English and Latin in medical writings of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries’

Peter M. Jones, ‘The language of surgery in 14th century England: John of Arderne’s innovations’

3:30 Tea

4.15- 6.00        Multilingual Texts and Manuscripts

Ad Putter, ‘Macaronic Love Letters from an Abbot to a Nun’

Elizabeth Archibald, ‘Macaronic Writing in England and on the Continent: A Comparative View’

Neil Cartlidge, ‘Cultures in Confrontation in a 13th c Multilingual English Anthology (BL MS Harley 978’)

6:15 Supper

7.30 Visit to Grantham church (own arrangements) (arrive approx. 7.45)

9:00 Bar

 

Wednesday, 17th July

7:00 – 8:30 Breakfast

8:45- 10:30      Images and Words at Play

Lucy Freeman Sandler, ‘Word Images in the British Library Bohun Psalter and Hours’ (British Library MS Egerton 3277)

Kathryn Smith, ‘Word and Image in the Taymouth Hours (British Library MS Yates Thompson 13)’

Ann Payne, ‘Canting or allusive heraldry (armes parlantes) in manuscript illumination’

10:30 Coffee

11.15 – 1:00     Languages in the Professions: II

ChrisWoolgar, ‘The language of food and cooking’

Alex Buchanan, ‘Professional practices?  Architectural vocabulary in England in the later Middle Ages’

Paul Brand, ‘The languages of the courtroom in England c.1300’

1:00 Lunch

2:00- 3.00 Nicholas Orme, ‘Schools and Language in Medieval England’

3.15 – 4.00  David Griffith, ‘Texts and readers in later medieval England: an epigraphical perspective’

4.00 – 4.30 Tea

4:30- 6:15        Multilingual inscriptions

Elizabeth New, ‘Signed with a Seal: text and image on personal seals from medieval England and Wales’

Michael Carter, ‘Latin and vernacular inscriptions: Cistercian monasteries in northern England at the end of the Middle Ages’

Sarah Macmillan, ‘Women’s words? Gendered speech and silence in the medieval English parish church’

6:30 Supper

8:00- 9:00 Concert

9:00 Bar

 

Thursday, 18th July

 7:00- 8:30 Breakfast

9:00 – 10:30     Music and literature I (with singers): ‘Multilingual networks in England and northern Francophonia’

Ardis Butterfield, ‘Reading Lyric Networks’

Helen Deeming, ‘Multilingual networks in twelfth- and thirteenth-century song’

10:30- 11:00 Coffee

11:00- 1:00      Music and literature II (with singers): ‘Multilingual networks’

Yolanda Plumley, ‘The transmission and circulation of Machaut’s lyrics, north and south’

Janet van den Meulen, ‘A Call to Arms or the Art of Framing Ballads in Jean de le Mote’s Regret Guillaume’

Elizabeth Eva Leach, Response and Comments (to both sessions)

1:00 Picnic lunch at Harlaxton

2:00 Excursion to Marholm and Castor churches

7.00 Reception in bar

7:30 Symposium Dinner in the Great Hall (black tie optional)

 

Friday, 19th July

 7:00- 8:30 Breakfast

9.30 – 10.30  Alastair Minnis, ‘Discourse beyond death: The Language of Paradise in Middle English Poetry’

10.30 – 11.15: Coffee

11.15 – 1.00    Translations and macaronic works

Roger Dahood, ‘Medieval Scribes, Modern Translations, and Supposed Jewish Ritual Cannibalism in the Anglo-Norman Hugo de Lincolnia’

Aisling Byrne, ‘Religious Orders and the Translation of Secular Narratives in Fifteenth-Century Ireland’

Jessica Brantley, ‘Language Mixing in the English Book of Hours’  

1:00 Lunch and departure

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 13.

 Power Manifest: Structures and Concepts of Ecclesiastical Authority, c.1100-c.1500
A one-day academic conference to be held at the Institute of Historical Research, Thursday 20 June 2013.

This conference will address ecclesiastical authority in diverse permutations during the High and Late Middle Ages, investigating new directions in church history in Europe and the Latin East by interposing institutional scholarship, and work on cultural history and the arts. Particular focus will be on the period between the twelfth and the fifteenth centuries. 

Keynote speakers are Brenda Bolton (London), David d’Avray (UCL) and Malcolm Vale (St John’s, Oxford). Further information: powermanifest.wordpress.com.

Poster (including full programme of speakers) attached.
 
Please register before 5 June: powermanifestconference@gmail.com (conference fees: £12 postgraduates; £22 full rate).

With the kind support of Ashgate Publishing, IHR, RHUL, UCL, SSCLE.

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 14.

 Here is some information about a project run by the V&A that may be of interest:

It is an Arts and Humanities Research Council funded project called ShaLT (Shakespearean London Theatres) that aims to make people aware of all the theatres in the Early Modern period. There are a number of different outputs, including the main one which is a map (in online, paper and app form) that takes you on different walks around central London to see where the theatres would have been. There is also going to be filmed documentaries and scenes demonstrating different theatre spaces and repertoires. You can find out more at www.shalt.org.uk. The thing that may be of most interest is the series of lectures taking place over the summer at the V&A, details of which can be found on their website.

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15.

 Early Modern Women in Public and Private

A session at the annual meeting of the Renaissance Society of America,

27-29 March 2014, New York City.

This session explores the relationship of early modern women to shifting conceptions of the public and private realms as well as domesticity. How did early modern women, especially early modern women writers, articulate their own place in the public realm or different spheres that were conceived as public to varying degrees? How, when, and why did women see themselves as members of “counterpublics”? How did they represent public and private spaces in different types of writing or in visual arts and objects? Conversely, how did men represent women in these spaces? Interdisciplinary and cross-cultural approaches are welcome.

 Please e-mail an abstract and a brief curriculum vitae to Martine van Elk at Martine.vanElk@csulb.edu as soon as possible, but no later than June 1, 2013.

This session will be sponsored by the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies at California State University, Long Beach

************************************************************ 

 16.

 REMINDER UCL Society Culture and Belief seminar on Thursday

Just a reminder that we will have our final Society Culture and Belief seminar of the year this Thursday 9 May, 5.30; Caroline Watkinson will be speaking on

Ritualising Time in an Age of Revolution: Exiled English Nuns, Cyclical History, and the French Revolution.

Please note we will be in a different room for this session: Torrington Room (104), on the first floor of Senate House.

Hope to see you there!

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 17.

 Connecting cultures? An international conference on the history of teaching and learning foreign/second languages, 1500-2000, University of Nottingham July 2-5 2014

This conference will be the first in the United Kingdom dedicated to the history of modern language teaching and learning. We invite submissions for papers on any aspect of the history of foreign/second language teaching and/or learning. Comparative approaches, exploring commonalities and differences between different language teaching traditions, and/or between different countries, are particularly welcome.

The keynote speakers will be Michael Byram (Professor Emeritus, University of Durham), Giovanni Iamartino (Professor, University of Milan) and Marcus Reinfried (Professor, University of Jena)

The conference will include a lead strand on Culture in the teaching of Foreign/Second Languages: Theoretical Conceptions, Curricula and Textbooks.

 We warmly welcome proposals for further themed panels (minimum of three papers) on any aspect of the history of teaching and/or learning languages.

 Please send abstracts of around 300 words (and proposals for themed panels) to historyofmfl@nottingham.ac.uk by December 1, 2013. The conference languages are English, French and German, but papers are welcome on the history of teaching/learning any language. 

 Funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (Research Network project (2012-14) ‘Towards a History of Modern Foreign Language Teaching and Learning’) and supported by the Henry Sweet Society for the History of Linguistic Ideas, SIHFLES (Societé internationale pour l’histoire du français langue étrangère ou seconde), APHELLE (Associação Portuguesa para a História do Ensino das Línguas e Literaturas Estrangeiras), CIRSIL (Centro Interuniversitario di Ricerca sulla Storia degli Insegnamenti Linguistici), PHG (Peeter Heynsgenootschap) and SEHEL (Sociedad Española para la Historia de las Enseñanzas Linguísticas)

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 18.

 

Renaissance Society of America

Call for Papers

New York, NY, 27-29 March 2014

Early Modern Women Philosophers, Theologians, and Scientists

Organizers: Julie Campbell, Anne Larsen, and Diana Robin

 We would like to propose a series of panels on women’s participation in the areas of philosophy, theology, and science (natural philosophy) in the early modern period.

 As more information comes to light about women’s participation in philosophical debates, activities involving religion and religious controversy, and their engagement in natural philosophy during the early modern period, it becomes clear that we have much to learn about the women who incorporated such interests into their lives, and, in some cases, dedicated their lives to such pursuits, whether in convents or secular society.

 From the fifteenth to the seventeenth centuries, from Italian humanists such as Laura Cereta, Ippolita Sforza, and Cassandra Fedele, to the German reformer Katharina Schutz Zell, to French and Dutchsavantes such as Marie de Gournay and Anna Maria van Schurman, to French salonnières whose salons were in large part dedicated to politics, religion, and natural philosophy, such as the Vicomtesse d’Auchy, Mme de Loges, Mme de la Sablière, and Mme Deshoulières, to English women engaged in protestant or recusant causes, such as Mary Sidney’s work on the Psalms, Anne Vaughan Locke’s engagement in Calvinism, Gertrude More, Mary Ward, and Elizabeth Cary’s recusant writings, and Margaret Cavendish’s pursuit of natural philosophy, we can see how women were critically involved in these areas of interest.

 How were such women accepted or rejected in the contexts of their activities? What means of participation did they utilize—writing, conversation, oratory, experimentation?  Where do recipes and medical experimentation intersect? What other figures have work that has been “lost” and only recently recovered in these critical areas of early modern history? Where did natural philosophy and religion intersect for such women? What sorts of educations enabled such women to participate in these areas?

Please send abstracts of no more than 150 words and a one-page C.V. By Sat., June 1, 2013, by email attachment, to each of the following:

 Julie D. Campbell

Professor of English
Eastern Illinois University
jdcampbell@eiu.edu

  Diana Robin

Scholar-in-Residence, Newberry Library

Diana.robin@ren.com

 Anne R. Larsen

Professor of French
Hope College
alarsen@hope.edu

**************************************************************** 

 19.

 CALL FOR PAPERS

Women’s Writing About Beauty in Early Modern England

Renaissance Society of America, New York, March 27-29, 2014.

New York, NY, The New York Hilton

 Female beauty—often codified as fair skin, rosy cheeks, red lips, and blonde hair—is the frequent subject of literature in the sixteenth- and seventeenth- century England.  Critics have explored how male writers used beauty’s signs to articulate poetic identity, male subjectivity, dominance, competition, fear, desire, and political ambition, amongst other things.  Much less has been said about women’s writing about beauty, although English women also wrote about appearance in poetry, fiction, and drama, in letters, prayers,  meditations, advice, and life-writing and recorded its practices in account books and recipe collections.

 This panel will explore the complexities of how women contemplated, used, rejected, or revised early modern beauty ideals and practices. Proposals are invited for 20-minute papers that explore how women writing in England between 1550 and 1650 responded to some aspect of early modern beauty culture. Papers might consider, but are not limited to, issues around race, colonialism, class, politics, religion, material culture, aging, ugliness, marks, health, disguise, sexuality, literary history, knowledge, or social relationships.

 Please send a 150-word abstract, the paper’s title, and a CV of not more than 300 words to Edith Snook (esnook@unb.ca) by 22 May 2013.

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 20.

‘The World is Our House’: the seventeenth-century Hereford Cwm Jesuit Library in an international context, Friday 21 June 2013, Hereford Cathedral

A Midsummer symposium on international Jesuit culture, 1540–1700, with an evening concert of early Jesuit music, to celebrate the re-evaluation of the Cwm Jesuit Library, housed at Hereford Cathedral since 1679.  The library, the largest surviving seventeenth-century Jesuit missionary library in Britain, is currently being analysed in depth as part of an exciting joint project between Swansea University and Hereford Cathedral, funded by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). The study day will place the library within its larger international context by exploring the rich and fascinating world of seventeenth-century Jesuit culture.

The symposium and concert have been made possible thanks to generous sponsorship from the Jesuit Institute in London, the British Province of the Society of Jesus, and a donor who wishes to remain anonymous.

 10.00 – Registration and coffee in College Hall, Hereford Cathedral, HR1 2NG

 10.30 – Welcome and setting the context

             Canon Chris Pullin, Chancellor, Hereford Cathedral

             Professor Maurice Whitehead, Swansea University

 Panel One: Jesuit Arts, Science and Music in the early modern period

             10.45 – The Jesuits and the Arts, 1540–1700

                         Professor Peter Davidson, University of Aberdeen

            11.15 – The Jesuits and Science, 1540–1700

                         Dr Adam Mosley, Swansea University

             11.45 – The Jesuits and Music, 1540–1750

                         Dr Peter Leech, Swansea University

             12.15 – Questions and Discussion

  12.30–14.00 –  Buffet Lunch, with time to view the exhibitions of early Jesuit books and music, and sacred treasures from the Special Collections at Stonyhurst College, Lancashire, as well as the Hereford Mappa Mundi and the Chained Library exhibition. 

 Panel Two: The Jesuits in late-sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England and Wales

              14.00 – The Jesuits in England and Wales, 1580–1700: an overview

Reverend Dr Thomas McCoog, SJ, Fordham University, New York,                                                  and Archivist of the British Province of the Society of Jesus, London

             14.30 – Helen Wintour and Jesuit vestment-making in seventeenth-century

                          Worcestershire

                          Janet Graffius, Curator of Special Collections, Stonyhurst College

              15.00 – The Cwm Jesuit Library at Hereford Cathedral

                          Hannah Thomas, PhD candidate, Swansea University

              15.30 – Questions and Discussion

              16.00 – Closing comments

                          Canon Chris Pullin, Chancellor, Hereford Cathedral

                          Professor Maurice Whitehead, Swansea University

   16.15–17.15 – Exhibitions open

   17.30–18.15 – Opportunity to attend Choral Evensong in Hereford Cathedral, featuring      

                          unaccompanied seventeenth-century music

 19.30 – Concert

 For further information, please visit the conference web page worldisourhouse.blogspot.com

e-mail

library@herefordcathedral.org or call 01432 374225/6

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 21.

 The RSA Division in Hispanic Literature, the Cervantes Society of America, and/or the Society for Renaissance and Baroque Hispanic Poetry are jointly sponsoring panels on:

 Cervantes’s Library:

Critical readings by Cervantes; Cervantes as literary critic; Cervantine commentaries on literature.

Cervantes’s reactions to historical, legal, scientific, political or theological (i.e., non-fictional and non-poetic) writings are especially encouraged. Please send a single page with a 150-word abstract and brief CV by May 25, 2013 to both Laura Bass (laura_bass[at]brown.edu) and David A. Boruchoff (david.boruchoff[at]mcgill.ca).

 The Intellectual Mileux of Renaissance Spanish Artists:

Literary-artistic circles; artists and patrons; artists as writers and writers as artists; imagined or unrealized artistic projects. Please send a single page with a 150-word abstract and brief CV by May 25, 2013 to both Laura Bass (laura_bass[at]brown.edu) and David A. Boruchoff (david.boruchoff[at]mcgill.ca).

 Purloined Letters:

Plagiarism, false authorship, unauthorized publications, misleading or self-serving commentaries or translations. Please send a single page with a 150-word abstract and brief CV by May 25, 2013 to both Laura Bass (laura_bass[at]brown.edu) and David A. Boruchoff (david.boruchoff[at]mcgill.ca).

 Reimagining Time in the Early Modern Hispanic World:

In the wake of seismic events such as the encounter with America, religious wars, and acute political crisis, early modern Spain registered a pronounced awareness of historical change. In turn, traditional understandings of time as an ongoing continuum were challenged by an intensified sense of the material and cultural discontinuities that separate the present from the past. How did this new experience of the passage of time manifest itself in literature? What were its effects on mimesis, the tempus fugit topos, clock symbolism, visual imagery, representations of America, the practice of memory? Please send a single page with a 150-word abstract and brief CV by May 25, 2013 to all three of the following: Ariadna García-Bryce (garciab[at]reed.edu), Laura Bass (laura_bass[at]brown.edu) and David A. Boruchoff (david.boruchoff[at]mcgill.ca).

 Poetry and the City:

This forum explores poetry as a social practice that transcends the search for aristocratic status. We invite submissions that examine the multiple roles of poetry in city life; urban themes and imagery; or poetry and the bourgeoisie. Please send a single page with a 150-word abstract and brief CV by May 15, 2013 to both Ignacio Navarrete (ignacio[at]berkeley.edu) and Elizabeth Pettinaroli (pettinarolie[at]rhodes.edu).

Cervantes and Poetry:

On the fourth centenary of the publication of Cervantes’sViaje del Parnaso(1614), we invite submissions on poetry written by Cervantes or on the roles that poetry and poetics play in his works. Please send a single page with a 150-word abstract and brief CV by May 15, 2013 to all three of the following: David A. Boruchoff (david.boruchoff[at]mcgill.ca), Laura Bass (Laura_Bass[at]brown.edu), and Ignacio Navarrete (ignacio[at]berkeley.edu).

 Please note:

All proposals should bear in mind the interdisciplinary makeup of the Renaissance Society of America and the need to speak to scholars whose primary interests and expertise may lie beyond the Spanish-speaking world. Successful proposals will be published in the conference program.

The RSA permits participants to give only one paper at its annual meeting.

All presenters must be or become members of the RSA and register for the meeting.

Submission of a proposal implies that one will subsequently participate in the meeting if selected. The RSA is considering sanctions against those who withdraw after being selected or fail to attend the meeting. For more information on the annual meeting, see the RSA website: www.rsa.org.

 ****************************************************************

22.

 The Society for Early Modern Women [http://ssemw.org/] extends sponsorship for up to five sessions at the annual meeting of the Renaissance Society of America. Sponsorship signifies that sessions accepted by the SSEMW are automatically accepted for the RSA Annual Conference.

Session organizers whose panel focuses on women or female gender/sexuality in the Renaissance/Early Modern period – in all disciplines and in all geographic areas – are invited to submit an abstract describing the objective of their session, the names of speakers (with institutional affiliation), and the titles and draft abstracts of the papers to be read. Please make sure that all the information required by the RSA is provided when you submit your proposal [http://www.rsa.org/?page=2014NewYork]

Deadline for proposals: 25th May 2013 to smatth01@syr.edu

Emails regarding the award of SSEMW sponsorship for submitted sessions will be sent out one week before the RSA due date for proposals (11 June 2013).

The SSEMW does not require that people proposing sessions for sponsorship be members of the Society until their panel is accepted.

 *******************************************************

 23.

 We are delighted to welcome Peter Stallybrass (Walter H. and Leonore C. Annenberg Professor in the Humanities and Professor of English and of Comparative Literature and Literary Theory, University of Pennsylvania) to The Courtauld Institute of Art this summer as Research Forum Visiting Professor. His programme will be as follows:

 Tuesday, 14 May 2013

17.30 – 18.45, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

Lecture:Letter-writing and Painting 1500-1900

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

 Thursday, 16 May 2013

16.00 – 18.00, Research Forum South Room
Seminar:The Materiality of Reading and Writing: What Paintings Can Teach Us (If We Let Them)

Ticket/entry details: Open to postgraduate students and teaching staff

 Peter Stallybrass is Annenberg Professor in the Humanities and Professor of English and of Comparative Literature and Literary Theory at the University of Pennsylvania, where he directs the History of Material Texts. He is also a member of the American Philosophical Society and Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Editing Lives and Letters at the University of London. Peter began his career as a mortician, but he has been teaching since 1973, first in England at the University of Sussex, and, since 1988, at Penn. He has also taught in Paris at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales and at the Collège de France. Among his awards are the Andrew Lang Gold Medal from the University of St. Andrew’s, the James Russell Lowell Prize from the Modern Languages Association, and four teaching awards from Penn. His books include The Politics and Poetics of Transgression (1986) with Allon White, Renaissance Clothing and the Materials of Memory (2000) with Ann Rosalind Jones, and Benjamin Franklin, Writer and Printer (2006) with Jim Green. He has also collaborated with Jim Green in curating exhibitions on “Material Texts” at the Library Company of Philadelphia and on Benjamin Franklin and at the Grolier Club, and with Heather Wolfe on “Technologies of Writing in the Renaissance” at the Folger Shakespeare Library. Peter Stallybrass’ Rosenbach Lectures in Bibliography on “Printing for Manuscript” will be published next year by the University of Pennsylvania Press. He is at present working with Roger Chartier on a history of the book from wax tablets to e-books.

 Lecture: Letter-writing and Painting 1500-1900

 In this lecture, Peter Stallybrass will focus both on the material practices of letter-writing in Europe from 1500 to 1900 and on painted representations of the reading and writing of letters in this period. The lecture will include hand-outs of exact facsimiles of four letters (dated 1557, 1762, 1828, and c.1888) as an aid to examining continuities and transformations in letter-writing practices and to help understand how folding patterns and filing systems are represented in paintings.

Open to all, free admission.

Organised by Professor Caroline Arscott

 Seminar: The Materiality of Reading and Writing: What Paintings Can Teach Us (If We Let Them)

 In this seminar, Peter Stallybrass will look at what Renaissance paintings can teach us about the practices of reading and writing in early modern Europe. Among the topics that we will discuss are: the uses of erasable paper and notebooks by artists; bookmarking systems; and further considerations on letter-writing practices, following on from the lecture on Tuesday.

Open to postgraduate students and teaching staff.

Organised by Professor Caroline Arscott

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 24.

 The 3rd Forum on Early Modern Central Europe seminar of the year will take place on 9th May, at 5.15 pm.

Professor Martyn Rady (UCL-SSEES)

”The Hungarian Golden Bull of 1222: Composition, Content, Consequences’

Virginia Dillon (Somerville College, Oxford) ‘Religion, Violence and Ceremony in the Transylvanian News: Reporting in the German Language Newspapers from 1619-58′.

The venue is Room 431, UCL-SSEES, 16 Taviton Street, London WC1H 0BW.

As usual, there will be a small drinks reception after the seminar, and do let the convenors know if you are interested in joining the speakers for dinner.

****************************************************************** 

 25.

 We are organizing a panel for the 60th Annual RSA Meeting in New York Hilton
Midtown, 27–29 March 2014 entitled: The image of Elizabeth I in Early Modern
Spain. Here is the Call for Papers for anyone interested:

Queen Elizabeth I was a celebrated cult figure in 16th century England. In
Spain, however, her iconic presence was portrayed quite differently due to
the tense relations of the two countries. This strained and fearful
relationship between England and Spain began in 1584 with the prosecutions
of Catholics in England and the Spanish defeat of the “Invincible” Armada. A
limited Spanish corpus dedicated to this prominent political figure exists,
in which authors such as Miguel de Cervantes, Lope de Vega, Pedro de
Ribadeneira, Luis de Góngora, Antonio Coello or Bances Cándamo characterized
the Virgin Queen from contradictory perspectives and analyzed and imagined
her physical appearance, her private life, her personality and her rule.
This panel seeks to explore the fictionalized, historical and visual
representations of Elizabeth I and their impact on the Spanish collective
imagination. Please send 150 words abstracts in English by June 5, 2013 to
Eduardo Olid eolid@muhlenberg.edu <mailto:eolid@muhlenberg.edu> or Esther
Fernández efernandez@slc.edu <mailto:efernandez@slc.edu> .

 **********************************************************

25.

 University of York Centre for Renaissance & Early Modern Studies (CREMS) Summer Event Programme:

 WED 1 MAY 1.15-6.15PM

Women and the Popular in Early Modern England – CREMS Workshop

Speakers: Laura Gowing (London), Adrian Wilson (Leeds)                  

Venue: Treehouse, Berrick Saul

 THURS 9 MAY 5.30PM

Love, Anger and Envy: emotions and the early Reformation

Speaker: Lyndal Roper (Oxford)    

Venue: Bowland Auditorium, Berrick Saul

 FRI 10 MAY 9.45-12.15PM

Postgraduate Seminar: Carlstadt’s Wagon: visual propaganda for the Reformation  

Speakers: Lyndal Roper (Oxford), Jenny Spinks (Manchester)   

Venue: Treehouse

 WED 15 MAY 4.30PM

Capuchin Model of Leadership: the Pére Ange (Henri de Joyeuse) 1563-1608

Speaker: Peter Goddard (Univ of Guelph)                         

Venue: BS/008, Berrick Saul

 MON 20 MAY 4.30PM

Understanding Baroque Ivory Sculptures: the collection at the V& A

Speaker: Marjorie Trusted (Senior Curator of Sculpture V&A) HoA    

Venue: Bowland Auditorium

FRI 14 JUN 9-5.30PM

Cabinet of Curiosities – Postgraduate Symposium

Email: curiositycabinet2010@gmail.com                             

Venue: BS/008, Berrick Saul

 MON 3 JUN 4.15PM

Postgraduate Workshop: Literature, Politics and Religion in the Dutch Republic: ‘True Freedom’ and an Anglo-Dutch perspective 

With Nigel Smith (Princeton)

Venue: BS/008

 TUES 4 JUN 5.30PM

The European Marvel – Annual Patrides Lecture

Speaker: Nigel Smith (Princeton)                                       

Venue: Bowland Auditorium, Berrick Saul

WED 19 JUN 4.30PM

The Fate of the Book

Speaker: Eric Rasmussen (Univ of Nevada)                            

Venue: BS/008, Berrick Saul

 MON 22 APR 4.30PM

The Reader’s Eye: between annotation and illustration

Speaker: Bill Sherman (York)

Venue: Bowland Auditorium, Berrick Saul

 21-22 JUN 9-7PM

Sensing the Sacred: Religion and the Senses 1300-1800        

2-Day Conference, details on the web: york.ac.uk/crems/events/         

Venue: HRC, Berrick Saul

WED 29 MAY 9.30-5.30PM

Poetics and Prose Theory in Early Modern English – Thomas Browne Seminar

Speakers: Gavin Alexander (Cambridge), Jennifer Richards (Newcastle)   

Venue: Treehouse, Berrick Saul

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 27.

 A one day interdisciplinary colloquium on early modern approaches to the imagination is to be held at the University of Warwick on 17th July. Themes will include (among others) the imagination and dreams, the poetic imagination, imagination and trauma in literature, conversion and the imagination, the demonic imagination, the musical imagination, theological approaches to the imagination, and the imagination and health.

Further details, including how to register, can be found here: http://warwick.ac.uk/earlymodernimagination

 For more information, please contact Femke Molekamp: femke.molekamp@warwick.ac.uk

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 28.

 

The Renaissance at Birkbeck: Arts Week

All events at 43 Gordon Square

Wednesday 22 May

6.00pm-7.20

‘Remembering Myself: Memory and Identity in the Renaissance’

Panel with three speakers: Dr Adam Smyth, Dr Gillian Woods, Sue Wiseman.

Wednesday 22 May 7.40-9

‘Casta Paintings and the Colonial Body: Embodying Race in Spanish America’

Professor Rebecca Earle (Warwick)

Thursday 23 May 6.00pm

‘Mute Poetry, Speaking Pictures: A Book and Some Afterthoughts’

Professor Leonard Barkan (Princeton)

Peltz Room.

All welcome

 

Newsletter 38

By Alexander Samson, on 3 May 2013

1. University of Liverpool UK/EU PhD studentship connected to the ‘Envisioning the IndianCity’ project. Deadline 20 May 2013.

2. CFP: International Society for the Study of Women of the Old Regime International Symposium, ‘Birth: discourses, practices and representations of childbirth
in the France of the Ancien Régime’. January 31 – February 1, 2014, Reid Hall, rue de Chevreuse, Paris.

3. CFP: Early Modern Women and the Visual Arts: Open Session. College Art Association, Chicago, February 12-15, 2014.

4. Dacre Lecture, Oxford 2013. ‘Renewing the “New” British History’, Tony Barnard. Friday 17 May at 5pm, Corpus ChristiCollege.

5. New resource: Letters of Bess of Hardwick, University of Glasgow.

6. Postdoctoral Fellowship, MPIWG/Victoria and AlbertMuseum. One postdoctoral fellowship for three months between January 1 and December 31, 2014.

7. Auditor registration open for ‘Reanimating Playbooks: Editing for Performance, Performance for Editing’ symposium. Shakespeare Institute, Stratford-upon-Avon, Friday 10 May, from 11am-5:30pm.

8. (a) CFP: The International Sidney Society invites abstracts for 2014 RSA

to be held 27-29 March in New York City ’Sidney Books and Sidney Letters’.

8. (b) CFP:  The International Sidney Society invites abstracts for 2014 RSA

to be held 27-29 March in New York City ‘Wrothian Networks’.

9. Call for Panels only: Early Modern Women. RSA seeks panels for sessions on any area of women’s engagement between 1400-1700. Renaissance Society of America, New York, March 27-29, 2014.

10. Two-day symposium, ‘The Lure of the ‘Other’: religious conversion and reversion in the early modern Mediterranean and beyond’. 4th-5th June 2013 at St Mary’s UniversityCollege, Twickenham, UK.

11. Conference: ‘The Hand in the Text: Renaissance Acts of Writing and Printerventions’, hosted by the Centre for Early Modern Studies, Aberdeen, Saturday 25th May 2013 at Sir Duncan Rice Library.

12. CFP: ‘The Thirteenth York Manuscripts Conference: Cathedral Libraries and Archives of Britain and Ireland’, 3-5 July 2014. Hosted by the Centre for Medieval Studies and the Centre for Renaissance and Early Modern Studies at the University of York.

13. Society for Renaissance Studies Annual Lecture 2013, Professor Anna Contadini, ‘”Cose Nuove Fantastiche e Bizzarre”: Art and Trade between the Middle East and Renaissance Italy’. Friday 3May, 5.30pm, The Warburg Institute.

14. Registration open for Translation and the Circulation of Knowledge in Early Modern Science. The Warburg Institute, Friday 28 June 2013.

________________________________________________________ 

1.

Dear all,

I wondered if I may ask for your assistance in circulating the following
advert, which is for a UK/EU PhD studentship connected to the
‘Envisioning the Indian City’ project, for which we have recently
acquired funding (http://eticproject.wordpress.com).

I’d particularly welcome applications from students wanting to work on
English and continental European encounters with, and representations
of, sixteenth and seventeenth century Goa. Applications that fit within
the wider remits of the larger project, which covers four Indian cities
(Goa, Kolkata, Pondicherry and Chandigarh) from the sixteenth century to
the present, are equally welcome.

If you have any suitable students in mind, do encourage them to apply.
And if it is possible for you to circulate this more widely within your
institution, that would be much appreciated.

Further details of the studentship can be found at:
http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AGJ840/phd-studentship-in-envisioning-the-indian-city-spaces-of-encounter
The deadline is 20 May.

Many thanks,

Nandini

Professor Nandini Das
School of English
Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences
Cypress Building
Chatham Street
University of Liverpool
Liverpool
L69 7ZR

***********************************************************

2.

La SIEFAR a le plaisir de vous annoncer 

l’appel à communication de son prochain colloque International

Enfanter : discours, pratiques et représentations de l’accouchement dans la France d’Ancien Régime les propositions sont à envoyer avant le 30 juin 2013

 Organisation:
Société internationale pour l’étude des femmes de l’Ancien Régime (SIEFAR)

En partenariat avec :
– Université Columbia à Paris
– Reid Hall- Université de Liège
– FER ULg- Université de Nantes
– L’AMO

Dates : 31 janvier – 1er février 2014

Lieu : Paris, Reid Hall, rue de Chevreuse, 75006 Paris

Comité organisateur
· Laetitia Dion (U. Lyon 2/Siefar)
· Adeline Gargam (U. Brest/Siefar)
· Nathalie Grande (U. Nantes/Siefar)
· Marie-Elisabeth Henneau (U. Liège/Siefar)

Les propositions sont à envoyer pour le 30 juin 2013 aux quatre adresses suivantes :
· laetitiadion@free.fr
· a_gargam@yahoo.fr
· nathalie.grande@univ-nantes.fr
· mehenneau@ulg.ac.be 

Appel à communication

L’accouchement fut, pendant de nombreux siècles, un art du ressort des femmes. Du Moyen Âge jusqu’au Grand Siècle, les femmes ont exercé leur monopole sur la pratique des accouchements en ville comme à la campagne. Mais dès le XVIIe siècle, la médicalisation de la science obstétricale a opéré un bouleversement des rôles et induit, à la fin du XVIIIe siècle, une inversion faisant de ce territoire gynocentré un territoire désormais androcentré. Cette histoire de la mise au monde passionne depuis plusieurs décennies des historiens, comme Mireille Laget (Naissances : l’accouchement avant l’âge de la clinique, Paris, Le Seuil, 1982) et Jacques Gélis (L’arbre et le fruit, la naissance dans l’Occident moderne, XVIe-XIXe siècles, Paris, Fayard, 1984 ; La sage-femme ou le médecin, Paris, Fayard, 1988). Jusqu’à aujourd’hui, cette question de l’accouchement a principalement été envisagée d’un point de vue historique, anthropologique et sociologique, à travers les croyances, les rites, les pratiques, le vécu, la souffrance, ainsi qu’à travers les mutations survenues dans l’Europe moderne.
L’objectif de ce colloque est de traiter la question selon une nouvelle approche en envisageant l’accouchement du point de vue du « genre ». Il s’agit de déterminer s’il a existé en France une science obstétricale féminine et masculine et d’en définir les caractéristiques sexuées à la lumière des textes et de l’iconographie, notamment en explorant dans une perspective comparatiste les pratiques, les théories et les pédagogies mis en place par les sages-femmes, par les chirurgiens accoucheurs et par les autorités religieuses. Trois axes de réflexion peuvent être envisagés :
1. L’accouchement en tant qu’acte médical (perspective scientifique)
Il s’agit de confronter et de comparer les pratiques obstétricales des sages-femmes et des chirurgiens accoucheurs, d’en explorer les caractéristiques et les spécificités, d’en observer les éventuelles similitudes et différences pour chercher à déterminer s’il existait un art obstétrical typiquement féminin. À travers cette confrontation, on tentera de mettre en lumière l’apport des femmes à l’obstétrique. Dans cette perspective, on pourra s’intéresser aux :

a. Pratiques médicales de l’accouchement (rituels et gestes obstétricaux en usage, objets et instruments, préventions chirurgicales et sanitaires…)
b. Discours médicaux, traités et manuels d’obstétrique : les techniques et les pratiques médicales, l’instrumentation et la médecine de l’accouchement (pharmacopée en usage pour les maladies puerpérales).
c. Représentations littéraires et iconographiques de l’accouchement

2. La femme enceinte et la parturiente (perspective pédagogique)
On s’intéressera à la pédagogie de l’accouchement auprès de la femme enceinte et de la parturiente. On pourra confronter les pédagogies obstétricales et voir s’il existait, ou non, une pédagogie sexuellement différenciée à l’égard de la femme enceinte et de la parturiente.

a. Pédagogie destinée aux femmes enceintes en vue de la préparation à l’accouchement.
- Manuels et traités sur l’art des accouchements : typologie, contenu, destinataires …
- Méthodes, matériels et supports pédagogiques
b. Discours religieux à propos de et destinés aux femmes enceintes et accouchées
c. Représentations littéraires et iconographiques de la femme enceinte et de l’accouchée
3. Les maîtresses de l’art (perspective polémique)
Il s’agit de présenter quelques parcours exemplaires de l’art d’être sages-femmes, de leur formation et de leur « carrière », de leur difficile co-existence avec les représentants masculins de la science, d’interroger les discours qui leur sont adressés par les autorités (de la société, de la science ou de la religion) et les représentations diverses qu’elles ont pu susciter.

a. Représentations des maîtresses de l’art
- à travers les trajectoires de praticiennes méconnues ou laissées pour compte – sages-femmes de charité, sages-femmes libérales ou pensionnées et sages-femmes de prison – qui ont pratiqué l’accouchement en milieu urbain, campagnard et carcéral.
- à travers les représentations littéraires et iconographiques
b. Débats à propos du partage de la science obstétricale : les conflits d’intérêts entre médecins, chirurgiens et sages-femmes
c. Discours religieux (catholiques et protestants) destinés aux sages-femmes (avortement et contraception, baptême sous condition…).

Appel également en ligne sur le site de la SIEFAR

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3.

CFP: Early Modern Women and the Visual Arts: Open Session

College Art Association, Chicago, February 12-15, 2014

Organizer: Andrea Pearson, American University, Washington, DC

Sponsor: The Society for the Study of Early Modern Women

The Society for the Study of Early Modern Women seeks papers for an open session that explores women’s engagement with the visual arts between 1400 and 1700. All subjects and approaches are welcome, including, for example, women’s contributions to art-making and art patronage, the deployment of the arts for social intervention and change, the gendering of pictorial representation and artistic practices, and the use and manipulation of architectural space.

Please send a one- to two-page double-spaced abstract and a two-page c.v. by June 1, 2013, to Andrea Pearson at pearson@american.edu. Notification by June 7.

Andrea Pearson

AmericanUniversity

Washington, DC20016

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4.

DACRE LECTURE, OXFORD 2013

‘RENEWING THE “NEW” BRITISH HISTORY’

TOBY BARNARD

FRIDAY 17 MAY at 5 P.M.                                             CORPUS CHRISTICOLLEGE

All who attend the lecture are invited to a reception in Corpus after it.

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5. 

Subject: New resource: Letters of Bess of Hardwick

I have just seen the announcement today that a new resource developed by the University of Glasgow is now live. The site below has digitised the complete correspondence of Bess of Hardwick 1550-1608. 

www.bessofhardwick.org 

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6.

POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIP MPIWG/VICTORIA & ALBERT MUSEUM

The Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Berlin  (Max Planck Research Group Art and Knowledge in Pre-Modern Europe; Director: Prof. Dr. Sven Dupré) in collaboration with the Victoria and Albert Museum (contact: Dr. Marta Ajmar, Head of Postgraduate Programme, V&A/RCA History of Design, Victoria and Albert Museum, London) announces one postdoctoral fellowship for three months between January 1 and December 31, 2014.
 
The tenure of the fellowship is to be divided between the two institutes: the first and third months will be spent at the MPIWG, the second month at the V&A. The fellow will be offered research facilities at both institutions.
 
Outstanding junior and senior scholars (including those on sabbatical leave from their home institutions) are invited to apply. Candidates should hold a doctorate in the history of science and technology, the history of art and art technology or a related field (junior scholars should have a dissertation topic relevant to the history of science) at the time of application and show evidence of scholarly promise in the form of publications and other achievements.
 
Research proposals should address the history of knowledge and art up to the eighteenth century (with a preference for the period between 1350 and 1750), and may concern any geographical area within Europe, and any object of the visual and decorative arts. Projects related to on going projects at the Max Planck Research Group Art and Knowledge in Pre-Modern Europe will receive preference. The proposal should make clear how the project would benefit from the resources and contribute to the research culture of the Victoria and Albert Museum. Visiting fellows are expected to take part in the scientific life of the Institute, to advance their own research project, and to actively contribute to the relevant project of the Max Planck Research Group Art and Knowledge in Pre-Modern Europe.
 
The Max Planck Institute for the History of Science is an international and interdisciplinary research institute (http://www.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/en/index.html). The colloquium language is English; it is expected that candidates will be able to present their own work and discuss that of others fluently in that language. Fellowships are endowed with a monthly stipend between 2.100 € and 2.500 € (fellows from abroad) or between 1.468 € and 1.621 € (fellows from Germany), whereas senior scholars receive an honorary commensurate with experience. The Max Planck Institute for the History of Science covers the round trip travel costs from the fellow’s home institution and a round trip Berlin-London.
 
The Victoria and Albert Museum is the United Kingdom’s national museum of art, craft and design. It offers an encyclopaedic resource in its collections of the visual arts from Europe and Asia, of both historical and contemporary importance, and is a powerhouse of skills and expertise. Research relating to the arts and humanities takes place across the institution and is expressed in the form of gallery development, temporary exhibitions, books which range from the popular to the highly academic, journal articles, website material, conferences and colloquia. It supports collections-based research in all areas of art and design, ensuring that exhibition, publication and gallery projects are enhanced by the most relevant and up-to-date scholarship and benefit from appropriate academic partnerships and funding opportunities. The V&A houses the National Art Library, a major public reference library for art and design. Further outstanding expertise and resources relevant to the joint fellowship can be found in the V&A’s curatorial collections and Conservation department.  In close scholarly proximity to the V&A are other key ‘Albertopolis’ institutions dedicated to science, technology, art and design – the Science Museum, the Natural History Museum, Imperial College and the Royal College of Art.

Many research projects are located in the Research department, which supports a wide number of exhibition research teams, a further group of scholars and the V&A/RCA Postgraduate Programme in the History of Design. It produces a number of publications and web-based outputs (Online Journal, Research Report, Research Bulletins) and oversees seminars and workshops to support the development of staff research and subject expertise. The Visiting Fellow will be based in the Research department and be expected to participate to the vibrant research culture of the department and the V&A/RCA History of Design community. S/he will be expected to contribute a research seminar during the period of the fellowship.
 
Candidates of all nationalities are encouraged to apply; applications from women are especially welcome. The Max Planck Society is committed to promoting handicapped individuals and encourages them to apply.
 
Candidates are requested to submit a curriculum vitae (including list of publications), a research proposal on a topic related to the project (750 words maximum), one sample of writing (i.e. article or book chapter), and names and addresses of two referees (including email) who have already been contacted by the applicant to assure their willingness to submit letters of recommendation if requested, to:
 
Max-Planck-Institut für Wissenschaftsgeschichte Max Planck Research Group Dupré – postdoc fellowship Boltzmannstr. 2214195 Berlin Germany (Electronic submission is also possible: officedupre@mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de) by June 30, 2013. Successful candidates will be notified before July 31.
 
For questions concerning the Max Planck Research Group on Art and Knowledge in Pre-Modern Europe, please see http://www.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/en/research/projects/MRGdupre or contact Sven Dupré (mailto:officedupre@mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de); for administrative questions concerning the position and the Institute, please contact Claudia Paaß (paass@mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de), Head of Administration, or Jochen Schneider (jsr@mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de), Research Coordinator.
 
For enquiries concerning the Victoria and Albert Museum’s component of the fellowship, please contact Dr. Marta Ajmar, Head of Postgraduate Programme, V&A/RCA History of Design, Victoria and Albert Museum (m.ajmar@vam.ac.uk).
 
For more information about the V&A and its resources, visit the website (http://www.vam.ac.uk/; http://www.vam.ac.uk/page/n/national-art-library/; http://collections.vam.ac.uk/; http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/c/conservation-department/; http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/r/research-department/; http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/m/ma-history-of-design/).

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7.

Reanimating Playbooks symposium – auditor registration

Auditor registration for Reanimating Playbooks: Editing for Performance, Performance for Editing is now open!

This one-day symposium convenes at the Shakespeare Institute, Stratford-upon-Avon, on Friday 10 May, from 11am-5:30pm.

Plenary speakers include John Jowett (Shakespeare Institute), Marion O’Connor (Kent), and Barbara Ravelhofer (Durham).

The day will also include papers from Brett D. Hirsch (Western Australia), Joanna Howe (Bath Spa), Stephen Purcell (Warwick), and Pip Willcox (Bodleian Libraries, Oxford), as well as practical workshops led by José Pérez Díez (Shakespeare Institute), Cassie Ash (Shakespeare Institute), and Yasmin Arshad (UCL) – featuring cast members from her recent production of Samuel Daniel’s The Tragedie of Cleopatra.

Auditors may register for £5, lunch and refreshments are included: http://shop.bham.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&prodid=667&deptid=30&catid=61

Questions may be addressed directly to José Pérez Díez (jap942@bham.ac.uk<mailto:jap942@bham.ac.uk>), and you can find more information on the Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/ReanimatingPlaybooks). We hope to see some of you on the 10th!

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8. a)

The International Sidney Society invites abstracts for 2014 RSA

to be held 27-29 March in New York City  

‘Sidney Books and Sidney Letters’

The Correspondence of Sir Philip Sidney, The Sidney Library Catalogue, and The Correspondence of Rowland Whyte will be published in 2012/ 2013.  The International Sidney Society invites abstracts for RSA 2014 in New York that consider these primary sources, as well as the previously-published editions of Sidney family letters (including The Correspondence of Dorothy Percy Sidney and Domestic Politics and Family Absence).

  • What do these newly edited documents tell us about the  Sidneys?
  • How might we read them as texts in themselves?
  • How might we  put them in dialogue with family members’ writing in other literary genres?
  • How might we utilize them for more general literary and historical research?

Please send a 150-word abstract, a list of keywords, and a one-page cv to us by 15 May 2013 for distribution to the Sidney Program Committee.

Email attachments in Microsoft Word are preferred. 

jblack@english.umass.edu, hannay@siena.edu

Joseph Black, Chair of session

Margaret Hannay, Secretary

International Sidney Society

 

8. b)

 The International Sidney Society invites abstracts for 2014 RSA

to be held 27-29 March in New York City 

‘Wrothian Networks’

What might be gained from considering the life or writing of Lady Mary Wroth with an eye to networks? How might such an emphasis revise our understanding of how literary texts interact, or how they work, or of Wroth’s literary output? The International Sidney Society invites abstracts for RSA 2014 in New York that explore the idea of the network in the life and/or letters of Lady Mary Wroth. We encourage the broadest possible interpretation of “network,” so projects might address questions such as (but of course not limited to):

  • ·      What personal and/or literary networks did Wroth’s writing address? Howso?
  • ·      What are the useful tensions between “networks” and “influence” when considering Wroth’s relationship to other writers?
  • ·      Where and how do “networks” supplant a “canon” when considering the place of Wroth’s writing?
  • ·      How do networked media affect our reception or teaching of Wroth? Or, how might they?
  • ·      In what kinds transhistorical networks does Wroth’s writing participate?

We invite proposals for a wide range of possible 20-minute presentations, from familiar historicist scholarship to presentist or even personal reflections, discussions of teaching, provocations toward larger digital humanities projects, or what you will. Given the decentralized nature of networks, proposals that include but do not exclusively consider Wroth are more than welcome.

Please send a 150-word abstract, a list of keywords, and a one-page cv to us by 15 May 2013 for distribution to the Sidney Program Committee.

Email attachments in Microsoft Word are preferred.

strychar@fiu.edu, hannay@siena.edu

Andrew Strycharski, Chair of session, Vice President

Margaret Hannay, Secretary

International Sidney Society

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9.

Revised RSA 2014, Call for Panels–Early Modern Women
Forwarding revised call for panels:
 
Call for Panels only: Early Modern Women

Renaissance Society of America, New York, March 27-29, 2014.
New York, NY, The New York Hilton.

RSA seeks panels for sessions on any area of women’s engagement between 1400-1700. Submissions for panels in all fields concerning women and gender are welcome, including: science, medicine, religion, music, art, theater, architecture, literature, patronage, politics, the publishing industry, and entrepreneurship in any field. Panels on women’s intervention and leadership in new venues and arenas are especially sought.

Please send proposals for panels and brief cvs for all panel participants by June 1, 2013 to diana.robin@rcn.com. Each panel proposal should have a title, a chair, and three presenters each with an abstract of no more than 150 words. A commenter is optional.

Organizer: Diana Robin, Discipline Representative for Women and Gender, RSA

Sponsor: The Renaissance Society of America

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10.

Symposium on conversion in the early modern Mediterranean 

The Lure of the ‘Other’: religious conversion and reversion in the early modern Mediterranean and beyond.

A two-day symposium on conversion in the early-modern Mediterranean world will be held on 4th-5th June 2013 at St Mary’s UniversityCollege, Twickenham, UK  

To register, and for more details including the programme please see our website

http://www.smuc.ac.uk/religious-conversion/

or contact claire.norton@smuc.ac.uk

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11.

Early Modern Studies in Scotland Seminar

The Hand in the Text: Renaissance Acts of Writing and Printerventions

A one-day symposium exploring the agency of the hand in textual transmission

Hosted by Centre for Early Modern Studies, Aberdeen

Saturday 25th May 2013

at

Sir Duncan Rice Library

12.30-1: Tea, Coffee & Welcome

1 – 2.45: Scribes and Scripts

Sebastiaan Verweij (Oxford), In Praise of Scottish Scribes

Steve W. May (Emory/Sheffield), Matching Hands in English Renaissance Manuscripts: A Case Study

Jonathan Gibson (Open University), Varieties of Italic

2.45-3.15: Tea and Coffee

3.15 – 4.30: Re-descriptions: the hand in the printed text.

Katherine Acheson (Waterloo), Writing in Bibles: The Example of Folger 2190 (1603)

Fred Schurink (Northumbria), Re-Reading Tudor Translation from the Margin: Gabriel Harvey’s Annotations to Richard Morison’s Stratagems (1539)

For further information please contact the organiser Andrew Gordon: a.gordon@abdn.ac.uk

Dr Andrew Gordon

Co-Director, Centre for Early  Modern Studies

School of Language  & Literature

TaylorBuilding

University of Aberdeen

Aberdeen AB24 3UB

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12.

 Call for Papers

The Thirteenth York Manuscripts Conference: Cathedral Libraries and Archives of Britain and Ireland

3-5 July 2014

Hosted by the Centre for Medieval Studies and the Centre for Renaissance and Early Modern Studies at the University of York

Organised by Brian Cummings, Linne Mooney, Bill Sherman and Hanna Vorholt.

The York Manuscripts Conference has been held biennially or triennially since 1986 and, with about 50 papers, is amongst the largest conferences in Europe dedicated to manuscript studies. The Thirteenth York Manuscripts Conference, to be held from 3-5 July 2014 will have as its topic the Cathedral Libraries and Archives of England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland.

The Cathedral Libraries and Archives of Britain and Ireland comprise some of the most remarkable and least explored collections of medieval and early modern manuscripts. While predictably focused on theological, liturgical, and devotional books, they also contain many medical, scientific, and literary sources, as well as legal and administrative documents. In addition to the many collections that are still in situ, others are now being looked after elsewhere, or have been dispersed. The conference will include papers on medieval and early modern manuscripts which are or were once held by the cathedrals of Britian and Ireland, considering their varied contents, illumination, use, and provenance; paper topics might also explore the formation, development, and dissolution of the libraries themselves; connections between different collections; their location and cataloguing within the cathedrals; or the distinction between cathedral libraries and cathedral archives in a historical perspective. Papers which shed light on lesser known treasures and collections will be especially welcome. We invite papers from researchers in the fields of religion, history, art history, musicology, history of science, literature, codicology, conservation, and other cognate disciplines. Papers delivered at the conference may be considered for inclusion in a volume of selected essays.

The conference is organised in association with the Cathedrals Libraries and Archives Network (CLAN), which seeks to engender, co-ordinate, facilitate and promote research on the Cathedral collections, and to act as an interface between academic communities, church bodies, and the wider public.

Plenary lectures will be given by Nigel Morgan (Cambridge), Christopher Norton (York), Rodney Thomson (Tasmania), and Magnus Williamson (Newcastle).

Please send an abstract of no more than 300 words to YMC-2014@york.ac.uk. Deadline for submission of proposals is 1 July 2013.

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13.

ANNUAL LECTURE 2013

THE WARBURG INSTITUTE, FRIDAY 3RD MAY 5:30 PM

PROFESSOR ANNA CONTADINI

(PROFESSOR OF THE HISTORY OF ISLAMIC ART)

(SOAS)

‘“ *Cose Nuove Fantastiche e Bizzarre*: Art and

Trade between the MiddleEast and Renaissance

Italy.

A WINE RECEPTION WILL BE HELD IN THE COMMON

ROOM AFTERWARDS. ALL WELCOME.

SOCIETY FOR RENAISSANCE STUDIES 2013

HTTP://WWW.RENSOC.ORG.UK/

TWITTER @SRSRENSOC

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14.

 

Translation and the Circulation of Knowledge in Early Modern Science

The Warburg Institute, Friday 28 June 2013

Organised by Sietske Fransen (Warburg Institute) and Niall Hodson (DurhamUniversity)

With financial support from the Society for Renaissance Studies and DurhamUniversity

Keynote speaker: Sven Dupré (Berlin)

Speakers: Felicity Henderson (Royal Society), Charles van den Heuvel (The Hague), Niall Hodson (Durham), Ana Carolina Hosne (Heidelberg), Jan van de Kamp (Amsterdam), Margaret O. Meredith (Maastricht), José Maria Pérez Fernandez (Granada),

Iolanda Plescia (Rome) and Fabien Simon (Paris)

In recent decades, scholars have offered myriad new insights into the exchange and propagation of scientific ideas in the early modern Republic of Letters. Within this vibrant field, however, the part played by translation and translators remains little studied. This colloquium will explore the role of translation in early modern science, providing a forum for discussion about translations as well as the translators, mediators, agents, and interpreters whose role in the intellectual history of the period remains ill defined and deserves greater attention. 

Registration £25 (£12.50 for concessions)

Bursaries Available for Student Attendance

Programme and more information: http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/events/colloquia/translation

Woburn Square, LondonWC1H 0AB

warburg.sas.ac.uk

 

 

Newsletter 37

By Alexander Samson, on 22 April 2013

  1. Poetics and Prose theory in Early Modern English – York CREMS, 29 May 2013, Treehouse, Humanities Research Centre, University of York, 9.30-5.30.
  2. The British Milton Seminar Autumn Meeting, 2013, Saturday 19 October.
  3. Summer School: “Court Residences as Places of Exchange in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe” (II), Madrid, 4-14 July 2013.
  4. Description of a proposed session at the RSA meeting March 27-29, 2014 in New York:  DID WOMEN ARTISTS HAVE A REFORMATION?
  5. Call for Panels. Society for the Study of Early Modern Women will be sponsoring five panels for next year’s RSA meeting, March 27-29, 2014 in New York.
  6. New York, NY, 27-29 March 2014, Early Modern Women Philosophers, Theologians, and Scientists. Organizers: Julie Campbell, Anne Larsen, and Diana Robin.

  7. One-day workshop – ‘Describing, Analysing and Identifying Early Modern Handwriting: Methods and Issues’, T. S. Eliot Lecture Theatre, Merton College, Thursday 25 April, 9.15-4. Organized by the Centre for Early Modern Studies and Merton College History of the Book Group, with the co-operation of the Bodleian Library Centre for the Study of the Book.
  8. Reading University, Early Modern Research Centre, ‘Academic Culture and the Culture of Academic Competitions in early Modern Europe’,  Friday 26 April 2013.
  9. Two Conferences at UCL: Medieval Francophone Literary Culture Outside France is a two-day academic international conference to be held at University College London, 6-7 June 2013 and The Italian Angevins: Naples and Beyond is a one-day interdisciplinary conference, 5th June, focusing on the culture, history, and politics of the Angevin Regno, from 1266 to 1422.
  10. Leonardo Da Vinci Society Annual Lecture, Alexander Marr, ‘Disingenuous Ingenuity in Renaissance Germany: The Case of Walter Hermann Ryff’, 10th May, 6pm, Kenneth Clark LT, Courtauld Institute, Somerset House.
  11. Details of the 2013 Summer term programme for the Research Seminars. (All seminars are free /open to all and taking place at The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, WC2R 0RN London) 
  12. Warburg Institute Events from April to June 2013. http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/mnemosyne/AnnualProgramme2012_13.pdf
  13. Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in English Literature University of Roehampton -Department of English and Creative Writing (1.0 FTE) HR Ref No: HR64/13. Salary: £36,630 to £48,008 pa inc
  14. Light, Colour, Veils – a conference to be held on 1st June at The Courtauld Institute of Art.
  15. Temporary Lecturer in English, 1500-1660 English, University of Southampton.

________________________________________________________

 1.

Poetics and Prose theory in Early Modern English – York CREMS

29 May 2013, Treehouse, Humanities Research Centre, University of York, 9.30-5.30

Open to all – entrance free and no registration required, but do email if you’re planning to attend.

10.00-10.45 Poetic Treatises in Early Modern England

  • Gavin Alexander (Cambridge), The Proportions of English Poetics

10.45-11.30

  • Hannah Leah Crummé (Kings College London) Theorizing English Rhetoric (Abraham Fraunce’s Arcadian Rhetorike and Fernando de Herrera)
  • Michael Hetherington (Cambridge),  Remembering Lysias: The Coherence of the Text in Early Modern England

Coffee 11.30-12.00

 12.00-1.15 From Theory to Poetic Practice

  • Hannah Crawforth (Kings College, London), Richard Willes’ Poetic Theory and Practice
  • Micha Lazarus (Oxford), Sidney and Vettori’s Aristotle
  • Louise Wilson (St Andrews), Theories of pleasure in early modern literary criticism

 Lunch, 1.15-2.15

 2.15-3.30

  • Elizabeth Scott-Baumann (Kings College, London), A pause for thought?: Critical writing by women and men 1610-1660
  • John Roe (York), ‘Besely seeking with a continuell chaunge’: the poetics of indeterminacy in Petrarch and Wyatt.

·         Katherine Acheson (University of Waterloo in Ontario), The “Way of Dichotomy”: Visual Rhetoric, Dichotomous Tables, and Paradise Lost

Coffee, 3.30-4.00

4.00-4.45 Prose Theory

  • Florence Hazrat (Cambridge), Poesy, Plot and Parenthesis: Rhetorical Figures as Structural and Narrative Strategy in Early Modern Prose Writing
  • Stuart Farley (St Andrews), The Extemporary Method in Early Modern English Prose

4.45-5.30

  • Jenny Richards (Newcastle), Appealing to ‘the Physical Ear’: Thomas Nashe on Prose Style

Contact: kevin.killeen@york.ac.uk

Part of the Sir Thomas Browne Seminar: http://www.york.ac.uk/english/news-events/browne/

York CREMS: http://www.york.ac.uk/crems/

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 2.

THE BRITISH MILTON SEMINAR

AUTUMN MEETING, 2013

Saturday 19 October 2013

Sign up for email alerts at:

http://britishmiltonseminar.wordpress.com/

CALL FOR PAPERS

Venue: The Birmingham and Midland Institute on 19 October 2013.  There will be two sessions, from 11.00 am to 12.30 pm, and from 2.00 pm to 4.00 pm.

We currently intend that each session will have two papers (of approx. 25-30 minutes each), for which proposals are invited.

Please send proposals to Professor Thomas N. Corns no later than 23 August 2013.

Thomas N. Corns

Joint Convener

email:els009@bangor.ac.uk<mailto:els009@bangor.ac.uk>

~

For further information about the British Milton Seminar, please contact either:

Professor Thomas N. Corns (els009@bangor.ac.uk<mailto:els009@bangor.ac.uk>), or Dr Hugh Adlington (h.c.adlington@bham.ac.uk<mailto:h.c.adlington@bham.ac.uk>).

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3.

Summer School: “Court Residences as Places of Exchange in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe” (II)

Location: Madrid, with field trips to various castles and residences in central Spain.

Date: 4-14 July 2013.

 Organisation: PALATIUM and the Fundación Carlos de Amberes, with the collaboration of Patrimonio Nacional and the Casa de Velázquez.

Supervisors: Bernardo J. García García (Fundación Carlos de Amberes), José Luis Sancho (Patrimonio Nacional), Vanessa de Cruz Medina (Fundación Carlos de Amberes).

Deadline 5 May 2013

Details here:http://www.courtresidences.eu/index.php/events/summer-school/summer-school-madrid-2013/

 This is the second PALATIUM Summer School. The first PALATIUM Summer School was held in Utrecht, July 2012.

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4.

Description of a proposed session at the RSA meeting March 27-29, 2014 in New York

 DID WOMEN ARTISTS HAVE A REFORMATION?

Scholars across disciplines have amply demonstrated the role of women in spiritual reform, as writers, patrons (of artworks and religious orders), and in devotional practices.  Art-historical inquiry has recently turned to the involvement of some canonical artists in reform movements: women artists, however, seem absent from this discussion, despite their production of altarpieces and devotional images, as well as their connections with ecclesiastics.

This session seeks to explore women artists’ engagement with religious issues.  Is this a promising line of inquiry?  Did women tackle specific theological matters in their art?  Do they express the thoughts of a patron or religious community?  Are they motivated, moreover, by personal sentiments?  Did they align themselves with any specific currents within the Reform?  Do we have evidence of women artists attempting a specifically gendered devotion?  Paper proposals that speak to these or similar issues are invited.

Please send a paper title; an abstract (150-word maximum); keywords; and a brief curriculum vitae (300-word maximum) to Sheila ffolliott  sffollio@gmu.edu  by the end of May 2013. 

Please circulate to others whom you might think interested.

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5.

The Society for the Study of Early Modern Women will be sponsoring five panels for next year’s RSA meeting, March 27-29, 2014 in New York.  Those interested in submitting a panel for consideration will need to send the following:  organizer’s contact information, panel title, panel description, panel participants & chair, abstracts for individual papers (150-word maximum) as well as single page curriculum vitae for each participant to Megan Matchinske, Vice President SSEMW (matchin@email.unc.edu).

Deadline May 10, 2013.

Please feel free to circulate this call too others whom you believe might be interested.

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6.

Renaissance Society of America

Call for Papers

New York, NY, 27-29 March 2014

Early Modern Women Philosophers, Theologians, and Scientists

Organizers: Julie Campbell, Anne Larsen, and Diana Robin

 We would like to propose a series of panels on women’s participation in the areas of philosophy, theology, and science (natural philosophy) in the early modern period.

As more information comes to light about women’s participation in philosophical debates, activities involving religion and religious controversy, and their engagement in natural philosophy during the early modern period, it becomes clear that we have much to learn about the women who incorporated such interests into their lives, and, in some cases, dedicated their lives to such pursuits, whether in convents or secular society.

 From the fifteenth to the seventeenth centuries, from Italian humanists such as Laura Cereta, Ippolita Sforza, and Cassandra Fedele, to the German reformer Katharina Schutz Zell, to French and Dutch savantes such as Marie de Gournay and Anna Maria van Schurman, to French salonnières whose salons were in large part dedicated to politics, religion, and natural philosophy, such as the Vicomtesse d’Auchy, Mme de Loges, Mme de la Sablière, and Mme Deshoulières, to English women engaged in protestant or recusant causes, such as Mary Sidney’s work on the Psalms, Anne Vaughan Locke’s engagement in Calvinism, Gertrude More, Mary Ward, and Elizabeth Cary’s recusant writings, and Margaret Cavendish’s pursuit of natural philosophy, we can see how women were critically involved in these areas of interest.

 How were such women accepted or rejected in the contexts of their activities? What means of participation did they utilize—writing, conversation, oratory, experimentation?  Where do recipes and medical experimentation intersect? What other figures have work that has been “lost” and only recently recovered in these critical areas of early modern history? Where did natural philosophy and religion intersect for such women? What sorts of educations enabled such women to participate in these areas?

Please send abstracts of no more than 150 words and a one-page C.V. by Monday 6 May, by email attachment, to each of the following:

Julie D. Campbell                                                        Diana Robin

Professor of English                                                    Scholar-in-Residence, Newberry Library

Eastern Illinois University                                          Diana.robin@rcn.com

jdcampbell@eiu.edu

 Anne R. Larsen

Professor of French

Hope College

alarsen@hope.edu

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7.

Describing, Analysing and Identifying Early Modern Handwriting: Methods and Issues

T. S. Eliot Lecture Theatre, Merton College, Thursday 25 April, 9.15-4. Organized by the Centre for Early Modern Studies and Merton College History of the Book Group, with the co-operation of the Bodleian Library Centre for the Study of the Book.

This one-day workshop will bring together leading early modern scholars, palaeographers and digital humanities experts from the UK, the USA, France and Italy to discuss current scholarly approaches to the description of early modern English handwriting and to explore the potential for the use of digital technologies in future collaborative work.

Although the past twenty years have seen a rapid growth in scholarship on early modern English manuscripts, the study of handwriting in the period still seems to be in its infancy. Methods of describing, distinguishing and identifying hands differ from scholar to scholar and, although the work of individual early modernists is often based on very substantial unarticulated ‘tacit knowledge’ about the dating and differentiation of script styles, little detailed work on the topic has been published. Most of the scholarship in the area focuses, in an ad hoc way, on high-status manuscripts and on the identification of hands associated with major figures. The workshop will explore the potential for future collaboration on more comprehensive and systematic ways of understanding the variation between different hands in the period. and specifically the possibilities for a new project which will aim to produce substantial publicly-available material mapping key elements in the development of English handwriting between 1500 and 1700.

There will be four sessions. Speakers in the first session will describe some of the challenges currently facing scholars working on early modern English handwriting. New ways of addressing these challenges will be described by the speakers in the second session, all of whom are involved in research applying digital technologies to palaeography. In the final formal session, a distinguished panel will discuss specific samples of early modern handwriting. Following the main sessions there will be a planning meeting to discuss potential funding bids, which will be open to any interested parties.

Registration here
Cost: £20, graduates £15

Draft Programme – subject to revision

9.15-9.30 Registration

9.30 Welcome
David Norbrook (CEMS), Julia Walworth (Librarian, Merton College)

9.35-10.45 Problems
Chair: Colin Burrow (Oxford)

Early Modern Handwriting in Theory and Practice
Jonathan Gibson (Open University)

From Hands to Heads: Chasing Elizabeth I’s Scribes
Carlo M. Bajetta (Aosta)

English or French hands? The Case of Queen Elizabeth I’s Letters in French
Guillaume Coatalen (Cergy-Pontoise)

10.45-11.00 Tea and coffee

11.00-12.30 Solutions
Chair: Daniel Wakelin (Oxford)

Forensic Handwriting Analysis
Tom Davis (Birmingham)

Digital Alphabets and Early Modern Hand Identification
Steven W. May (Sheffield)

Graphetic profiling and scribal identification
Simon Horobin (Oxford)

‘I saw it on CSI…’: Forming Digital Technology for Humanities Research
Julia Craig-McFeely (Oxford)

12.30-1.30 Lunch

1.30-2.45 Round Table
Chair: Gabriel Heaton (Sotheby’s)

Peter Beal (Institute of English Studies, London)
William Poole (Oxford)
Heather Wolfe (Folger Shakespeare Library)
Henry Woudhuysen (Oxford)

2.45-3.00 Tea and coffee

3.00-4.00 Open project planning meeting
Chair: Giles Bergel (Oxford)

The workshop has been timed so that delegates can also attend one of Professor Richard Beadle’s Lyell Lectures, ‘Medieval English Literary Autographs 1: Fugitive Pieces’, in the same venue at 5pm.

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8.

Early Modern Research Centre

Academic Culture and the Culture of Academic Competitions in early Modern Europe

Friday 26 April 2013

10.30-10.45 Coffee & Registration

10.45-12.45 Session 1 (Chair: Dr Esther Mijers, University of Reading)

Dr Arjan van Dixhoorn (University of Ghent), ‘Towards a Cultural History of Literary Contest: the Case of the early Modern Low Countries’

Dr Lisa Sampson (University of Reading), ‘Amateurs Meet Professionals: Theatrical Activities in the Italian Academies’

Dr Hannah Williams (University of Oxford), ‘Le Brun vs Mignard / Academy vs Guild’

12.45-14.00 Lunch

14.00-15.30 Session 2 (Chair: Professor Joel Felix, University of Reading)

Dr Jeremy Caradonna (University of Alberta), ‘Counter-Enlightenment Reconsidered: The Example of Academic Prize Contests in Eighteenth-Century France’

Professor Allan Potofsky (University of Paris-Diderot), ‘How Revolutionary Were the French

Revolution’s Urban Planning Concours?’

15.30-16.00 Tea

16.00-17.00 Presentations

Dr Mark Curran (Queen Mary College), ‘The Republic of Books: Prizes, Protestant Enlightenment and Publishing in pre-Revolutionary Europe’

Dr Simone Testa (Royal Holloway), ‘The Italian Academies and their networks: collaboration or confrontation?’

17.00-17.45 Round Table & Closing comments

Professor Laurence Brockliss (University of Oxford)

 For the booking form go to: http://www.reading.ac.uk/web/FILES/EMRC/Academic_Culture_Booking_Form.pdf

Or contact Jan Cox: j.f.cox@reading.ac.uk

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9.

Two Conferences at UCL:

Medieval Francophone Literary Culture Outside France is a two-day academic international conference to be held at University College London, 6-7 June 2013. In nine sessions, we will address the research questions set by the AHRC-funded MFLCOF-project, thus investigating how francophone literary texts travelled across Europe (the Low Countries, the British Isles, the Mediterranean) and beyond (the Crusader Kingdoms in the Holy Land). Particular focus will be on the period between the twelfth and the fifteenth century. Keynote speakers are Dr. Frank Brandsma (Universiteit Utrecht) and Prof. Keith Busby (University of Wisconsin-Madison). Further information: http://www.medievalfrancophone.ac.uk/2013-conference/

Please register before 29 May d.schoenaers@ucl.ac.uk (conference fees: £15 student / lower waged; £35 waged)

The Italian Angevins: Naples and Beyond is a one-day interdisciplinary conference, focusing on the culture, history, and politics of the Angevin Regno, from 1266 to 1422. Complementing the 2013 Boccaccio Septcentenary, and immediately preceding this year’s Medieval Francophone Literary Culture Outside France conference, we anticipate that this event will stimulate much lively discussion among scholars of diverse disciplinary interests. The keynote address will be given by Marilynn Desmond (Cambridge University). Further information: http://italianangevins2013.wordpress.com/

Please register before 29 May e.cullen.11@ucl.ac.uk (attendance is free of charge)

Additionally, we would like to draw your attention to the final seminar in our 2012-2013 MFLCOF seminar series to be held 2 May (5.30 PM) at King’s College London  (Strand Campus, K2.29, Council Room). Prof. Remco Sleiderink (HUB,Brussels)  will be talking about ‘The Ring of Hope. Guillaume de Machaut’s Remède de Fortune and the reception of French literature in the Low Countries in the 2nd half of the 14th century’. This session is co-sponsored by CLAMS.

Best wishes

 Dirk Schoenaers

University College London

Medieval Francophone Literary Culture Outside France

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10.

 ANNUAL
LECTURE
2013
Friday
10 May 2013
6.00 pm
At the
Kenneth Clark
Lecture Theatre
Courtauld Institute of Art
Somerset House
The Strand, London
Admission is free
All are welcome

Dr Alexander Marr
(University of Cambridge)

The Leonardo da Vinci Society

Disingenuous Ingenuity in
Renaissance Germany: The Case of
Walther Hermann Ryff

Dr Marr will discuss Walther Ryff and the imago contrafacta in relation to
treatises on anatomy, medicine and the mechanical arts. Especially at issue
will be Ryff’s ‘disingenuous ingenuity’ in his pillaging and reworking of
others’ verbal and visual matter, with additional interest in his appropriation
of the legacy of Durer in 1540s Nuremberg.

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11.

Please find below details of the 2013 Summer term programme for the Research Seminars. (All seminars are free /open to all and taking place at The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, WC2R 0RN London)                                               

EARLY MODERN

Monday, 29 April – Katrin Seyler (Andrew W Mellon Foundation / Research Forum Postdoctoral Fellow -  Mellon MA): Making Knowledge in the Republic of Tools – the Mindscape of Early-Modern Journeyman Image-Makers. 6.00pm, Research Forum South Room

Joint MEDIEVAL /RENAISSANCE WORK-IN-PROGRESS

Wednesday, 24 April – Dr Stella Panayotova (Fitzwilliam Museum): Illuminated Manuscripts: Art and Science. 5.30pm, Research Forum South Room

RENAISSANCE

Wednesday, 15 May – Geoff Nuttall (The Courtauld Institute of Art): Paolo Guinigi and Palla Strozzi: Lucchese Influence in Early Renaissance Florence. 5.30pm, Research Forum South Room

MEDIEVAL WORK-IN-PROGRESS

Wednesday, 22 May – Dr Robert Mills (University College London): Medieval Art and the Question of the Animal. 5.30pm, Research Forum South Room

Joint MEDIEVAL /RENAISSANCE WORK-IN-PROGRESS/Giotto’s O

Wednesday, 12 June – Professor Bram Kempers (University of Amsterdam): Duccio’s Maestà: Florence, Siena, Assisi and Rome. 5.30pm, Research Forum South Room

 All seminars are free and open to all

Further information : http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/researchforum/calendar.shtml

Research Forum

The Courtauld Institute of Art

Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN

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12.

Warburg Institute from April to June 2013. We have an exciting and varied range of conferences, lectures and seminars between now and the end of the academic year.

 

The full events programme is available at: http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/mnemosyne/AnnualProgramme2012_13.pdf  

Listed below are just a few of the conferences taking place:

  • 18 May 2013 – On the Peak of Darkness: From the Abyss to the Light, with Dante
  • 20 May 2013 – Classifying Content – Photographic Collections and Theories of Thematic Ordering (The Kress Foundation has made available funds to assist with the travel expenses of employees of Photographic Collections in the USA wishing to attend this conference – to apply email: jane.ferguson@sas.ac.uk)
  • 23 – 24 May 2013 – The Afterlife of Plutarch
  • 31 May – 1 June 2013 – The Place of Hell: Topographies, Structures, Genealogies
  • 14 – 15 June 2013 – The Alphabet of Nature and the Idols of the Market – Bacon on Languages, Natural and Human

Further details about all our events are available on our website at: http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/nc/events/

We would be grateful if you could display the Warburg programme on department notice boards and/or forward this email to any colleagues and students who you think may be interested in our events.

Warburg Institute MAs

We would also like to draw your attention to our new MA in Art History, Curatorship and Renaissance Culture which will take its first students in 2013-14 and is being offered jointly by the Warburg Institute and the National Gallery. The purpose of the programme is to provide high level linguistic, archive and research skills for a new generation of academic art historians and museum curators. The art historical and scholarly traditions of the Warburg Institute will be linked to the practical experience and skills of the National Gallery to provide training which will equip students either as academic art historians with serious insight into the behind the scenes working of a great museum or as curators with the research skills necessary for high-level museum work.

Further information on the new MA and on our existing MA in Cultural and Intellectual History 1300 – 1650 is available at: http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/graduate-studies/  Places are still available on both courses and we would be grateful if you could pass this information on to any of your colleagues or students who might be interested.

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13.

Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in English Literature University of Roehampton -Department of English and Creative Writing

 (1.0 FTE)

HR Ref No: HR64/13

 Salary: £36,630 to £48,008 pa inc

The Department of English and Creative Writing, comprising programmes in English Literature, Children’s Literature and Creative Writing, is well respected for its research and teaching excellence. This post is part of a period of strategic renewal, which has already seen five new appointments, seeking to consolidate our reputation for both traditional excellence and innovation. The successful post holder will join current colleagues in developing and extending our research and teaching profile in any aspect of English Literature from the Early Modern to the present.

We are seeking to appoint a full-time, without term Lecturer/Senior Lecturer. The department is particularly keen to hear from candidates who would complement existing research strengths in Early Modern, Romanticism, Victorian, Twentieth-Century, American Literature, and Children’s Literature. You will need to have completed a PhD or equivalent with a profile of high quality research publications in your discipline and a clear research plan. The appointee will be expected to help build the excellent research reputation of the Department of English and Creative Writing by engaging in high quality research.

The University of Roehampton is set on a beautiful, traditional campus in south-west London. The University provides its students with exceptional facilities, high quality teaching and a close-knit, collegiate experience.

 Roehampton has a diverse student body and a cosmopolitan outlook, with students from over 130 countries. The University is committed to a strong research culture, with two of its departments ranked the best in the country. Roehampton is on an ambitious trajectory and seeks to build on its increasing popularity by developing an innovative and distinctive portfolio.

Please note that CVs alone will not be considered.

Closing date, no later than 5.00pm: Monday 6 May 2013

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14.

Please find below details of:

Light, Colour, Veils – a conference to be held on 1st June at The Courtauld Institute of Art.

Ticket/entry details: £16 (£11 students, Courtauld staff and concessions): Book online here: http://courtauld-institute.digitalmuseum.co.uk

Further information here: http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/researchforum/events/2013/summer/jun01_LightColourVeils.shtml

With best wishes,

Research Forum

The Courtauld Institute of Art

Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN

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15.

 

https://www.jobs.soton.ac.uk/Vacancy.aspx?ref=228613F4

Temporary Lecturer in English, 1500-1660 English

Location:  Avenue Campus

Salary:   £27,854 to £31,331

Full Time Fixed Term

Closing Date:   Wednesday 29 May 2013

Interview Date:   To be confirmed

Reference:  228613F4

Fixed term for 1 year

Following the award of a Leverhulme Research Fellowship to Dr Alice Hunt, the Department of English invites applications for the post of a Lecturer in English. We are looking for an outstanding early career academic, who has published high quality research, and can demonstrate an excellent track record in teaching. The appointment is for one year, full time, and it is anticipated that the successful candidate will take up the post on 1 August 2013.

The Department of English at the University of Southampton demonstrates excellence in all periods of English Literature, and includes strengths in Creative Writing, Film, and Digital Humanities. We have a dynamic and collaborative research culture, both within and across periods, and enjoy strong interdisciplinary links with other departments in the Faculty of Humanities and the wider university. We have an excellent reputation for teaching, valuing both research-led teaching and teaching-led research, and are committed to knowledge exchange and public engagement.

You will possess an excellent honours degree, a completed doctorate in the literature, history, and culture of the Early Modern period, and an eagerness to contribute to the intellectual and creative culture of the department. An interest in Shakespeare and Early Modern drama would be an advantage.

 Further information about the department and the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Culture can be found atwww.soton.ac.uk/English.

I nformal enquiries may be made to Professor Ros King, Head of Department (r.king@soton.ac.uk).

 The closing date for applications is Wednesday 29 May 2013. Please apply throughwww.jobs.soton.ac.uk. Please quote vacancy reference number 228613F4 on all correspondence.

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Blogging ‘The Northern Renaissance’ Exhibition at the Queen’s Gallery

By Alexander Samson, on 17 April 2013

Below are some shorts posts by students studying at UCL for the MA in Early Modern Studies, who were treated to a scintillating private viewing with one of the exhibition’s curators. Our sincerest thanks to Hanae for setting it up and Lucy for giving up so much of her time to take us round, it was truly inspirational in every way.

 

The Triumph of Time over Fame (c.1515-20)

 This imposing tapestry shows the fifth scene in a six-piece set of the Triumphs of Petrarch, Petrarch’s famous cycle of allegorical poems. I Trionfi, composed between 1352 and 1374, inspired many pictorial cycles of which these tapestries are among the most extravagant. The poems describe a sequence of triumphal processions, in which the allegorical victor of the previous Triumph is shown defeated by a new subject. On the left, Fame sits upon her triumphal car, which is drawn by four elephants. She holds her emblematic four-horned trumpet, with which she has sent her story to the four corners of the earth. The chariot is accompanied by a crowd of renowned historical personages, now in disarray. On the right, the elderly Time, seated in a chariot drawn by four winged horses stands above the defeated Fame. Overhead, symbols of the zodiac and female personifications of the Hours travel with Time, away from Fame.

 The tapestry can be seen as a statement on the connection between literature and visual art, and the early modern interest in reproductions of written or printed ideas in visual forms. The set of tapestries was owned by Thomas Wolsey between 1523-9, during which time it was described in writing by Skelton in Collyn Clout, as part of an attack on Wolsey’s extravagant taste for tapestries. Skelton writes:

Hangynge aboute the walles
Clothes of golde and palles,
Arras of ryche aray,
Fresshe as flours in May
[…] With triumphes of Cesar,
And of Pompeyus war,
Of renowne and of fame
By them to get a name
Nowe all the worlde stares,
How they ryde in goodly chares,
Conueyed by olyphantes,
With lauryat garlantes,
And by vnycornes
With their semely hornes ;
Vpon these beestes rydynge,

[…] Nowe truly, to my thynkynge,
That is a speculacyon
And a mete meditacyon
For prelates of estate,
Their courage to abate
From worldly wantonnesse,
Theyr chambres thus to dresse.

Skelton’s description serves as a written reproduction of a tapestry which is already a visual imitation of a poem, and which itself makes several changes to the image. The elephants drawing the chariot recall those of Roman triumphs, but they are not mentioned by Petrarch. I Trionfi only describes a chariot in the first Triumph, that of Love, but by the mid-fifteenth century Florentine artists were depicting each triumph with a chariot and, during the second half of the century, this model was common in Italian manuscripts and engravings. This tapestry series owned by Wolsey is unique in attributing two chariots to each scene, departing further from the Petrarchan source. Here, a piece of visual art both alters and propagates a literary emblem, and leads to an additional written description of that piece of art.

 

 Ulrich Apt the Elder, Portrait of a Man and his Wife, 1512 and Lucas Cranach, Lucretia, 1530

What struck me most in this excellent exhibition was not a single painting but two in close proximity. In a fairly narrow section of one of the rooms, “Portrait of a Man and His Wife 1512” by Ulrich Apt the Elder hangs directly opposite “Lucretia” by Lucas Cranach the Elder. The former is a marriage portrait of a mature bourgeois couple, of no great beauty; they are realistically portrayed in everyday clothing, and the picture has a domestic air. This is contrasted with the directly facing depiction of Lucretia, the virtuous wife of a Roman nobleman, who was blackmailed and raped by Sextus Tarquinius and, shamed by her loss of honour, is about to stab herself  to death. She holds the point of the dagger against her naked breast. She is dressed in a sumptuous gown and headdress, the rich colours of which contrast with the almost drab domesticity of the couple opposite. Lucretia’s air of childlike innocence and the dagger held against her adolescent breast combine to create a highly erotic image. The juxtaposition of the mundane and the exotic/erotic in these two paintings provide a striking contrast.

 

Lucas Cranach, The Judgement of Paris c. 1530-5

This wonderfully detailed, beautiful painting by Lucas Cranach, hangs together with two other paintings creating a set. As stunning as this painting is, when it comes to the detailing in the painting, it is that which showcases the immense talent of Cranach. Looking at the painting, the veil over the three goddess’s bodies, the skill of Cranach becomes visible. The veils are so thin it is almost as if nothing covers them, yet the presence of the veils creates an air of mystery and allure around the women.

 Another detail concerning the women which makes the painting extraordinary is that Cranach has added a small amount of pubic hair. A detail which is striking as other paintings of the same period, an example of another painting by Cranach hanging right beside this painting, would present the naked female body without any hint of bodily hair. No body hair was seen as a sign of purity and it begs the question why Cranach would add the hair here and not in the painting next to this one.

Although the addition of the pubic hair may hint at the naked women’s impurity, their bodies and faces are set to an ideal, there is neither sign of a blemish nor any disfigurement, and they are a sign of perfection. The women are carefree and there is no sign of worry on their faces. This perfection also gives the women a rather youthful, adolescent, angelic look to them. Naturally there is a lot more to say on this painting, however, I would urge you to go the exhibition and see this painting alongside the other objects on display.

 

Quentin Massys, Desiderius Erasmus, 1517

What impressed me the most during our visit to the Queen’s Gallery was the portrait of Erasmus, a gift from the Dutch humanist to his English friend, Thomas More. It is interesting to see how the intellectuals maintained contact in the pre-photographic period. This painting reveals more than most of the pictures we have today. The resemblance between Erasmus and St. Jerome implies his new translation of St. Jerome’s bible. Moreover, the friendship between Erasmus and More are symbolized in the books on the shelf, including their collaboration of translating Lucian’s Dialogues and Erasmus’ ‘Praise of Folly’, written during his stay in London. To a large extent, the portrait is almost a letter itself. It commemorates the time the two intellectuals spent together as well as the product of their scholarly efforts; meanwhile, it reports the recent project of Erasmus. Ironically, when we look back at the pictures on Facebook, most of the vivid images tell less about our lives and thoughts.

 

Note: They have a Tudor and Stuart fashion exhibition forthcoming over the summer.